Why Everybody’s Complaining about Ben Affleck Playing Batman is Unnecessary and Getting Old

Thursday night Warner Brothers finally gave us a new Bruce Wayne aka Batman in the form of Ben Affleck! But of course, in no surprise the internet voiced their opinions and they were, well opinionated. Ranging from (mostly) outage, approval, mixed reaction and finally people willing to give Affleck a chance at the Dark Knight himself. So what do I think of Affleck playing Batman? I freaking love it.

 

I’m not just saying this because I like Ben Affleck. I’m saying this because I think he’ll do a good job. Will he be the best Batman? Who knows, even I can admit that. But let’s at least give him the benefit of the doubt and wait until you see some footage of him. And let’s face it, he’s not the worse choice to play one of the most iconic comic book characters still around. Personally, I think one of the reasons people don’t want Affleck in the role is because they have a bitter taste in their mouths with his portrayal of Daredevil and performance in Gigli (I’ll give you that one). Although Daredevil had a lot more problems going for it that wasn’t Affleck.

 

However, Affleck has proven himself to his critics in the recent years with his directorial efforts of Gone Baby Gone, The Town and Argo; only acting in the last two but they proved that Affleck can, and has also been able to, act. Hell, he won an Academy Award for Argo. Besides Daredevil he’s also played Superman, well sort of. He played George Reeve aka the first Superman on TV in Hollywoodland. He was nominated for a Golden Globe for supporting actor so we know he has no problems playing a troubled soul.

 

So why are we complaining about Affleck playing Batman? He’s a great actor and yes some roles are questionable but what actor hasn’t made those roles. Besides we still don’t know what kind of Bruce Wayne/Batman he will be. Zack Snyder and David S. Goyer haven’t said exactly what kind of Batman he will play. We do know it won’t be the same Batman in the Christopher Nolan Trilogy, hell for all we know Affleck could go the corny route (probably won’t but still).

 

Here’s the main reason why all this outrage is a bit premature. This isn’t the first time this has happened! There has been backlash on actors playing Batman before and all popular roles for that matter (Daniel Craig wasn’t welcomed as 007). Michael Keaton wasn’t welcomed and sticking with Batman films Anne Hathaway and Heath Ledger weren’t accepted by fans for playing iconic characters like Catwoman (or Selena Kyle as she was referred to The Dark Knight Rises) or The Joker. But fans came around after they saw their performances, especially with Ledger’s Joker.

 

So why all the hostility? Simple, fanboys will never be happy. But we, everybody else, also don’t like change. Going back off track, look at Doctor Who. We know the Doctor will have to go through a change and when it comes time for it, everyone goes into defensive mode and complains about the actor chosen before we see him play the iconic actor (Matt Smith taking over after David Tennant).

 

So let’s just give Affleck a chance shall we. Don’t judge him until we at least see some footage. I know it might me hard for a lot of you out there but at least try. Because whether you like it or not Affleck has signed on for multiple films as the Caped Crusader.

‘The World’s End’ Review

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Dir: Edgar Wright

Cast: Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Martin Freeman, Paddy Considine, Eddie Marsan, and Rosamund Pike

Synopsis: Five friends who reunite in an attempt to top their epic pub crawl from 20 years earlier unwittingly become humankind’s only hope for survival.

 

*Review Note: This is a non-spoiler review as always.”

 

All good things must come to an end, and in this case, with a pint of beer. Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost bring an end to their so called “Blood and Ice Cream Trilogy” (or The Cornetto Trilogy) with The World’s End. The trilogy started with Shaun of the Dead then to Hot Fuzz and while the movies aren’t sequels or share the same universe (besides all being set in the U.K and have the ice cream Cornetto) the movies do share the same themes. Every movie has theme of friendship and growing up in some senses.

In the early nineties a group of five friends, led by fearless schoolboy rebel Gary King (Pegg), attempted to complete the infamous “Golden Mile.” It consists of twelve pubs and the goal for Gary is to have one beer at each. But, they have never made it to the end. Now an adult Gary convinces and drags his now estranged friends Andy (Frost), Oliver (Freeman), Peter (Marsan), and Steven (Considine) complete the journey from years past. Unfortunately for Gary all of them have grown up and are successful businessmen, husbands, and fathers but they reluctantly follow him back to their small town of Newton Haven.

But during the crawl they realize that the townsfolk are a bit different and odd. Eventually finding out (the hard way) the town has been taken over by robots impersonating their former neighbors. Already a bit buzzed at this point they decide to finish the crawl thinking they’ll be safe, but of course their not.

It’s probably going to be a bit hard for people to not compare this with the previous films and you shouldn’t. Unlike the other films, Pegg is the oddball here and not Frost. Pegg even though an adult still acts like he’s a teenager and may make him unlikeable to many viewers, which is okay. That’s kind of the point. It’s Pegg’s performance however that so great it’s fun to watch. It’s near the end that his performance shows Pegg isn’t just a comedic actor.

Interestingly at the other end, its Frost that is cast against type in the role of Andy, a corporate lawyer, a rugby player, and family man. He was once Gary’s best friend but something happened that made them drift apart. It a nice change to see the switch around and the tension between the two is fun, different, and more mature to see.

The film features plenty of familiar faces, but it’s the core of five friends that really carry it. Eddie Marsan, Paddy Considine, and Martin Freeman are all given individual moments to shine, but fit in well within the larger ensemble. Rosamund Pike is great when on screen but is given relatively little to do, though she really shows just how Gary never really grew up.

Of course, as with all of Wright’s films, everything is wrapped in a genre shell. There’s always time for a dramatic moment (that surprisingly doesn’t slow down the movie much) even if blue-blooded robots are looking to hurt our heroes. But it’s the robot design that’s pretty cool. The robots are kind of ceramic/plastic filled vessels with blue blood, and shine blue light from their eyes and mouth when angered. To an average moviegoer, it might seem lazy but combine it with Wright’s sense of style it’s pretty smart.

All in all, The World’s End is very different from the past films and steps up the game acting wise and action wise. Seriously the fights scenes in the movie caught me off guard. However, this being the last film of the Cornetto Trilogy it is truly a great way to go out.

 

 

The World’s End

4.5 out of 5

‘Kick-Ass 2’ Review

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Dir: Jeff Wadlow (Cry Wolf, Never Back Down)

Cast: Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Chloe Grace Moretz, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Morris Chestnut, Clark Duke, John Leguizamo and Jim Carrey

Synopsis: The costumed high-school hero Kick-Ass joins with a group of normal citizens who have been inspired to fight crime in costume. Meanwhile, the Red Mist plots an act of revenge that will affect everyone Kick-Ass knows.

 

*Review Note: This is a non-spoiler review as always. And if you want, stay after the credits for a quick scene.”

 

Kick-Ass was the little superhero movie that could. Shot on a relatively low-budget, introducing a comic-book character who was new, and featuring just one movie star in Nicolas Cage. The film nevertheless did something nobody thought it would do, get a cult following. Three years later we get a sequel that doesn’t have the same first-time charm the first had but still is a worthy sequel. The movie, like the first, isn’t just about normal people becoming superheroes but also about growing up and dealing with the consequences of their actions.

Mindy Macready aka Hit-Girl (Moretz) is now living her father’s former partner Marcus Williams (Chestnut) and is a freshmen in high school. Marcus tries to deal with the fact that Mindy can’t let go of her old life and all Mindy wants to do is be Hit-Girl and keep her fathers promise of protecting the city but also wants to make Marcus happy and do what he tells her. Marcus also wants Mindy to fit in at school which of course isn’t that easy for her.

Then finally there’s Chris D’Amico (Mintz-Plasse). Now donning an emo look and obsessing with getting revenge on Kick-Ass for killing his father. Chris with one of his family’s bodyguards Javier (Leguizamo) starts to put a team together that includes former convicts and killers. The standout of his evil super-team is Mother Russia played by Russian body builder Olga Kurkulina. Chris also has renamed himself “The Motherfucker.”

Meanwhile at the same time Dave aka Kick-Ass, now a high school senior, is bored with his life but at the same time wants something exciting to happen. Eventually, he pleas to Mindy to help him train and become a better fighter. After Mindy takes Marcus’ advice to stop being Hit-Girl, Dave finds himself wanting to team up and since he can’t have Hit-Girl he finds himself a group calling themselves Justice Forever.

They include a mob enforcer-turned-born again Christian Colonel Stars and Stripes, and his trusty sidekick dog Eisenhower played by Jim Carrey. The group also includes Dr. Gravity (Donald Faison), Night Bitch (Lindy Booth), Insect Man (Robert Emms) and a mother/father duo Remember Tommy. They aren’t Hit-Girl level superhero but Kick-Ass joins them anyways to help rid of the city of, as they put it, injustice.

Like I said before, Kick-Ass 2 doesn’t really have the same charm the first did. Probably because we didn’t know what to suspect in the first movie (unless you read the comics) and I’m not saying this is a bad thing. The movie works on its own levels and you really shouldn’t compare this to the first. The message is the same, the humor is still there, and violence is about to maybe a little more than the first. The one thing the movie does have more of is drama. With our main heroes Dave and Mindy having inner struggles to how they really are and having spats with their guardians – Mindy with Marcus and Dave with his father – the movie does slow down a bit so we can feel for the characters. We know who they are and what they can do but no one does.

We see Mindy falling to the pressures of high school and Dave taking responsibility for his actions as he becomes a man. It’s necessary but with the rest of the movie filled with violence and humor it makes the movie tonally a bit odd to take in.

The performances are stronger this time around with the main three cast members. Aaron Taylor-Johnson has some great comic timing and is a little more hands on this time around. Chloe Grace Moretz is better than ever as Hit-Girl. She shows and has the right combination of fearlessness and vulnerability. Christopher Mintz-Plasse goes through a complex journey if that’s what you want to call it. His character makes you both hate and possibly feel a little sorry for him.

The new plays are hit and miss but of course everyone will talk (and have been) about Carrey’s Colonel. Despite his wackiness and humor at times, he does give the movie a bit heart and soul in one particular scene. Wouldn’t say he steals the movie (some will and there’s nothing wrong with that) because I think that goes to Olga Kurkulina’s Mother Russia. She’s a force of nature almost and her fight with Hit-Girl near the end of the movie was definitely a standout.

All in all, Kick-Ass 2 is a ton of fun. If you liked the first movie then you will most likely like this one. It can even be described as a twisted coming of age story. Is the movie for everyone? No. But let’s face it a movie called Kick-Ass probably isn’t going to be for everyone.

 

Kick Ass 2

4 out of 5

‘Elysium’ Review

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Dir: Neil Blomkamp

Cast: Matt Damon, Jodie Foster, Sharlto Copley, Alice Braga, Diego Luna, Wagner Moura and William Fichnter

Synopsis: Set in the year 2154, where the very wealthy live on a man-made space station while the rest of the population resides on a ruined Earth, a man takes on a mission that could bring equality to the polarized worlds

 

*Review Note:This is a non-spoiler review as always.”

 

In 2009 Neill Blomkamp gave to us one of the best sci-fi films in a while with District 9. It wasn’t just an action movie but so a social commentary that hit a chord with many people and earned itself a Best Picture Oscar nomination in the process. Now, Blomkamp has given us Elysium, an equally intelligent sci-fi film that replaces the issue of racism with poverty, immigration and overpopulation but also delivers great action sequences.

The world has been divided into two very distinct groups: the poor, who live on the diseased and overcrowded earth, and the wealthy, who have fled to a man-made space station called ‘Elysium’ in order to preserve their privileged way of life.

Through flashbacks we are introduced to Max (Damon), an orphan struggling to understand the world he’s apart of. Max’s ambition is to one day make it onto Elysium, but when we encounter him as an adult in the ruined Los Angeles, he couldn’t be further from fulfilling that dream

Serving parole and working on an assembly line building robots Max’s life is made more terrible when he suffers an accident at work which has devastating consequences on his health, making his need to reach Elysium all the more important. Meanwhile, Secretary Delacourt (Foster)– responsible for the defense of Elysium – is finding herself frustrated by the administration and wants to do something drastic to change it.

Max, with no way out of his situation, goes to his old boss Spider (Wagner Moura) with the help of his friend Julio (Diego Luna) to find away up to Elysium. This brings in the mechanic exoskeleton that we see Damon wear. The suit not only gives him the strength but serves another purpose to the story. When Spider sets a plan a motion Delacourt activates Kruger (Copley) ,a sleeper agent who is charged with the task of doing her bidding on earth.

It’s pretty cool concept once you see the whole movie. Blomkamp seems to be very good at this brand of high-concept sci-fi, the film’s narrative similar to District 9 in that it sets up a credible future-world, takes an ordinary man, places him in extraordinary circumstances, gives him near superhuman powers (alien DNA in D9, a mech-suit here) and follows his efforts to smash the system.

Aesthetically Elysium isn’t really that similar to District 9 (although you shouldn’t compare the two really). The visuals are more sophisticated this time around, the technological advancements made in the last four years make Elysium seem like what the movies makes it out to be, a wonderful place to live, if you can afford it of course.

Unlike District 9, the film is filled with a well known cast lead by Matt Damon. His Max character is a complicated character to the point where we know he’s an ex-convict trying to make an honest living but has to do things he knows are wrong in order to make it right. The flashback scenes and his relationship with Frey (Braga), a childhood friend, make him more sympathetic toward the viewer.

Foster’s Delacourt is interesting. She can be seen as the villain (although I didn’t see her as the real villain of the movie) but all her action are done to protect “the habitat” as she refers to it. The weird part though is Foster’s accent. I’m not one to complain about actors accents but it seemed like Foster was struggling a bit to keep it when she had long speeches. William Fichtner plays a businessman John Carlyle who shares most of his screen time with Foster and although a short role it’s important.

The standout however is Sharlto Copley as Kruger. He’s a man of few words at first but gradually starts to become a hassle to everybody involved. You can tell he had a lot of fun playing the role and he chews up the scenery when he’s on camera which I was okay with.

Ultimately Elysium is Neill Blomkamp’s film. The visuals are great to look at and even though it has a cool and pretty original story; the film does have some sci-fi elements we’ve seen before (still cool to watch though) but also goes into a straight action film.

All in all, Elysium has everything;  sci-fi, action, some humor, a great story with cool characters and is damn entertaining.

 

Elysium

4.5 out of 5