My Best/Favorite Movies of 2015

I held out to put my list for a few films and I had yet to see that would have – and did – make it. So, forgive me for putting out the list late.

So, there were some great films that came out this year. The list really ranges all over the place, so you’ll see a wide array of titles, and even some surprises. But, of course, this is my list and my opinion so your list might be different, obviously, it is okay.

The list will have the films in alphabetical order, just to be fair, and because I really don’t want to go through the trouble anymore of picking a number one because it would be really tough. First let’s start off with the film that I didn’t get around to watching, whether it’s because I missed out when it was in theaters, or because they were only in theaters in my area for a short time, or because they were on a very limited release (I’m looking at you The Reverent) then we’ll move to the films that just missed the list, honorable mentions and then the big one.

 

Movies I Missed That I Wanted to Watch

A Girl Walks Home Along At Night

Amy

Anomalisa

Beasts of No Nation

Black Sea

Carol

Daddy’s Home

Faults

Goodnight Mommy

Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter

Mistress America

REC 4: Apocalypse

Selma

Slow West

Still Alice

The Walk

The Babadook

Trumbo

Turbo Kid

While We’re Young

Z for Zachariah

 

Just Missed The List

American Ultra (PalmStar Media/Circle of Confusion/Lionsgate/The Bridge Finance Company/Likely Story/FilmNation Entertainment)

Bridge of Spies (Dreamworks/Amblin Entertainment/Fox 2000 Pictures/Participant Media/Reliance Entertainment/TSG Entertainment/Marc Platt Productions)

Chappie (Sony Pictures/Columbia Pictures/Media Rights Capital/Simon Kinberg Productions/LStar Capital)

In the Heart of the Sea (Warner Bros./Village Roadshow Pictures/Imagine Entertainment/Spring Creek Productions)

Joy (Fox 2000/Annapurna Pictures/Davis Entertainment/TSG Entertainment)

Krampus (Universal Pictures/Legendary Pictures)

Legend (Universal Pictures/Cross Creek Picures/Working Title Films)

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trails (20th Century Fox/TSG Entertainment/Temple Hill Entertainment)

Run All Night (Warner Bros./RatPac-Dune Entertainment/Vertigo Entertainment)

Southpaw (The Weinstein Company/Escape Artists/Fuqua Films/Riche Productions)

Trainwreck (Universal Pictures/Apatow Productions/Denstu)

The Good Dinosaur (Disney Pictures/Pixar Animation Studios)

The Night Before (Sony Pictures/Columbia Pictures/LStar Capital/Point Grey Pictures/Good Universe)

Victoria (Adopt Films/Radical Media/MonkeyBoy/Deutschfilm/Westdeutscher Rundunk)

 

 

Honorable Mentions

[Wild (Fox Searchlight/Pacific Standard)]

Wild is technically a 2014 film, but I didn’t watch until after I put out my list and the second week of January, but it’s such a great film to not mention on a best of lists.

 

A Most Violent Year (A24/Participant Media/Before The Door Pictures/FilmNation Entertainment)

Two of the best working today in Oscar Isaac and Jessica Chastain led this drama that is a one of those films that simply relies on the actors delivering and that is what A Most Violent Year does.

 

American Sniper (Warner Bros./Village Roadshow/RatPac-Dune Entertainment)

Clint Eastwood directed and Bradley Cooper-led film about the true story, well depending on who you ask, about one of most deadly snipers in Navy SEAL history Chris Kyle. The film is put on the shoulders of Cooper who handles it perfectly.

 

Black Mass (Warner Bros./RatPac-Dune Entertainment/Cross Creek Pictures/Free State Pictures/Head Gear Films)

While the film was just okay, it’s the performances that elevated the film enough for me to make Black Mass enough to pop in the list. Even if you didn’t like the film, you have to give credit to the awesome performance by Johnny Depp as James “Whitey” Bulger and Joel Edgerton.

 

Crimson Peak (Universal Pictures/Legendary Pictures)

Being a huge fan of Guillermo del Toro, I was looking forward to watching Crimson Peak especially knowing how del Toro put into the film. Actually making Allerdale Hall and making actually come to life is what made Crimson Peak work so well.

 

Focus (Warner Bros./RatPac-Dune Entertainment/Zaftig Films/Kramer & Sigman Films)

Focus was rather surprising to me. The trailers really didn’t do too much for me and I thought the film looked rather boring to be honest. But, let this be a lesson boys and girls, sometimes a good or descent movie can have a crappy trailer. I did love the first half much more than the second half, especially with a standout scene that involves an unrecognizable BD Wong.

 

Goosebumps (Sony Pictures/Sony Pictures Animation/Village Roadshow Pictures/Columbia Pictures/LStar Capital/Original Film/Scholastic Entertainment)

I wasn’t really expecting much from Goosebumps, but I was highly surprised to how good it was and how much I thoroughly enjoyed it. It wasn’t just a fun family movie, it was just a fun movie all around.

 

Inherent Vice (Warner Bros./IAC Films/Ghoulardi Film Company/KVH Media Group)

Paul Thomas Anderson adapted Thomas Pynchon’s novel of the same name and it was, well, interesting. The crime comedy drama gave some standout performances by Joaquin Phoenix, Josh Brolin, and Katherine Waterston, but it is rather interesting story and how it plays out is all over the place.

 

It Follows (RADiUS-TWC/Animal Kingdom/Northern Lights Films/Two Flints)

I’d only heard some good things about It Follows before I actually watched the movie, and it is one of the rare cases that I didn’t watch the trailer and went in completely blind, so to speak, and I’m glad I did. It Follows felt like an old-school horror film that relied more on playing with your senses and paranoia than with gore and cheap thrills.

 

Pixels (Sony Pictures/Columbia Pictures/Happy Madison Productions/1492 Pictures/China Film Co.)

I know, I can’t believe it either, but Pixels was damn enjoyable. I didn’t think I would like it to be honest, and while it wasn’t perfect and some things felt forced or just didn’t work (like some casting), Pixels was filled with great stuff and the heavily promoted Pac-Man chase was much more fun to experience as a whole sequences. Also, I was surprised by how the special effects worked and they didn’t cut corners.

 

Spotlight (Open Road Films/Participant Media/Anonymous Content)

Focusing of The Boston Globe when they uncovered the huge scandal of child molestation and the cover-up by the Catholic Church in Boston, the film was jam-packed with a great cast and equally great performances by the cast that highlighted by Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton, Brian d’Arcy James and Stanley Tucci. There was something so simple about the film, yet so special to experience.

 

Straight Outta Compton (Universal Pictures/Legendary Pictures/New Line Cinema/Cube Vision/Circle of Confusion)

Straight Outta Compton surprised a lot of people and rightfully so as the film came out a lot better than what people were suspecting. Filled with great performances by Corey Hawkins as Dr. Dre, O’Shea Jackson Jr. playing his father Ice Cube, Paul Giamatti as Jerry Heller, and the standout in Jason Mitchell as Eazy-E, the film is easily one of the best of the year, but honestly was a bit too long for my own liking, and I’m the last person to complain about a film’s length.

 

The Gift (STX Entertainment/Blumhouse Productions/Blue-Tongue Films/Huayi Brothers Media)

Joel Edgerton steps behind the camera for this one, making his feature directorial debut, but also playing one of three main characters in the film. The Gift may be one of the overlooked films of the year, but the film does have some great moments of suspense and mystery and an ending that I didn’t see coming.

 

Sicario (Lionsgate/Black Label Media/Thunder Road Pictures)

Director Denis Villeneuve and cinematographer Roger Deakins put together this great tense, dark and unapologetic film about the war on drugs on the border between the U.S and Mexico. However, the standout in Sicario was definitely Benicio Del Toro.

 

Spectre (Columbia Pictures/MGM/Eon Productions/B24/Danjaq)

In what could be Daniel Craig’s last James Bond film, and director Sam Mendes’ last one as well, Spectre has a lot of things working for it, but it did fail to really capitalize on what Skyfall did before it.

 

Steve Jobs (Universal Pictures/Legendary/Scott Rudin Productions/The Mark Gordon Company)

Danny Boyle directed this interestingly laid out biopic about former Apple CEO Steve Jobs, played by Michael Fassbender. The film is blocked off in three different parts, set right before the launch presentations of three different products Jobs was a part of (none of which were the IPhone’s and IPods by the way). While the film lost some steam by the end, the performances made the film worthwhile, especially a standout scene between Fassbender and Jeff Daniels in the middle of the film.

 

The Big Short (Paramount Pictures/Regency Enterprises/Plan B Entertainment)

Tackling the housing and financial crisis in 2005 to 2007, The Big Short is filled with great performances by its ensemble cast and directed by Adam McKay – yes, that Adam McKay – the film really puts you in there. Sometimes, it gets a little too technical that you feel like you’re going crazy and lost, but that’s kind of the point.

 

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (Warner Bros./RatPac-Dune Entertainment/Wilgram Productions/Davis Entertainment)

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. could have been a movie that got lost at the wayside, and while some will say that’s true, Guy Ritchie’s spy film worked on a lot of levels for me. It had some great and funny moments and the opening action scene and last chase scene were great fun to watch along with the performances by Henry Cavill, Armie Hammer, and Alicia Vikander.

 

 

Best/Favorite Movies of the Year

Ant-Man (Marvel Studios/Walt Disney Motion Pictures)

Ant-Man has gone through a lot. Originally it was going to be part of Marvel’s Phase 1, but got pushed back until now. Then it took a big hit in losing long-time attached director and fan in Edgar Wright. However, Peyton Reed and the cast were able to still bring a great Marvel film to the fans.

 

Avengers: Age of Ultron (Marvel Studios/Walt Disney Studios)

Even I can admit that Age of Ultron wasn’t perfect, but there was still a ton of to be had with the massive sequel. Joss Whedon was able to keep most of the craziness from going off the rails and let’s face it, Age of Ultron was probably one of the most comic book-y movies we’ve seen.

 

Brooklyn (Fox Searchlight Pictures/Wildgaze Films/Parallel Film Productions/Irish Film Board/Item 7)

A great film – also based on a novel – that tells the story of an Irish immigrant played by Saoirse Ronan that comes to America and finds love and a new life, but her past and love for her former home comes back to her, which leaves her to make a decision to accept her new life, or old one. I ended up loving this film more than I thought I would. It’s a beautiful story and told in such a way that anybody can connect with it.

 

Creed (Warner Bros./New Line Cinema/MGM/Chartoff-Winkler Productions)

Michael B. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone’s performances in Creed are one of the best aspects of the film. The film wasn’t a cheap way to get to make more films with Rocky Balboa, the film was treated with respect to the films that came before, but was also a great standalone film.

 

Dope (Open Road Films/Forest Whitaker’s Significant Productions/IamOTHER Entertainment/Revolt Films)

I didn’t really expect much from Dope, but I was pleasantly surprised by how well handled the film was and the great performance by breakout star, Shameik Moore. It’s one of films that keeps you on your feet with comedy and big dramatic moments.

 

Ex Machina (A24/Universal Pictures/DNA Films/Film4)

Alex Garland, the writer of films like 28 Days Later, Sunshine, and Dredd, finally steps behind the camera and what a way to make his debut. Garland tackled A.I. in a different take and the way they approach the story and theme was great to see unravel. Plus, Ex Machina has great performances by Domhnall Gleeson and Oscar Isaac, but an even better one by a standout performance (maybe of the year) by Alicia Vikander.

 

Furious 7 (Universal Pictures/Original Film/Media Rights Capital/One Race Film, Dentsu/Original Film)

James Wan stepped into some big shoes replacing Justin Lin, and while mostly known for his horror films, Wan completely fit into the world. Furious 7 also had some troubles along the way and felt more powerful for some with of course the death of Paul Walker during production. The film paid nice tribute to Walker and the character at the end of the film.

 

Inside Out (Walt Disney Pictures/Pixar Animation Studios)

Damn you, Pixar! How is it that one studio has their hands on all of your pulses and always find a way to make us either cry or tear up? I haven’t decided where Inside Out falls on my favorite Pixar films list, but it’s definitely up there. I mean, they made a movie about feelings. FEELINGS!

 

Jurassic World (Universal Pictures/Legendary Pictures/Amblin Entertainment)

Let’s face it, this probably shouldn’t have worked, and while some will think that it didn’t, I thought Jurassic World worked at just the right amount of levels for me to thoroughly enjoy it. Also, what’s not to love about seeing giant dinosaurs back on the big screen?

 

Kingsman: The Secret Service (20th Century Fox/Marv Films/TSG Entertainment/Cloudy Productions)

Kingsman: The Secret Service is definitely one of the biggest surprises of the year, and probably surpassed many people’s preconceived notions of the film. I mean any movie that can make Colin Firth into a badass spy should work right? Also Sofia Boutella’s Gazelle was probably one of the coolest villains of the year. But for me, what made Kingsman a standout was the awesome and chaotic church fight scene. Seriously, that scene was a thing of beauty.

 

Macbeth (The Weinstein Company/DMC Film/See-Saw Films)

Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard absolutely nail down the performances of arguably one of the most well-known literary figures and plays. Justin Kurzel brings a fresh, dark, gritty, and visually compelling adaptation and different approach to William Shakespeare’s play. Macbeth is one of those films that probably won’t grab you at first, but hits you very later on.

 

Mad Max: Fury Road (Warner Bros./Village Roadshow Pictures/Kennedy Miller Productions)

What a lovely day, indeed! Mad Max: Fury Road was essentially one long chase scene and while it did slow down a bit – rightly so – I freaking loved every minute of it. The impressive action sequences, the score, and the two main leads of Hardy as Max and Charlize Theron’s Imperator Furiosa. Definitely one of the best films of the year and probably one of, if not, the best action film of the year.

 

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (Fox Searchlight Pictures/Indian Paintbrush)

Based on the novel of the same name, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is a film that hit me hard. I loved the book and I loved what they did in the film. They were able to recreate some of humor and managed to keep the spirit of the novel, but also do their own thing which was great to watch. It’s definitely one of the best dramas of the year.

 

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation (Paramount Pictures/Bad Robot/Skydance Productions/TC Productions)

2015 was a good year for spy films, and Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation may have been one of the best of the year. Like the Fast & Furious films, it’s a little hard to believe that the Mission: Impossible films keep getting better with every passing installment. Tom Cruise still feels like he’s on top of his game and with a standout performance by Rebecca Ferguson, Rogue Nation ups the ante on the series.

 

Room (A24/Element Pictures/No Trace Camping/Film4)

Room might be one of the best dramas of the year and one that came out of nowhere. Two of the best performances of the year go to stars Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay, who give heartbreaking and heartwarming performances in a film that isn’t always easy to watch. Do yourself a favor and watch this as soon as possible.

 

Spy (20th Century Fox/Feigco Entertainment/Chernin Entertainment)

Melissa McCarthy had some misfires going on there, but thankfully she came back to form with Paul Feig – of all people – with this awesome take on the spy genre. Melissa McCarthy is as funny as ever and Jason Statham gives a gut-busting performance

 

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (Walt Disney Studios/Lucasfilm/Bad Robot/Truenorth Productions)

Out of all the movies that came out this year, this one was the most unpredictable. It could have been great or it could have been bad. Thankfully, J.J. Abrams put on a hell of a movie that makes a great addition to the Star Wars franchise. The new characters were great, the movie was a ton of fun to watch, and more importantly it was just fun.

 

The Final Girls (Stage 6 Films/Groundswell Productions/Vertical Entertainment/Ulterior Productions)

I honestly didn’t think I would have loved The Final Girls as much as I did. I thought the meta horror comedy would have some great moments, and while it does, it was the other big story in the film between Max (Taissa Farmiga) and Nancy/Amanda (Malin Akerman) that really stuck out and got to me. I didn’t imagine that I’d get emotionally invested in a horror comedy, but lo and behold I did.

 

The Peanuts Movie (20th Century Fox/Blue Sky Studios/Feigco Entertainment)

Yet another film that probably shouldn’t have worked and people had their preconceived notions on it, but The Peanuts Movie was damn enjoyable. Sure it wasn’t done in the traditional style that we all know and love, but the film didn’t add any pop culture references or pop songs. It stayed true to its roots and reminded you why you love Charlie Brown and the whole Peanuts gang.

 

The Hateful Eight (The Weinstein Company)

While the final product is still a little iffy for me, one of the reason The Hateful Eight is on the list is for the characters, setting, and production design. The cabin – Minnie’s Haberdashery – was a great looking aspect to the film and just a confined space for all these characters that it elevated the film much more. As for the characters, Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Walton Goggins are the highlights of the film that keep the slow burn mystery drama film in tact.

 

The Martian (20th Century Fox/Scott Free Productions/Genre Films/Mid Atlantic Films)

Based on the novel of the same name, The Martian was every bit as good as the novel, and maybe even more. Matt Damon is tremendous as the lead and Ridley Scott was able to make us feel like we were really on Mars and we can really sense the dread that Damon’s Mark Watney felt, but there was also beauty behind everything that was being filmed.

 

So what are some of your favorite films of 2015?

Here’s to another great year in films!

‘Bridge of Spies’ Review

bridge_of_spies

Director: Steven Spielberg

Writers: Matt Charman, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen

Cast: Tom Hanks, Mark Rylance, Alan Alda, Austin Stowell, Jesse Plemons, Jon Rue, Scott Shepherd, Dakin Matthews, Mikhail Gorevoy, Sebastian Koch, Will Rogers and Amy Ryan

Synopsis: An American lawyer is recruited by the CIA during the Cold War to help rescue a pilot detained in the Soviet Union.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

The Cold War was an important time in American, and Soviet Union, history. Both sides were at odds with each other and more importantly, both sides wanted information on the other. Steven Spielberg manages to bring some of the mindset to the big screen with his latest film Bridge of Spies, and who better to help him than someone that has proven to give him great work in the past in Tom Hanks. However, Bridges of Spies, which is based on true events, is actually composed as two films in one. One being a courtroom drama and the other being a spy thriller. The two blend together rather well, while also faltering a bit as it tries to handle a bit too much.

While the whole film is set during the height of the Civil War, the first half of Bridges of Spies follows James Donovan, a successful insurance lawyer who is suddenly picked by the government to “defend” a supposed Soviet spy in Rudolf Abel (Rylance). The idea is for Donovan to put on a show for the public and make it looks like Abel is getting a fair trial, even though he will be found guilty. However, Donovan isn’t all that thrilled with the idea since he will become a hated man and not only put himself in danger, but his family’s safety as well. But, to Donovan, there is something about Abel that intrigues him and sees that Abel isn’t really getting a fair shot, so he actually does his best to try and actually do his job much to the chagrin of his co-workers.

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The second half of Bridges of Spies follows the heavily promoted material of Hanks’ Donovan going to Berlin, thanks to the help of the CIA, to discuss and work out a trade for pilot Gary Powers (Stowell), who was shot down, for Abel. Of course, not everything goes as planned and Donovan has to worry about not only making this deal happen, but also getting back home alive.

There is no mistaking that Bridge of Spies belongs to Tom Hanks. Hanks brings his likeability and nice-guy demeanor to Donovan that not only makes his performance work well, and makes us easily root for him, but also enhances the film. Donovan may be a by-the-book kind of guy, but he cares and there are moments where he’s conflicted about doing what’s right and what people are telling him is right. Near the end of the film, he makes a decision based on a new predicament that occurs that is extremely dangerous, and could have had extreme consequences. However, at this point of the film we already know how he will react. It’s great to see, but looking back, you can easily see how dangerous that would have been.

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One of the things that also works extremely well is the relationship and chemistry between Hanks and Mark Rylance. It’s arguably the best working component of the film, and it disappears as Hanks and Rylance don’t share any screen time after the first act of the film. Thankfully, Hanks carries the film, but there is something about the relationship between Hanks and Rylance that makes the film tick and so engaging.

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Rylance is also a standout on his own. The beginning of the film actually follows Rylance’s Abel in a cold – no pun intended – opening as we follow him, and as agents follow him too, doing what seems like a morning routine until he gets a call to pick up something that we, as the audience, know is incriminating. But Rylance doesn’t need to say anything – in fact, he doesn’t say much in terms of dialogue – because he has such an amazing screen presences that it helps not only his character, but the tension going in for the rest of the film.

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However, despite amazing performances by Rylance and Hanks, the rest of the cast get only a few moments to shine, however not all of them work. Austin Stowell’s Gary Powers isn’t as intriguing as Abel, and after his introduction and getting shot down, he disappears with the exception of an integration scene. It’s kind of shame he’s not in the film more since he does play an important part for Hanks’ Donovan. Jesse Plemons also shows up as Powers’ friend and fellow pilot, but there isn’t really much for him to do. Amy Ryan pops in as Mary Donovan, who plays the part of concerned wife, but also somewhat understands why her husband does what he does.

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Dakin Matthews plays Judge Byers during the first half of the film and does a pretty good job and reminds us that during this time of history, even people that are supposed to up hold the law took a side. Scott Shepherd plays CIA agent Hoffman which goes to Berlin with Donovan, and tries to keep Donovan on track that the deal is to make them the trade. Sebastian Koch plays Vogel, a man that Donovan thinks could help him with everything in Berlin, but something to Donovan feels off.

Bridge of Spies does stumble a bit near the middle of the film. A new plot point is introduced that doesn’t really do too much for the film other than give Donovan another obstacle to overcome. There are also a few plot points that a bought up, but never mentioned or even hinted at again as the film progresses. Yes, the film is all about Donovan and his task, but it would have been nice for the film to give some sort of resolution or a mention.

The film, again, really tries to put you in the mindset of the people living in the time. There is even a point in the film where Donovan makes a funny remark about his treatment in a certain place. Speaking of funny, Bridge of Spies has some surprisingly great humor injected into the film that breaks some of the tension and seriousness of the situations.

All in all, Bridge of Spies has a lot going on, and while most of it works, the missteps make it from being an even greater film. Tom Hanks and Mark Rylance’s chemistry makes the film pop and is the arguably the better part of the film, but make no mistake in saying that this film belongs to Hanks.

Bridge of Spies

4 out of 5

October Movie Releases

It is October ladies and gentleman!

This month looks pretty great and, yet again, some early Oscar nominations could come out. Of course, let’s not forget that it is the month of Halloween, so there are some potentially great horror films out this month. But let’s stop talking about them and actually get to them!

Also, Happy Early Halloween!

 

2nd

*The Walk gets an early/limited IMAX release before its wide release next week. So check out next week for my thoughts*

*Sicario gets its final theater release this week*

 

The Martian

Ridley Scott adapts Andy Weir’s critically acclaimed and best-selling novel of the same name with an impressive and awesome cast. The film follows Mark Watney (Matt Damon) as an astronaut that is left behind and presumed dead on Mars during a man mission. Watney then has to use his skills to surive on the planet while his crew (Jessica Chastain, Kate Mara, Michael Pena, and Aksel Vogel) find out from NASA that he is still alive and decide to go get him back. The film looks great and, like I mentioned, the cast is great. Besides the aforementioned cast members, The Martian also stars Kristen Wiig, Sebastian Stan, Donald Glover, Mackenzie Davis, Sean Bean, Chiwetel Ejiofor and Jeff Daniels.

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9th

*Steve Jobs gets a limited release only in L.A and New York. It gets a wide release at the end of the month, so I’ll give my thoughts and info there.*

 

Limited Release: The Final Girls

Max (Taissa Farmiga) grieving the loss of her mother (Malin Akerman), a famous scream queen from the 1980s, finds herself and her friends pulled into the world of her mom’s most famous movie. Reunited, the women must fight off the film’s maniacal killer. The film was a hit as Fantastic Fest and based on the trailer, it does look like it can be a fun time. The film also stars Alexander Ludwig, Nina Dobrev, Alla Shawkat, Thomas Middleditch, Adam DeVine, Angela Trimbur, Chloe Bridges, Tory N. Thompson and Dan B. Norris.

 

Pan

Joe Wright (Hanna) brings the classic J.M. Barrie characters to life in a prequel format. The films follows a young orphaned Peter Pan (Levi Miller) who gets transported to the fantasy land of Neverland. There, he finds both fun and dangers, and finds out that he is part of a prophecy by the people there that he will lead them to freedom by the fearsome Blackbeard (Hugh Jackman). I’m not completely sold on Pan just yet, the trailers make the film look like it could be a lot of fun and Neverland looks, well, fantastical. Maybe it’s the prequel idea or that I wasn’t always the biggest Peter Pan fan, but I will probably end up watching it. Pan also stars Garrett Hedlund (Hook), Rooney Mara (Tiger Lilly), Amanda Seyfried (Mary), Nonso Anozie (Bishop), and  Adeel Akhtar (Mr. Smee).

 

The Walk

Robert Zemeckis tells the true story about French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s attempt to cross the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in 1974. The film looks great and Zemeckis apparently shot a lot of the film in IMAX and the stuff he filmed in it looks great (seeing the trailer in IMAX anyway). This one definitely is in a must-watch list. The Walk stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Charlotte Le Bon, Ben Schwartz, James Badge Dale and Ben Kingsley.

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16th

Limited Release: Room

Rising star actress Brie Larson stars in a modern-day story about the boundless love between mother and child; young Jack knows nothing of the world except for the single room in which he was born and raised. The film is an adaptation of the novel written by Emma Donoghue (who also wrote the film) and is inspired off the real life cases of Jaycee Lee Dugard and Elisabeth Fritzl, who were kidnapped and held captive and hidden in rooms for 18 years and had children. Directed by Lenny Abrahamson (who directed last year’s Frank) debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival recently to rave reviews, especially for Larson, who plays the mother and Jacob Tremblay, who portrays Jack. The film also stars Joan Allen and William H. Macy.

 

Goosebumps

R.L. Stine’s famous characters come to life in this film that follows Zach (Dylan Minnette), who teams up with Hannah (Odeya Rush) – who just so happens to be the daughter of famous author R.L. Stine (Jack Black) – to help her free their home town of Greendale, Maryland after Stine’s characters magically get set free. I’ve been split on this since it was first announced. I was for it when they said they were going to do, then Jack Black got cast as R.L. Stine and nothing against Black, he can be good when he wants to be and with the right material, but I didn’t buy it. Then the trailers came out, and it looks like it’s going to be a fun family movie or just least dumb fun, so I’m in again. Goosebumps also stars Ryan Lee, Halston Sage, Ella Wahlestedt, Jillian Bell, Kumail Nanjlani, Ken Marino and Amy Ryan.

 

Bridge of Spies

Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks reunite to tell a true story about an insurance salesman (Hanks), who is brought in by the government to help them negotiate the return of a soldier that shot down behind enemy lines during the Cold War for a spy that is in America. Written by the Coen Brothers, the film looks like a great drama-thriller that is suited for Spielberg and Hanks, and with these two fronting it, it should be good. Bridge of Spies also stars Alan Alda, Amy Ryan, Eve Hewson, Peter McRobbie, Austin Stowell, Sebastian Koch, and Mark Rylance.

 

Crimson Peak

Guillermo Del Toro goes back to his gothic horror roots with this film. That sees Edith Cushing (Mia Wasikowska), an aspiring author who is torn between love for her childhood friend and the temptation of a mysterious outsider. Trying to escape the ghosts of her past, she is swept away to a house that breathes, bleeds and remembers. The film looks creepy as hell and del Toro is a master of his craft and with a cast that also includes Tom Hiddleston, Jessica Chastain, Charlie Hunnam, Leslie Hope, Burn Gorman and Jim Beaver, this has been on my must-see list since it was announced.

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23rd

Burnt

Bradley Cooper stars as Adam Jones as a chef that ruined his career with drugs and his diva begavior that tries to clean up his act by going to London and starting a new restaurant so he can gain three Michelin stars. I’ve seen the trailer a few times now and I’m not completely sold on it yet. Maybe it’s because Jon Favreau’s Chef was so good that it has tarnished me watching another chef movie, okay not really, it’s just that the trailer hasn’t grabbed me yet, which doesn’t sit well with me because the cat is great. The cast includes Alicia Vikander, Lily James, Sienna Miller, Daniel Bruhl, Matthew Rhys, Uma Thurman, Sarah Greene, Omar Sy and Emma Thompson.

 

Rock the Kasbah

Bill Murray fronts this musical comedy about a down-on-his-luck music manager (Murray) who discovers a teenage girl with an extraordinary voice while on a music tour in Afghanistan and takes her to Kabul to compete on a popular TV show, Afghan Star. I’ve only seen the trailer once at a movie theater and it looked pretty funny. But, I think I’ll have to watch another trailer to really get me into the film. Yeah sure it’s Bill Murray, but, that can’t be enough to carry a movie – at least for me. The film also stars Zooey Deschanel, Bruce Willis, Kate Hudson, Scott Caan, and Danny McBride.

 

Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension

The last installment of the Paranormal Activity films brings everything full circle, or at least that is what producers are saying. The film follows the same format from what we’ve seen so far. A family finds old and weird tapes from Katie and Kristi’s childhood and eventually weird things start to happen around their home and around their young children. They then find a special camera that shows us, for the first time in the series, “The Ghost Dimension” where we can see things that human eyes can’t. Personally, I just hope that it doesn’t disappoint because the series has kind of gone downhill since the third outing.

 

Jem and the Holograms

A modern day adaptation of the popular 80s musical cartoon directed by Jon M. Chu (G.I. Joe: Retaliation)tells us the story of a small town girl (Aubrey Peeples) who goes from video sensation to global superstar known as Jem. She and her three sisters (Stefanie Scott, Hayley Kiyoko, and Aurora Perrineau) begin a journey to of self-discovery and family. A lot fans are up-in-arms about the adaptation because it doesn’t look like the Jem they knew growing up. Just basing it off the trailers, I’m not really looking forward to this. It could be that I’m not the demographic they are trying to reach, but something about the trailers doesn’t pull me in. The rest of the cast includes Molly Ringwald, Ryan Guzman, Nicholas Braun, Nathan Moore and Juliette Lewis.

 

The Last Witch Hunter

Vin Diesel stars as, well, the last witch hunter that was cursed with immortality and now in present-day New York he must team up with another witch (Rose Leslie) to take down a plot that plans on releasing a more powerful witch upon the world. The movie doesn’t look that bad really and I think we can all know what to expect, but the trailers do make the film look like it could be at least a cool time while watching. The film also stars Elijah Wood, Olafur Darri Olafsson, Julie Engelbrecht, Rena Owen and Michael Caine.

 

Steve Jobs

Danny Boyle-directed and Aaron Soarkin-written biopic about, well, Apple innovator and face of the company, Steve Jobs. Jobs is played by Michael Fassbender that will follow Jobs through three, 30-minute scenes spreading across sixteen years of the life of Steve Jobs. The scenes will dramatize backstage events before three major product launches and will employ some flashbacks depicting key moments of Jobs’ life. The film debuted at film festivals recently and has been heavily praised by many, and not surprisingly, has been said it could be nominated for Oscars when the time comes. The film looks great so let’s see what happens. The films also stars Kate Winslet, Seth Rogen, Sarah Snook, Katherine Waterston, Michael Stuhlbarg, John Ortiz, and Jeff Daniels.

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30th

Our Brand Is Crisis

A feature film based on the documentary of the same name, focuses on the use of American political campaign strategies in South America. The film is being labeled as a comedy-drama, and while I haven’t seen the trailer, I’ve seen bits of the documentary online and it gives me an idea on who they will go with this. The cast is rather impressive with Sandra Bullock leading the cast with Billy Bob Thornton, Anthony Mackie, Scott McNairy, Zoe Kazan and Joaquim de Almedia.

 

Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse

Originally titled Scouts vs. Zombies, the film sounds ridiculously yes, but after watching the trailer, it actually looks like a fun movie. The red-band trailer really doesn’t hold back and the movie doesn’t look like it’s going to hold back. I can’t believe I’m looking forward to this, but I am. The film stars Tye Sheridan, Logan Miller, Patrick Schwarzenegger, Sarah Dumont, Joey Morgan, Halston Sage, David Koechner, and Cloris Leachman.

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What are you looking forward to?