Favorites of 2019: Directors, Actors, Actresses, Supporting Roles & Villains

The end of the year doesn’t just mean putting out your best/favorite movies of year. It can be a time to also reflect the individuals like directors, actors, actress, supporting roles, villains and everything in between. So, that said, I’m here to do just that. We all have our favorites, and these are mine. This is of course my opinion. I tried to shorten the list as much as I could, but like every year, it was a bit too hard so I left the lists as such.

 

Also, villains are probably considered Supporting Actors/Actress in other lists, but again, to not only make the lists shorter, I want the villains to have their own category, because everyone loves a good villain, right?

 

Finally, everything and everyone will be in alphabetical order. Also, if someone is missing, it could be because I didn’t see them (aka missed the movie), or they just missed the list/had to be cut out. This is also part one of two different lists. Enjoy.

 

Directors

Anthony and Joe Russo – Avengers: Endgame

Ari Aster – Midsommar

Bong Joon-Ho – Parasite

Jordan Peele – Us

Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett – Ready or Not

Rian Johnson – Knives Out

 

Honorable Mentions

Craig Brewer – Dolemite Is My Name

Greta Gerwig – Little Women

Olivia Wilde – Booksmart

Martin Scorsese – The Irishman

Melina Matsoukas – Queen & Slim

Quentin Tarantino – Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood

Robert Eggers – The Lighthouse

Taika Waititi – Jojo Rabbit

 

Other Notable Directors

David F. Sandberg – Shazam!

Clint Eastwood – Richard Jewell

James Mangold – Ford v Ferrari

Lulu Wang – The Farewell

Marielle Heller – A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

Mike Flanagan – Doctor Sleep

Robert Rodriguez – Alita: Battle Angel

Rob Letterman – Pokemon Detective Pikachu

 

 

Actors

Daniel Craig as Benoit Blanc – Knives Out

Dwayne Johnson as Hobbs & Jason Statham as Shaw – Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

Eddie Murphy as Rudy – Dolemite Is My Name

James Badge Dale as Gannon – The Standoff at Sparrow Creek

Joaquin Phoenix as Arthur Fleck – Joker

Leonardo DiCaprio as Rick Dalton – Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood

Paul Walter Hauser as Richard Jewell – Richard Jewell

Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark/Iron Man – Avengers: Endgame

 

Honorable Mentions

Christian Bale as Ken Miles – Ford v Ferrari

Daniel Kaluuya as Slim – Queen & Slim

Himesh Patel as Jack Malik – Yesterday

Robert De Niro as Frank Sheeran – The Irishman

Roman Griffin Davis as Jojo – Jojo Rabbit

Willem Dafoe as Thomas Wake – The Lighthouse

Zack Gottsagen as Zak – The Peanut Butter Falcon

 

Other Notable Actors

Brad Pitt as Roy McBride – Ad Astra

Jack Lowden as Zak Knight – Fighting with My Family

Jack Reynor as Christian – Midsommar

Mena Massoud as Aladdin – Aladdin

Pierfrancesco Favino as Tommaso Buscetta – The Traitor

Tom Holland as Peter Parker/Spider-Man – Spider-Man: Far from Home

Vivelk Kaira as Javed – Blinded by the Light

Winston Duke as Gabe Wilson – Us

 

 

Actress

Awkwafina as Billi – The Farewell

Charlize Theron as Megyn Kelly – Bombshell

Emma Thompson as Katherine Newbury – Late Night

Florence Pugh as Dani – Midsommar

Jodie Turner-Smith as Queen – Queen & Slim

Kaitlyn Dever as Amy & Beanie Feldstein as Molly – Booksmart

Lupita Nyong’o as Adelaide Wilson/Red – Us

Naomi Scott as Jasmine – Aladdin

Samara Weaving as Grace – Ready or Not

Saoirse Ronan as Jo March – Little Women

 

Honorable Mentions

Ana de Armas as Marta Cabrera – Knives Out

Charlize Theron as Charlotte Field – Long Shot

Elle Fanning as Violet – Teen Spirit

Florence Pugh as Saraya Knight/Paige – Fighting with My Family

Jessica Rothe as Tree – Happy Death Day 2U

Julianne Moore as Gloria – Gloria Bell

Mackenzie Davis as Grace – Terminator: Dark Fate

Rosa Salazar as Alita – Alita: Battle Angel

Thomasin McKenzie as Elsa – Jojo Rabbit

 

Other Notable Actress

Cate Blanchett as Bernadette Fox – Where’d You Go, Bernadette

Jillian Bell as Brittany – Brittany Runs a Marathon

Joanna Kulig as Zula – Cold War

Kyleigh Curran as Abra Stone – Doctor Sleep

Mckenna Grace as Judy Warren & Madison Iseman as Mary Ellen – Annabelle Comes Home

Sarah Paulson as Dr. Ellie Staple – Glass

Sophia Lillis as Nancy Drew – Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase

Vanessa Kirby as Hattie – Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

Zoe Margaret Colletti as Stella Nicholls – Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

 

 

Supporting Actor

Brad Pitt as Cliff Booth – Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood

Chris Evans as Ransom Drysdale – Knives Out

Jack Dylan Grazer as Freddy Freeman – Shazam!

James McAvoy as The Horde – Glass

James Ransone as Eddie Kaspbrak & Bill Hader as Richie Tozier – It Chapter Two

Tom Hanks as Fred Rogers – A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

 

Honorable Mentions

Alessandro Nivola as Sensei – The Art of Self Defense

Al Pacino as Jimmy Hoffa – The Irishman

Bokeem Woodbine as Uncle Earl – Queen & Slim

Chris Hemsworth as Thor – Avengers: Endgame

Happy Anderson as Morris – The Standoff at Sparrow Creek

Nick Nolte as Clay Banning – Angel Has Fallen

Navid Mohammadzadeh as Naser Khakzad – Just 6.5

Sam Rockwell as Captain Klenzendorf – Jojo Rabbit

Taika Waititi as Adolf – Jojo Rabbit

Will Smith as Genie/Mariner – Aladdin

 

Other Notable Supporting Actors

Adam Brody as Daniel – Ready or Not

Dean Chaumoo as Bedders & Angus Imrie as Young Merlin – The Kid Who Would Be King

Ken Watanabe as Dr. Ishiro Serizawa – Godzilla: King of the Monsters

Kulvinder Ghir as Malik – Blinded by the Light

Joe Pesci as Russell Bufalino – The Irishman

Phi Vu as Ryan – Happy Death Day 2U

Raymond Cruz as Rafael Olvera – The Curse of La Llorona

Wesley Snipes as D’Urville Martin – Dolemite Is My Name

 

 

Supporting Actress

Billie Lourd as Gigi – Booksmart

Florence Pugh as Amy March – Little Women

Julia Butters as Trudi – Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood

Shuzhen Zhao as Nai Nai – The Farewell

Zoey Deutch as Madison – Zombieland: Double Tap

 

Honorable Mentions

Elisabeth Moss as Claire Walsh – The Kitchen

Faithe Herman as Darla Dudley – Shazam!

Kathy Bates as Bobi Jewell – Richard Jewell

Katie Sarife as Daniela – Annabelle Comes Home

Scarlett Johansson as Rosie – Jojo Rabbit

 

Other Notable Supporting Actresses

Eliza Scanlen as Beth March – Little Women

Helen Mirren as Queenie – Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

Nasim Pedrad as Dalia – Aladdin

Margot Robbie as Kayla Pospisil – Bombshell

Melanie Scrofano as Emilie – Ready or Not

 

 

Villains

Baba Yaga – Hellboy

Bill Skarsgard as Pennywise – It Chapter Two

Henry Czerny as Tony & Nicky Guadagni as Aunt Helene – Ready or Not

Jake Gyllenhaal as Quentin Beck/Mysterio – Spider-Man: Far from Home

Lupita Nyong’o as Red – Us

Rebecca Ferguson as Rose the Hat – Doctor Sleep

 

Honorable Mentions

Asia Kate Dillon as The Adjudicator – John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

Gabriel Luna as Rev-9 – Terminator: Dark Fate

Jackson A. Dunn as Brandon Breyer – Brightburn

Octavia Spencer as Sue Ann – Ma

Marisol Ramirez as La Llorona – The Curse of La Llorona

Mark Dacascos as Zero – John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

The Seven Deadly Sins – Shazam!

 

Other Notable Villains

Alligators – Crawl

Idris Elba as Brixton – Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

King Ghidorah – Godzilla: King of the Monsters

Josh Brolin as Thanos – Avengers: Endgame

 

Be on the lookout for Part II coming.

‘It Chapter Two’ Review

Director: Andy Muschietti

Writer: Gary Dauberman

Cast: Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, Bill Hader, Isaiah Mustafa, Jay Ryan, James Ransone, Bill Skarsgard, Jaden Martell, Wyatt Oleff, Jack Dylan Grazer, Chosen Jacobs, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Teach Grant, Andy Bean, Sophia Lillis and Finn Wolfhard

Synopsis: Twenty-seven years after their first encounter with the terrifying Pennywise, the Losers Club have grown up and moved away, until a devastating phone call brings them back.

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

It’s – no pun intended – finally here! The much anticipated ending to the horror hit based on the classic and acclaimed novel by Stephen King, It. While the 2017 split some fans of the original TV movie with Tim Curry playing the famed Pennywise, the dancing clown, director Andy Muschietti (Mama) had some more room to play with. For one, this was not a TV movie, and it was rated-R, so blood, gore and foul language was on the table. Plus, if you stop anyone on the street and ask them about Pennywise or It, they would most likely know what you’re talking about.

I, for one, really enjoyed and liked Chapter One. The young cast was amazing and Bill Skarsgard’s Pennywise was frightening on every single level he had to be. So needless to the say, I was looking forward to Chapter Two, especially with its adult cast being pretty damn impressive, and the promise it was going to up the ante. So, does It Chapter Two live up to the hype? Or does it sink deep into the sewers?

It Chapter Two starts out pretty rough with a scene that is in the book, but still doesn’t make it easy to watch play out. It also shows us that Pennywise is still truly alive ready to rein terror again in Derry. Pennywise’s return sparks Mike (Isaiah Mustafa), who never left Derry, to call the Losers Club to return to Derry to defeat Pennywise for good, just like the promised at the end of the last film. Each of the Losers have gone on and made a good to great life for themselves. Bill (James McAvoy) is a well-known writer, whose last book is getting made into a movie, Richie (Bill Hader) is a famous stand-up comic, Ben (Jay Ryan) has become some successful businessman, and is now skinny, Eddie (James Ransone) is a risk analyst, Stanley (Andy Bean) is happily married and Beverly (Jessica Chastain) is a wealthy, but also still can’t escape an abusive man in her life.

When they finally get together, they catch up on their lives and the memories of their time in Derry start to come back, and then they all admit when they got the call from Mike, they felt fear. That fear is because they remember the man that gave them that fear, Pennywise. What starts is a series of horrifying events that target the Losers Club, and what leads to an epic final fight against Pennywise.

Of course, the big thing everyone is talking about is the runtime of It Chapter Two. The film runs at a lengthy two-hours and forty-nine minutes, and thankfully, for the most part you don’t really feel it too much, at least I didn’t. The beginning of the film is a little slow to start, but once the Losers get together, the movie moves to its epic finale, which admittedly, drags on just a bit, and is a bit too CG. Regardless of how you feel about the length, you have to give it to director Andy Muschietti and returning screenwriter Gary Dauberman (the Annabelle movies, The Nun) for stuffing the movie with more mythology on Pennywise, content and some ambitious moves. Unfortunately, the scope of It Chapter Two is just a bit too big and does lead to some unevenness throughout.

Given those problems, it’s made up through the cast. The adult cast are all great, and they really do feel like the adult versions of their younger counterparts. McAvoy’s Bill is still haunted by Georgie’s death, Chastain’s Beverly has a more nuanced and quieter performance, Mustafa’s Mike is a bit cagey since he’s never left Derry, Ryan’s Ben still pines over Beverly, and then you have the highlights of the cast in Hader and Ransone. Hader’s Richie is getting more of the love online, and it’s deserved, but for me Ransone deserves the same amount of praise, maybe even a little more.

Obviously, with Hader being attached, the humor/comedy was bound to be high, and that’s exactly what it was. Hader’s Richie is pretty much always on, which may or may not get a little tiring every now and then, but Ransone also gets his time to shine on the humor. After seeing the film, I honestly want to see Hader and Ransone reunite somewhere down the road. That said, Hader’s Richie has a subplot here that is nicely done and not heavy-handed.

Undoubtedly, the thing everyone probably wants to know is if It Chapter Two is scary. For the most part, I think so. It’s more or less of the same scares we got in It, with some jump scares and some well-time moments with Pennywise or other ghoulish beings. There also a pitch-perfect homage to another classic horror film that had me grinning from ear-to-ear while watching. That said, the movie is also pretty emotional. No seriously, I was at one point at the verge of tears, which is something I was not ready for watching a horror movie.

All in all, It Chapter Two is a worthy enough sequel, and while the sequel does get a bit too ambitious for its own good, the adult cast really holds the film together. The scares are upped, and Bill Skarsgard’s Pennywise is certified to be a new horror staple. I can’t really say that It Chapter Two is better than It, but if you were a fan of the first film, you should enjoy or like Chapter Two.

Also, keep an eye out for some great Easter Eggs and cameos!

It Chapter Two

4 out of 5

‘Power Rangers’ Review

Director: Dean Israelite

Writer: John Gatins

Cast: Dacre Montgomery, Naomi Scott, RJ Cyler, Ludi Lin, Becky G., Elizabeth Banks, Bill Hader, David Denman and Bryan Cranston

Synopsis: A group of high-school kids, who are infused with unique superpowers, harness their abilities in order to save the world.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

*Reviewer Note 2: There is a post-credit scene.*

 

Power Rangers, if you’re like me and of the same age, that means something to you. Of course, the Power Rangers have gone through different incarnations since 1993, but that should show you that, not only is the brand still going strong, but it has a connection with people of every age. So when word broke that Hollywood was taking another stab at a big screen version of the Power Rangers, fans were concerned, intrigued and happy to see where this would go. So, does this new version of the Power Rangers work? Yes, yes it does.

Like mostly every incarnation of the heroes, the film follows five teenagers who are misfits in their own way. There’s Jason (Dacre Montgomery), a now former football star who gets into an accident at the beginning of the film ruining the school’s chances of a championship; Billy (RJ Cyler), who is mildly autistic in this version; Kimberly, the popular one who now finds herself outside her popularity; Zack (Ludi Lin), who is a bit of an adrenaline junkie and is a caregiver for his mother; and Trini (Becky G), the new girl who doesn’t fit in with her “normal” parents.

One night all of them come together, by chance, and find mysterious colored coins which end up giving them special abilities. When they go back to the site they found the coins, they find an abandoned spaceship where they meet the android Alpha 5 (voiced by Bill Hader) and Zordon (Bryan Cranston), who tells them they have been chosen to be the Power Rangers. Moreover, they have to train because the evil force of Rita Repulsa (Elizabeth Banks) has risen again and is in search of the powerful Zeo Crystals to destroy the world.

Power Rangers takes the basic premise of the first series – well, the American one anyway – and pulls concepts from other incarnations to reboot the whole thing and make it more modern and change the mythology we all know and love, which surprisingly works. The film feels like a mix of The Breakfast Club and Chronicle, but the story and characters stand on their own. Sure they have to save the world, but the characters try to find themselves amongst strangers, a mysterious head in a wall and a weird looking robot. Their journey is what keeps us engaged until we see them suit up. It’s a story that we can probably all connect to in our own way, but it’s the cast that makes it worth it.

For a group of relative unknowns, they did an awesome job making us by their characters. Dacre Montgomery’s Jason isn’t the typical jock although buying him as the leader was a little hard to buy at first, Naomi Scott’s Kimberly isn’t the Kimberly we all remember but carries something with her, Ludi Lin’s Zack is completely different from what we remember, but the caretaker aspect is an interesting one, Becky G’s Trini is the much talked about LGBTQ character, and while I was turned off by her attitude at first, she grew on me as the film went on. RJ Cyler’s Billy will undoubtedly be a fan favorite, and arguably is the heart of the film along with Bill Hader’s Alpha 5, which design is much better and less distracting once you see it move around. Bryan Cranston’s Zordon is perfect, but it’s Elizabeth Banks who fails on some levels. While she’s a bit of wildcard in terms of you never know what she’s going to do, she doesn’t really feel like a villain until the end. It’s nothing against Banks herself, but her Rita was just a little underwhelming for me. Oh, and Goldar is, well, he’s what we see in the trailers.

The film’s tone is also great. It’s got the right amount of cheesiness, humor, coming-of-age style and realness a new modern version Power Rangers needed. Sometimes the tone can be all over the place, but overall it’s pretty spot on. One scene, that is a great scene, but it came at a weird place is when the team start to really get to know each other. One complaint I know many will have is the amount of time the group have in the actual Ranger suits. It doesn’t come until the final act of the film, but I would say the team does deserve to earn the suits, which makes the wait for it to actually happen worth it.

All in all, Power Rangers is a great film for fans of the Power Rangers. The cast is great, the tone is spot on for the majority of the film along with the cheesiness the film needs. Also, for a film that is over two hours, it went by like a breeze. It’s also a great way to introduce new fans to the group of heroes we all loved as kids – and maybe even still to this day. It’s morphin’ time!

Power Rangers

4.5 out of 5

New Podcast: Ghost in the Shell TV Spots, Will Rogue One Make The Force Awakens Money? & More

The podcast is up!

I have a quick special guest on the podcast this week talking about Ghost in the Shell.

Enjoy.

‘Sausage Party’ Review

sausage_party

Director: Greg Tiernan and Conrad Vernon

Writers: Kyle Hunter, Ariel Shaffir, Seth Rogen, and Evan Goldberg

Voice Cast: Seth Rogen, Kristen Wiig, Edward Norton, David Krumholtz, Nick Kroll, Salma Hayek, Jonah Hill, Michael Cera, Danny McBride, Craig Robinson, Bill Hader, Paul Rudd, and James Franco

Synopsis: A sausage strives to discover the truth about his existence.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

I’m just going to start off by saying; this is one of the most ridiculous movies I’ve ever seen, and it probably has to do with the fact that it’s an R-rated animated film from Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg. However, there is surprisingly a lot more to Sausage Party than the ads will have you believe. While the selling hook is “food finds out what happens when they really go home with humans,” the film takes a rather strong approach to something that is controversial to talk about: religion.

Sausage Party follows the food at a Shopwell supermarket, who every morning, sing – yes – sing about their hopes of being picked by the gods (humans) so they can go to the “Great Beyond” (outside the supermarket). The main focus is Frank (Rogen), a hot dog, who believes that he’ll finally be chosen on Red, White and Blue Day, and that his girlfriend Brenda (Wiig), hotdog bun) will go with him. Not being able to wait too long, they stick their hands out and “touch tips.” However, when they do get picked, they get into a shopping cart accident that leaves them and Douche (Kroll) – yes a Douche – falling back into the aisle, and getting left behind and unable to see The Great Beyond.

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What follows is Frank figuring out what really happens to food when they go to the Great Beyond, which questions everything he, Brenda, Douche and everyone else thinks about the “gods.” Meanwhile, Frank’s friend Barry (Cera), who stayed in the cart, gets a firsthand experience of what happens when you really go come to the gods, and has his own adventure.

Like I mentioned, this is one of the most ridiculous movies I’ve ever seen, and you guys know I watch a lot of movies. I really didn’t even know how I was going to review this without spoiling something or just ruining the experience for you guys. I will say the death scenes (?) are somewhat disturbing to watch, but in a good and funny way. They do come off like a horror movie, but you can’t help but laugh along with them because they are so creative, and you never get old which is a huge plus. There are moments in the film that will leave you questioning where the film is going, but then they hit with another big joke that makes you seem to forget that.

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Also, like I mentioned, the film tackles a surprising subject in religion. I don’t get to into how they approach it, but it was surprising that Rogen, Goldberg, Shaffir, and Hunter went in that direction. They could have easily went the easy route of food freaking the hell out about finding out they actually get eaten when the go to the “Great Beyond” by their “Gods.” But just because we know Rogen and Goldberg for doing stoner comedies, it doesn’t mean the film is an atheist film. It actually brings up a worthy conversation, and doesn’t just dismiss it. It does to some extent, but it loops it back around in the end to give you the two points. Of course, all that only matters if you are either a religious person or at least know and understand some aspects of it.

So Sausage Party gets points in my book for doing something comes out of left field that I’m pretty sure no one saw coming. It also has some comedic political jokes that got a good laugh out of my showing. That isn’t to say the film isn’t funny, there are some great jokes throughout the whole film, and is one of the funniest films of the year so far. Is it for everyone? Hell no! One reason is definitely a scene at the end of the film that I won’t even tease, but if you saw the film you know what I’m talking about, and if you watch the film, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about. It’s uncomfortably long, but in a way that makes sense for the film.

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Brenda (Kristen Wiig), Sammy (Edward Norton), Lavash (David Krumholtz), and Teresa (Salma Hayek)

All in all, Sausage Party is not for everyone, but you should know what you are expecting considering Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg are involved. The film is something else that I’m sure most people watching will find odd, but it somewhat works for the film. The voice cast is spot on, and Sausage Party will definitely have you thinking twice about the food you eat later that day. Did I mention it was ridiculous?

Sausage Party

4 out of 5

‘The BFG’ Review

bfg

Director: Steven Spielberg

Writer: Melissa Mathison

Cast: Ruby Barnhill, Mark Rylance, Penelope Wilson, Jemaine Clement, Rebecca Hall, Rafe Spall, and Bill Hader

Synopsis: A girl named Sophie encounters the Big Friendly Giant who, despite his intimidating appearance, turns out to be a kindhearted soul who is considered an outcast by the other giants because, unlike them, he refuses to eat children.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Looking back, I have actually never read Roald Dahl’s The BFG, which is a shame because I know a lot of people my age that have and have loved it. So I feel like I’m missing out, but reading other Dahl’s work I’m sure the world is as great as his other works like “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” and “Matilda.” While there is another version of The BFG out there, another version with Steven Spielberg had been kicking around Hollywood, but it wasn’t until now that they decided to pull the trigger and bring us a great world and filled with two great characters. Not only that, this is the last film screenwriter Melissa Mathison – she also did E.T. – worked on before she sadly passed away.

The BFG follows Sophie, played by newcomer Ruby Barnhill, an orphan living in London, who one night spots a giant (Oscar winner Mark Rylance) outside her window. The giant, also spotting her, snatches her away and takes her to Giant Country. While there, she tries to escape but soon realizes that the giant isn’t as bad as stories have them to be, and eventually calls him “BFG” for Big Friendly Giant. Not only that, BFG is the runt of a band of brothers that are massively bigger than him, and are cannibalistic. Sophie, seeing the good in BFG, tries to devise a plan to stop the other giants and help The BFG’s life.

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While I did enjoy The BFG, there is a pacing issue right smack dab in the middle of the film, and the final big moment of the film between Sophie, BFG, and the other giants is a bit anti-climatic for me. However, what keeps the film going is definitely the chemistry between leads Barnhill and Rylance. The two are unbelievable together and are truly the best part of the whole film.

Rylance became a bit of a household name after nabbing the Oscar for his work in Bridge of Spies (also directed by Spielberg), and is once again magnificent here as BFG. Even under all the CGI, Rylance gives a great performance, and kudos goes to Barnhill, making her film debut in not just a big budget Hollywood film, but a Spielberg film at that. Most of film is the two interacting with each other and BFG showing her what he does for a living of collecting dreams. That is where Spielberg ups the fantasy aspect and leads to some great shots of Sophie running around chasing small colorful orbs.

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The mean giants, which all have weird names like Bloodbottler, Bonecruncher, Childchewer, Gizzardgulper, Meatdripper, Butcher Boy, and the leader of the group Fleshlumpeater (voiced by Jemaine Clement), don’t get a ton of screen time, so when it comes to them, they are arguably one of the  weaker parts of the film. The rest of the human supporting cast comes in the form of Penelope Wilton playing The Queen, her head of security Mr. Tibbs (Spall) and assistant Mary (Hall). All of them play their part well, and are involved in one of the best and humorous scenes of the film.

All in all, The BFG is a great magical adventure that is held together by leads Mark Rylance and Ruby Barnhill. The film does have some pacing some issues but overall, The BFG is a great time to be had.

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The BFG

4 out of 5