‘Noah’ Review

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Dir: Darren Aronofsky
Cast: Russell Crowe, Jennifer Connelly, Ray Winstone, Emma Watson, Logan Lerman, Douglas Booth, and Anthony Hopkins
Synopsis: A man is chosen by God to undertake a momentous mission of rescue before an apocalyptic flood destroys the world.

 
*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review of this interruption of the biblical tale.*

 
Whatever your faith or how much you believe or don’t believe in the story itself, the tale of Noah is inherently a tough one – this is a story involving just about all of humanity wiped out, all at once. And this film doesn’t shy away from that at all, both in the grand scale of those killed by the floods and also in smaller, more intimate and, arguably, more disturbing ways. There is one scene in particular where Noah makes a choice that is frankly shocking to see. Director Darren Aronofsky and Russell Crowe walk a delicate line here with audience sympathy, yet manage to convey that this is a man doing what he truly believes must be done, no matter how difficult it is to comprehend at face value. According to Aronofsky, and something I come to see as well, Noah is person that suffers from the ultimate survivor’s guilt. This movie touches on that but also asks another question, what happens when you give a man an extremely life changing mission?

 

The opening (including some text onscreen that, essentially, gives you the grand scale of things with some cool Aronosfky visuals) establishes that God, here called “The Creator”, is certainly believed in by everyone, but also has gone so long that it’s assumed he long abandoned or moved on from the people he put on the Earth. The exception to this, of course, is Noah (Crowe) who begins to have visions sent to him by the Creator, warning that thanks to humanity’s misdeeds, the end is coming, in the form of a great flood.

 

With the aid of his grandfather, Methuselah (Hopkins, although he is only referred to as Grandfather by everyone in Noah’s family and Noah himself), Noah realizes he is meant to build a massive Ark, which will hold animals and Noah’s own family, all of whom will be the key to re-starting society all over again. Although Noah takes pride in his task at the outset, he starts to doubt if anyone, including his family, is worthy of being saved

 

Noah is assisted by his family from the start, including his wife, Naameh (Connelly) and his sons, the oldest Shem (Booth), the middle child Ham (Lerman) and the youngest Japheth (McHugh Carroll). And then there’s Ila (Watson), who they saved as a little girl and raise among their family – where she and Shem are romantically involved.

 

This version of Noah is obviously a different interpretation told than before. Besides Noah’s family, Noah is helped by others in the form of the Watchers, angels that are envisioned as giant rock creatures trapped in their current form as a punishment by the Creator. The Watchers have an angelic light inside them that makes their eyes and mouth glow, making them feel like something out of Lord of the Rings. The design is interesting as they’re so massive they kind of just lunge around but when its time to take action and protect the Ark, they become one of the highlights of the film, even though we never really get to know their names expect for Og (voiced by Frank Langella) and Samyaza (voiced by Nick Nolte).

 

The cast for the most part really works. Crowe can convey toughness and determination and is, for this interpretation, the right guy to play someone as focused as Noah is, who will not let anything get in his way. He also gets to show some other pretty intense emotions as the film continues and Noah begins to believe that perhaps the Creator’s intentions are even more difficult than it seemed, on a personal level. He’s also a bit of a badass. We see Noah early on defend himself from three attackers and when the Ark is under attack from Tubal-cain (the always reliable Ray Winestone) and his army, he does what he has to do to complete his mission.

 

As for the other men in the film, Lerman who plays Ham is the most conflicted amongst Noah’s sons, and has some understandable concerns and jealousies. Ham’s conflict brings him into the growing struggle between Noah and Tubal-cain, a villain who also has a unique position in the film. He does do awful things but he says things in such away you almost feel wrong agreeing with him. Douglas Booth’s Shem, the oldest son, isn’t given a lot to do but protect Watson’s Ila. Finally, Anthony Hopkins for the short amount of screen time he has does his usual best

 

But beside Crowe and Winstone, the women really do take center stage here. More specifically Emma Watson as Ila. Thanks to being attacked as a child she is unable to have children – something that is a concern to her given that she is the future of mankind. Watson holds her own with Crowe and have some great chemistry together, especially near the end. But, Watson is excellent at conveying Ila feelings as she looks at her place in this family. Jennifer Connelly’s Naameh, doesn’t have much to do at first, but Connelly stands out in one particular scene near the end as Naameh stands up to Noah; for the first time believing her husband, who she has supported for so long, is the wrong about a decision he’s making.

 

Not shockingly, Aronofsky’s visuals are gorgeous, highlighted by a sequence in which we see the Creation Story play out in a dynamic, thrilling manner, that expertly mixes time-lapse photography with special effects.

 

There are some iffy CGI at points (mostly with the animals but considering the scale of this project it’s kind of okay) and, despite its huge scale, Noah does have some moments where it hits some bumps. As I mentioned earlier, the promotional material surprisingly hasn’t given away much. We actually see and spend a good chuck of time in the Ark. Here is where the movie slows down a bit, but with great acting scenes and the dilemmas the characters, mostly Noah, have to make it adds some tense and emotional sequences that make the time in the Ark worth while.

 

All in all, Noah will, obviously, play very differently depending on how you interpret the Bible or even care about religion. Some will probably find it boring or uninteresting, which is fine, but given the bold approach that Aronofsky takes I hope people appreciate the movie just for what it is (I know, that’s asking a lot).

 

Noah
4 out of 5

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‘Sabotage’ Review

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Dir: David Ayer
Cast: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sam Worthington, Joe Manganiello, Josh Holloway, Terrence Howard, Mireille Enos, Max Martini, Harold Perrineau and Olivia Williams
Synopsis: Members of an elite DEA task force find themselves being taken down one by one after they rob a drug cartel safe house.

 
*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 
John “Breacher” Wharton (Schwarzenegger) is a veteran DEA agent who leads an elite, hardcore special ops team, most of whom we only know through nicknames: “Grinder (Manganeillo), “Monster” (Worthington), “Neck” (Holloway), “Sugar” (Howard), “Pyro” (Martini), as well as the regularly named “Lizzy” (Enos). During a raid on a drug house, they attempt to steal $10 million, but when they go to retrieve the money, it’s missing. Forced to lay low, the team eventually reunites only to start being picked off one-by-one. Local detective Caroline (Williams) and her partner Jackson (Perrineau) come into investigate, and Caroline reluctantly teams up with Breacher to find out who’s murdering his team.

 

The promotional material has sold Sabotage as an all out action movie, whereas it’s really a mystery thriller, and a character-driven one at that. Every character is shady or at least a little shady, including Arnold’s “Breacher” character. You would think that DEA agents that are tasked with talking down cartels or ruining their plans would be professional to some extend but our “heroes” will act out, drink, do drugs and not even worry about taking arrests, they simple kill their targets. This is all a bit odd because at first we are rooting for the team. There is a real camaraderie between them and the banter between them seems real. But once everything goes to hell, they change completely and we as the viewer are left wondering if we should like anyone one of these people.

 

Sabotage is almost unlike anything Arnold’s done before. The first time we see him in this movie he has his head in his hands, sobbing and helpless. Arnold really does commit to it and it’s nice to see him try to do something so different at this stage in his career. But, of course, being Arnold he still appears to be settled comfortably into the role of the grizzled, old soldier who can still kick ass. Which he does here.

 

But, it’s supporting cast that also helps Arnold out in the end. Joe Manganiello and a nearly unrecognizable Sam Worthington play their members who view Arnold’s leader as a surrogate father. Arguably the show-stealer is Mirrelle Enos as Lizzy, the team’s only female member and an ass-kicker in every sense of the term. The only other female cast member in the movie, Olivia Williams, is a no nonsense cop who gets sucked into the teams hell and is a somewhat love interest for “Breacher.”

 

Harold Perrineau as Williams’ partner has some nice banter but doesn’t really do much. Josh Holloway as “Neck” has some memorably lines. But, Terrence Howard is really under-used and you sometimes forget he’s around unless he speaks. They really could have gotten any one else to play the part. But, such is the problem with some ensemble casts. Some are bound to fall in the wayside.

 

The movie also has some few blind-siding plot twists that will probably divide people but they kind of work in the end, although they could have gone a different way to show them. One truly comes out of nowhere and I felt it probably didn’t need to go that way because at the end it didn’t really matter. Still some of twist where nice to see and made the movie different from what it could have been.

 

All in all, Sabotage is more a mystery thriller with action sequences scattered throughout. The movie can get a little clunky in some areas but overall the movie is enjoyable enough and will keep you guessing until the end.

 

Sabotage
3.5 out of 5

‘Divergent’ Review

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Dir: Neil Burger

Cast: Shailene Woodley, Theo James, Jai Courtney, Zoe Kravitz, Miles Teller, Ansel Elgort, Ray Stevenson, Tony Goldwyn, Ashley Judd, Maggie Q, and Kate Winslet

Synopsis: In a world divided by factions based on virtues, Tris learns she’s Divergent and won’t fit in. When she discovers a plot to destroy Divergents, Tris and the mysterious Four must find out what makes Divergents dangerous before it’s too late

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

Based off the popular Young Adult Novel of the same name by Veronica Roth, Divergent is set in a dystopian, post-war Chicago where its citizens are divided into five factions, each one emphasizing a particular personality trait: Abnegation (selflessness), Amity (kindness), Erudite (intelligence), Candor (honesty), and Dauntless (bravery).  Each one is assigned certain jobs, e.g. Abnegation runs the government, Erudite handles science, and Dauntless are the soldiers.  Every citizen must choose their faction and are given a test to see, which faction suits them best.  When Abnegation citizen Beatrice Prior (Woodley), who later calls herself Tris, takes the test, she comes up as “Divergent”, which she has to hide because it will make her a target against the higher ranks that including Jeanine (Winslet).

Divergents “threaten the system,” as we’re told over and over by various characters in urgent and cryptic whispers. Why they pose such a danger is not revealed until later in the movie and even then it doesn’t pack much of a punch (at least for me).  Despite that, the movie has an interesting world, but we never fully grasp what it really is. We see a somewhat ruined Chicago (which is cool because it’s the home city) with some futuristic touches and we get the idea of the Fraction-less.  But the only real concept we see is Beatrice’s Abnegation house when the family eats dinner around a single, tiny light bulb.  There are conflicts between the fractions, Erudite and Abnegation, although we don’t see it and are only told through Peter (Teller), who bashes Tris any chance he can get.

Of course being based off a young adult novel, Tris has a love interest in her instructor and Dauntless member Four (James). I’ll admit Woodley and James’ chemistry is one of the best things about Divergent but at the same time it takes away from the other relationships that Tris has with spunky Christina (Kravitz), Will (Ben Lloyd-Hughes) and Al (Christian Madsen).  Even her “rival” Peter and ruthless instructor Eric (Courtney) don’t feel bad, although Eric is menacing at times.

Again, Woodley is probably one of the better parts of the movie. She brings her A-game when need be and adds some depth to the scenes, even when it’s not necessarily needed.  Theo James adds some mystery to Four and tries to lead Tris in the right direction.  On the other hand, there is some wasted talent when it comes to Kate Winslet’s Jeanine, who feels like she’s evil for the sake of being evil.  Even Ray Stevenson’s Marcus, the leader of Abnegation, and Ashley Judd who plays Tris mother feel like they could have gotten other people to do them and it wouldn’t have made a difference.

Thankfully, it does make an effort to deliver on the action, although some feels a bit anti-climatic.  The zip-lining across Chicago skylines is pretty cool.  Even the “fear tests” have some vivid imagery and is the only time the movie allows itself to go into “dark territory” which I kind of wish the movie had more of.

All in all, Divergent is kind of all over the place. For a movie that’s about two and half hours long, it kind of feels like it’s running fast to get through a lot of story that it misses the details that could make it come alive and the plot points that could help it make sense. Although it sounds like I’m bashing it, there were some moments that I did enjoy. While it’s not any different from the other Young Adult Novel adaptation, I’m guessing fans of the book will enjoy seeing the story on the big screen. I know the five pre-teen girls sitting behind me did.

Divergent

3 out of 5

‘Need for Speed’ Review

Dir: Scott Waugh

Cast: Aaron Paul, Dominic Cooper, Imogen Poots, Scott Mescudi, Rami Malek, Ramon Rodriguez, Harrison Gilbertson, Dakota Johnson, and Michael Keaton

Synopsis: Fresh from prison, a street racer who was framed by a wealthy business associate joins a cross country race with revenge in mind. His ex-partner, learning of the plan, places a massive bounty on his head as the race begins.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Need for Speed, based on the popular EA racing games, follows Tobey Marshall (Paul) is a former racing star who’s now struggling to make the payments on the auto shop he inherited from his dad.  When his rival Dino Brewster (Cooper) offers Tobey and his crew 25% of the profits on a restored Mustang and they, of course, take the job.  After the car sells in a way Dino doesn’t like, he wagers with Tobey and Tobey’s friend Pete (Gilbertson) an all-or-nothing race.  Tobey takes the wager and is about to win when a desperate Dino nudges Pete off the road, and kills him.  Tobey gets blamed for the crash and is sent to jail for two years. Once he gets out, he chooses to get revenge on Dino by beating him in the prestigious De Leon race held by Monarch (Keaton), an ex-racer-turned-Internet phenomenon.  The Mustang buyer’s assistant, Julia (Poots), provides the restored car and the two head across country while dodging cops and a bounty put by Dino.

While some will probably say the movie is trying to copy or be like The Fast and The Furious franchise, Need for Speed is kind of its own thing.  The movie does have its comedic moments, one scene in particular with one of Toby’s crew members Finn (Malek), but aside from that the movie is very much grounded. The movie has prided itself on using actual stunts instead with few CGI as possible, does make the car chases a bit more thrilling to watch and gives the movie a bit more creditability at the end. Of course, reviewers look at this as a mistake and some even say that the seriousness of the movie ruins the whole movie entirely. While there are some scenes that do prove that it doesn’t change the experience, well at least for me.

On the acting side, Aaron Paul, of Breaking Bad fame, does what he can with his role as a man looking for revenge but other than that he doesn’t really do anything else.  He does have good chemistry with Poots’ character Julia, who is more than just a pretty face. Toby’s crew include; a pilot, Benny, who keeps an eye of them, and mechanics Joe and Finn. All three of them are the comic relief of the movie and while some of the jokes do feel forced there are some real genuine moments that make you feel like they have been friends for a while.

Dominic Cooper’s villain Dino is nothing more than a cocky former pro-racer who wants things done his way and will do anything he can to get it.  Michael Keaton chews up a bit of the scenes he’s in as Monarch, but I think people will be happy to see him on the big screen again.

But let’s face it, the reason people will watch this movie is for the car sequences.  Like I said before, Need for Speed prided itself on using actual stunts with a touch of CGI, which does make the car chases a bit more thrilling to watch and enjoy. Thankfully, Scott Waugh (Act of Valor) went that direction otherwise the movie could have gone in another direction for the worse. Waugh even brings some descent POV shots and puts you in the car sometimes. Like the game, the races all build up to the last race which is Monarch’s pride-and-joy, the De Leon, where the winner gets millions of dollars and the fancy cars.

All in all, Need for Speed isn’t a great movie but it isn’t as bad as the reviewers want to make you think.  Paul, Poots and Keaton are the better parts of the movie but in reality the car chase sequences are the best part of Need for Speed.

 

Need for Speed

3.5 out of 5

‘300: Rise of an Empire’ Review

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Dir: Noam Murro

Cast: Sullivan Stapleton, Eva Green, Lena Headey, Hans Matheson, Callan Mulvey, David Wenham, Jack O’Connell and Rodrigo Santoro

Synopsis: Greek general Themistokles leads the charge against invading Persian forces led by mortal-turned-god Xerxes and Artemisia, vengeful commander of the Persian navy

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be an almost spoiler free review. Reason being is that the movie serves as prequel, side-story and sequel to 300, so some stuff will come up. However, I won’t spoil anything from Rise of an Empire.*

 

As stated above in the Reviewer Note, 300: Rise of an Empire is a prequel, side-story, and sequel to the 2006 hit 300.  The movie starts with Queen Gorgo (Headey) giving a speech about fallen 300 Spartans and gives a brief history of the Battle of Marathon. We then go witness the Athenian army, led by hero Themistokles (Stapleton) attacking King Darius’ men. From there we get the origins of the “god king” Xerxes (Santoro), who is Darius’ son (not a spoiler since IT’S HISTORY).  But we also find out that the only reason for Xerxes plans of revenge of world dominance comes from a ruthless general Artemisia (Green).

As you’ve probably seen in the trailers and TV spots, the action mostly takes place at sea.  The Athenians, which are the heroes this time around, are skilled sailors and battle Artemisia’s much larger army across the ocean.  But during all the action we occasionally cut to moments from 300 to get a concept of the timeline or even scenes with Themistokles going to Sparta to meet Queen Gorgo or a pre-Hot Gates injured Dilios (David Wenham).

Themistokles is very different from King Leonidas. Themistokles is fighting for a united Greece and wants to spread the new Athenian concept of democracy as opposed to Sparta’s self-preservation.  Also, opposed to the Spartan soldiers, the Athenian navy is made up of farm-hands, tradesmen, and more.

Artemisia, on the other hand, is ruthless, quick-tempered, and at times blinded by vengeance. Which is a recurring theme in the movie with most of the characters driven by revenge of something.  Her plan “to erase Athens from history” is an extreme one however, as are her actions throughout the film – which makes her one, if not, the best character of the movie, but Artemesia is given some real context, and when you discover the reason for her wrath, she becomes somewhat sympathetic.

Director Noam Murro’s only previous credit is romantic comedy Smart People, so it’s a bit of an unusual choice for the director’s chair. Thankfully, Murro makes Rise of an Empire into an enjoyable and fun action movie.  He makes some stand-out sequences included a fiery sea battle, the last fight and even the love scene is filmed like a brawl. A literal battle of the sexes that’s more erotic than you would think (and probably should be).

Acting wise, Eva Green owns the role and like I said before is probably one of, if not the best, character in the movie. She has a femme fatale quality to her but is very manipulative toward Xerxes. Anytime she’s on screen she isn’t chewing the scenery but pushing the story forward or ready to kill someone. She’s truly an amazing character. If Green wasn’t on anyone’s radar she will be after this.

Sullivan Stapleton heroic Themistokles plays his role as a man that is driven to bring the nation together to fight the greater threat but is also a character filled with guilt over his involvement in the starting of the war, and his regret at sending so many young men to early graves. Being a fan of his from his Cinemax show Strike Back, it’s nice to see Stapleton on the big screen and he definitely has a leading man screen presence.

In smaller roles, Lena Heady who returns as the Spartan Queen Gorgo delivers some of the film’s best lines but isn’t really anything more than a cameo.  Jack O’Connell, plays Calisto, a young warrior who wants to make his father Scyllias (Callan Mulvey) proud of him. Rodrigo Santoro’s Xerxes really takes a back seat in this, only appearing in a few scenes mostly with Artemisia, but doesn’t really do much.

But, the real highlight in the movie is the action. The sea battles are pretty cool to watch although some will probably be thrown off by some of the wonky camera work (I’ll admit I did at times). The sword battles are also pretty cool this time around and some are fast hitting that you loose yourself in the action. They’re, dare I say, more hard hitting and extreme this time around than 300.

All in all, 300: Rise of an Empire is a great action movie and thankfully it doesn’t completely try to copy what made 300 what it was, although there are some things that are welcomed. The way the story is set up and told really works as it all comes together (obviously) at the end. For a sequel that some people wanted, I’d say some will be happy with the outcome.

 

300: Rise of an Empire

4 out of 5

‘Non-Stop’ Review

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Dir: Jaume Collet-Serra

Cast: Liam Neeson, Julianne Moore, Michelle Dockery, Scoot McNairy, Nate Parker, Corey Stoll, Anson Mount and Lupita Nyong’o

Synopsis:. An air marshal springs into action during a transatlantic flight after receiving a series of text messages that put his fellow passengers at risk unless the airline transfers $150 million into an off-shore account.

*Reviewer Note:  This is a spoiler free review as always.*

Air Marshal Bill Marks (Neeson) boards a plane, win what he thinks will be regular flight.  Little does he know, a passenger on the plane sends him a text over the private network warning him a passenger will die every twenty minutes unless $150 million is transferred to a specific bank account, that later turns out to be his.  Now, over the Atlantic Ocean, Marks is in a race-against-time to find the man who is framing him and threaten to kill people on the plane.

Once we get in the plane, everyone is pretty much a suspect. Ranging from his seatmate Jen Summers (Moore), one of the many ticked off passengers (Stoll), tech app inventor (Parker) and the flight attendants which is lead by Michelle Dockery. With so many suspect and no good lead, Marks is desperate before the clock goes to zero. Marks badgers the passengers and occasionally grabs them roughly for some interrogation. With no one to trust, force is his only option, even if it makes him look like the bad guy to the people on board and the authorities on the ground.

Neeson does his thing as usual, playing the gruff badass character who is a little broken inside.  His character isn’t necessarily innocent, which gives the character some levity, but that’s getting into spoiler territory so I’ll let you witness that on your own.  Moore also does her thing trying to help Bill solve everything but, again, is somewhat suspicions.  Dockery’s flight attendant Nancy also tries to help Bill but when he starts to take extremes she starts to doubt whether the threat is real or not.

Other smaller roles include; the other prominent flight attendant Gwen played by 12 Years a Slave’s Lupita Nyong’o, co-pilot Kyle (Jason Butler Harner), Corey Stoll and Scoot McNairy.  Harner, Stoll, McNairy and Nate Parker characters give Bill some challenges along the way, but of course nothing can stop Bill from trying to find his target.

One of the nice things about the movie is that it could have gone into the usual thriller tropes but it keeps the viewer guessing until the very end.  It’s probably what makes this movie work so well in that aspect.  However, in the last act of the movie when we find out the person responsible it does kind of get to generic territory.

All in all, Non-Stop could have been a cliché/generic and predictable thriller but instead director Jaume Collet-Serra and co. bought their A-game and gave us an enjoyable who-done-it thriller.

Non-Stop

4 out of 5

‘Pompeii’ Review

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Dir: Paul W.S. Anderson

Cast: Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Jessica Lucas, Carrie-Anne Moss, Jared Harris and Kiefer Sutherland

Synopsis:. A slave-turned-gladiator finds himself in a race against time to save his true love, who has been betrothed to a corrupt Roman Senator. As Mount Vesuvius erupts, he must fight to save his beloved as Pompeii crumbles around him

 

*Reviewer Note:  This is a spoiler free review as always.*

 

Pompeii isn’t necessarily based on a true story but it is based on the historical event of Mount Vesuvius erupting and basically destroying the city of Pompeii and its citizens.  Director Paul W.S. Anderson (The Resident Evil Franchise) takes this historical event and makes it a backdrop to his love story and gladiator movie.

The movie follows Milo (Harington aka Jon Snow), who as a boy watched his family and village get murdered by Romans lead by Roman senator Corvus (Sutherland).  Being the only survivor, he gets taken and is raised into slavery in Britannia where he fights as a gladiator under the name “The Celt.”  Milo is then shipped off to Pompeii where he will fight in the arena against the prized gladiator Atticus (Akinnuoye-Agbaje) for the seaside town’s wealthy citizens.

Along the way, Milo meets Cassia (Browning), the daughter of a wealthy, politically-minded Pompeii merchant (Harris) who wants his city to be a great one.  Cassia returns to her home of Pompeii after being in Rome for over a year.  Unbeknownst to her, her father has invited some people from Rome to help him improve his city. Leading the Roman visitors is Corvus, who has had some encounters with Cassia in Rome.  During all this, Mount Vesuvius is slowly ready to blow

The movie isn’t really that bad.  It takes elements from some other movies like Gladiator and Titanic, but it does try to be its own thing. The love plot is what drives the story of Milo and Cassia but even with their brief encounters, their story goes into full swing when the mountain erupts.  It’s the gladiator storyline that takes the majority of the movie and actually leads into the destruction of Pompeii.

Harington does a fine job with his first lead-starring role. Harington plays Milo as a man who lets his actions do the talking for him. He has the ability make Milo a killing machine to a man that will give a woman, Cassia, a loving look.  Speaking of Cassia, Emily Browning gives Cassia some likeable traits but still ends up becoming the damsel-in-distress. Her parent actors Harris and Carrie-Anne Moss don’t really serve the movie much expect for moving the political aspect of the movie, which is literally about ten minutes.  Jessica Lucas pops up as Cassis’s friend/handmaiden as well but, again, doesn’t do much.

Next to Harington, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje’s Atticus shares the most screen time where he serves as a rival turned friend and gladiator looking for his freedom. Dare I say, he might be the fan favorite by the end.  Kiefer Sutherland’s villain chews up his scenes and is just bad for almost no reason, but it’s Sutherland so I was okay with it.

But, the big thing the movie pushes for is the destruction of Pompeii, and for those wondering if the movie is going to push the destruction until the very end you’ll be happy to know the volcano erupts around the midway point of the movie.  Some of the volcanic destruction set-pieces are impressive, but some just fall flat.

All in all, Pompeii isn’t that original but will probably still manage to at least keep you entertained until the very end. Beside the volcanic eruption that we wait for, the gladiator aspect of the film is probably the highlight of the movie.

 

Pompeii

3 out of 5