‘The Magnificent Seven’ Review

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Director: Antoine Fuqua

Writers: Nic Pizzolatto and Richard Wenk

Cast: Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt, Ethan Hawke, Vincent D’Onofrio, Byung-hun Lee, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo, Martin Sensmeier, Haley Bennet, Peter Sarsgaard, Luke Grimes, and Matt Bomer

Synopsis: Seven gun men in the old west gradually come together to help a poor village against savage thieves.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Based on the classic Western of the same name, that was based on the classic film by acclaimed director Akira Kurosawa Seven Samurai, Antoine Fuqua brings is take to The Magnificent Seven with his own star-studded cast and great visuals of his own. I’ll be honest, I’ve been looking forward to this – and yes, I’ve seen the originals – but of course I actually don’t mind remakes and knee-jerkingly reject them just at the thought of it. So, was my excitement worth it? Or does it have to take a long walk into the sunset with my head down? Let’s load up our horse and find out.

The Magnificent Seven starts off by showing just what kind of person the heroes would be going through. The town of Rose Creek are being taken over by a mining corporation run by Bartholomew Bouge (Sarsgaard) who wants the townspeople to sell him their land, but when he shoots the husband of Emma Cullen (Bennett) – played by Matt Boomer – she goes to find men to help her and townspeople take back their town. She eventually finds and recruits bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Washington), who in turn brings in gambler and playboy Josh Farraday (Pratt) to help him bring in the best people to give the town a shot. The two haul in famed sharpshooter Goodnight Robincheaux (Hawke) and his knife-wielding partner Billy Rocks (Lee), an outlaw named Vasquez (Garcia-Rulfo), tracker Jack Horne (D’Onofrio) and Comanche Native American named Red Harvest (Sensmeier). All seven of them get together to protect the town, even with odds stacked against them. What follows is a grand – or magnificent? – finale that will make any Western fan happy.

(l to r) Vincent D'Onofrio, Martin Sensmeier, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo, Ethan Hawke, Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt and Byung-hun Lee star in Columbia Pictures' THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN.

(l to r) Vincent D’Onofrio, Martin Sensmeier, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo, Ethan Hawke, Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt and Byung-hun Lee 

I know I watched the originals, but let’s focus on the Western here, but it was a while ago so I can’t remember too much of it. However, I do know Fuqua’s version is different in its own way, and makes sense for the story he’s trying to tell. I know many won’t, and don’t like the idea of a Magnificent Seven remake – even though it itself is a remake, but whatever – but the film is a lot of fun, and completely worthwhile for new fans or old fans.

The cast is what makes the remake really worthwhile. Washington has worked with Fuqua three times now, and continues to show the duo have a lot of fun together and are great together. Chris Pratt’s Faraday looks like he’s enjoying poking fun at his fellow cast members and being a bit of a playboy, but he does have a sense of pride and duty once everything goes down. Peter Sarsgaard’s Bogue doesn’t have enough screen time as he probably should, which is saying something considering the film is a bit over two hours. Haley Bennett’s Emma Cullen gets a lot of screen time at the beginning, but blends into the background as the film moves forward.

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Ethan Hawke’s Goodnight has an interesting arc, although it takes a while for it to really come up and it kind of just slides away. Vincent D’Onofrio’s Jack Horne is a tracker that gets compared to a bear a lot, Byung-hun Lee’s Billy Rocks is the calm and collective one, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo’s Vasquez has a nice little rivalry with Faraday, and Martin Sensmeier’s Red Harvest has his moments.

Some, and even I’ll agree with some of it, will say the group gets together is too fast and there isn’t enough conflict between them. Especially since we hear that Jack Horne has killed a lot of Native Americans, and while their interactions with Red Harvest are minimal they never come off as standoffish but slight jabbing. It’s nice dynamic – all the characters have them – but it’s something that I know people will bring up. There are some other things that are never fully developed, but for the most part the film doesn’t suffer that much from it.

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The action is top notch and the final shootout is a sight to see. There is a lot going on in the scene, but you always know where you are and can follow the action throughout. It’s also pretty satisfying considering the film builds up to it for half the film. It also helps that the final shootout is great since right before the ending the film loses some steam and slows down.

All in all, The Magnificent Seven is a great, fun ride of a film. The cast is great and the final shootout is a great time. While the film may not be perfect in terms of some pacing issues and not going fleshing out some details, it is a worthwhile remake to a remake of a remake.

The Magnificent Seven

4 out of 5

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‘Red 2’ Review

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Dir: Dean Parisot (Galaxy Quest)

Cast: Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Mary-Louise Parker, Helen Mirren, Neal McDonough, Byung-hun Lee, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Anthony Hopkins

Synopsis: Retired C.I.A. agent Frank Moses reunites his unlikely team of elite operatives for a global quest to track down a missing portable nuclear device.

 

*Review Note: This is a non-spoiler review as always.*

 

After the success of RED back in 2010, the graphic novel adaptation has come back with a sequel that finds retired black ops agent Frank Moses (Willis) reuniting with his old partner Marvin Boggs (Malkovich) after a threat from their past resurfaces in the form of a Cold War-era nuclear weapon “Nightshade.” Now everyone thinks Frank and Marvin know where this device is located and it takes them on the run to not only clear their names but also save the world.

MI6 hires Frank and Marvin’s former sharpshooter friend Victoria (Mirren) to kill them. Also on their tail is U.S. official Horton (McDonough) and even he sends master assassin Han (Lee) after them. Han, as it turns out, has some unfinished business of his own with Frank.

Frank, Marvin, and Frank’s girlfriend Sarah (Parker), make their way around the globe to places like London, Paris and even Moscow to locate Nightshade. Along the way, they encounter Katja (Zeta-Jones), Frank’s former lover, and scientific genius Edward Bailey (Hopkins) who might be the key to helping them stop Nightshade.

The first movie did a great job of balancing humor and action, but it could have also been the chemistry between all the actors. This movie has the same balancing but it doesn’t have the same charm from part one which is probably one of the only letdowns (if that’s the word you want to use). However that doesn’t mean the humor isn’t funny. Malkovich and Mirren have their fair share of funny moments. Parker’s ever-wanting adventure character Sarah has more to do this time around. She sees the side of Willis’ Frank that she didn’t really see in part one and is dealing with Frank’s overprotective nature.

For the new additions; Zeta-Jones looks like she had fun with the role with an almost femme fatale-like vibe. Hopkins seemed like he was just phoning it in and doesn’t even show up until the third act. McDonough is passable as his character considering he’s use to playing that type of persona. The stand out is Byung Hun Lee, who despite coming in and out of the movie once he’s introduced is one of the coolest characters. His fights are great and he has this charisma/confidence in his non-fight scenes.

The action sequences, while just a bit generic they, are still pretty fun to watch. But one of the things I know will get to people is the bloodless kills. A majority, and by that I mean 98% of the kills, have no blood which I’m okay with. I don’t need blood in violence to justify it viewable.

All in all, Red 2 is just about as fun as part one and will have moments that people will like after they leave the theater.
Red 2

3.5 out of 5