‘Point Break’ Review

point_break

Director: Ericson Core

Writers: Kurt Wimmer

Cast: Luke Bracey, Edgar Ramirez, Teresa Palmer, Clemens Schick, Matias Varela, Tobias Santelmann, Nikolai Kinski, Max Thieriot, Ray Winstone and Delroy Lindo

Synopsis: A young FBI agent infiltrates an extraordinary team of extreme sports athletes he suspects of masterminding a string of unprecedented, sophisticated corporate heists.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

I’m sure I have posted this in the past: I don’t mind remakes/reboots/reimagining’s. It’s bound to happen people, get over it. Hollywood has been redoing stuff for years, but even I’ll agree that it is happening more than usual, and even more noticeable because of the internet. That’s one reason I don’t get upset or throw a hissing fit when a remake is announced. The other reason is that I always give movies the benefit of the doubt. I don’t mind remakes/reboots/reimagining’s if the team behind it does something that makes that movie worthwhile and makes the movie its own thing, and that I can respect. However, some of those movies don’t follow that logic, which is why most remakes suck. That can be said for Point Break.

Point Break takes most of the core story of the original 1991 Point Break in that it follows Johnny Utah – although Utah is a nickname this time around – who is a former extreme sports athlete who has left that world and is now trying to work his way up the FBI. When we meet him, he and the FBI find out that a group of thieves are using extreme sports-like qualities as their getaways, which leads Utah to believe they are indeed extreme sports athletes. This finding eventually lead him to tell FBI Instructor Hall (Lindo) that he thinks they are trying complete The Ozaki Eight, a fictional series of eight ordeals that intend to honor the forces of nature and give back to the world, of course the group’s way of giving back to the world is targeting big banks and giving the money to the poor. Hall, after some convincing, sends Utah to track them down and use his former extreme sports skills to weave his way in and take them down.

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One of the biggest difference between this and the original is that the remake is much more of a globe-trotting film with bigger stunts and bigger set-pieces. Some of which are okay, but don’t really move the story forward, they’re just there for the sake of having an extreme sports scene, like snowboarding down a dangerous mountain, or surfing a massive wave. The group of thieves, lead by the charismatic and dangerous Bodhi (Ramirez), are also much more than surfers this time around, which sort of adds, well, is supposed to add an extra layer of depth, but the group is interchangeable and none of them really standout. The only ones that really ever get significant screen time is Clemens Schick’s Roach and Mathias Varela’s Grommet, and while the actors do just fine, Bodhi is the one that gets the more meaty scenes.

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Clemens Schick’s Roach (left) and Mathias Varela’s Grommet (right)

The only real standout to the cast is Edgar Ramirez. He’s always reliable in everything he does really, and he does the best he can with what he’s given. Luke Bracey is rather blah, he has moments, but for the most part, he’s not that great of a lead. Teresa Palmer’s Samsara, the only woman in the core cast doesn’t really do too much and the brief love story feels a bit forced and doesn’t really carry any real weight to it. It’s kind of shame really because Palmer is a great actress and is wasted here. Ray Winstone pops u as Pappas, who also has his moments and alongside Ramirez, Winstone is a standout too.

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Point Break also feels a bit longer than it really is. The whole middle of the film is rather slow and nothing really happens aside from the really pointless big stunts. In fact, when Utah enters the group, they don’t steal anything! They sit around talking and bond, but the bonding has no real effect like the original did. Utah’s struggle to betray the group after he’s gotten to know them, doesn’t really exists, and whatever is there passes over fairly quick.

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What the movie also fails to do is really capitalize on what the original did. The iconic moments, like the presidents masks, which only appears once in security cameras, and the other two big moments from the original do appear, but they feel a bit forced and corny. Those moments make the remake feel shallower than it already is.

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All in all, Point Break doesn’t bring anything really new or good to the table. The cast is serviceable with the expectation of Edgar Ramirez, who is the real highlight of the film. The big stunts and bigger set-pieces do nothing for the sake of story and are just there to make the film probably feel more “extreme.” Despite my slight optimism for the film – and for remakes in general – Point Break fails for the most part on all spectrums.

 

Point Break

2.5 out of 5

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