My Best/Favorite Movies of Summer 2014

Can you believe it? Another Summer Movie Season (May to August) has come and gone, and it gave us a wide array of movies for us movie fans to choose from. It could be arguably said that this summer was not the best year of movies, it doesn’t mean that there were not good movies to see.

 

Of course that’s why I’m here. Like every summer, I’ve compiled a list of my favorite/best summer movies I’ve seen. I’ll be doing them in alphabetical order, since I think it’s more fair/better that way for me.

 

Let’s start off with some Honorable Mentions.

 

Honorable Mentions

A Most Wanted Man

Deliver Us From Evil

Edge of Tomorrow

Neighbors

The Expendables 3

The November Man

The Purge: Anarchy

The Rover

 

 

BEST/FAVORITE

Begin Again: It didn’t get a wide release like many of the summer movies on the list, but it was a great charming film that had a lot of heart, soundtrack, cast and performances.

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Boyhood: Whether you liked the movie or not, the concept around Boyhood is great. Richard Linklater was able to film a character’s (and actors) life through film and give us maybe one of the best coming of age stories.

 

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Chef: Another limited release and just like Begin Again it had a great cast, performances, heart, and soundtrack.

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Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Dawn had a lot riding against it. Rise of the Planet of the Apes was a great film but Dawn of the Planet of the Apes was a great sequel and arguably a better film.

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Godzilla: A lot of people complained that despite the title Godzilla doesn’t actually show up a lot in the film. Nonetheless, I thought the film was great. Gareth Edwards did a terrific job of building this world that I can’t wait to jump back into.

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Guardians of the Galaxy: Arguably one of the best Marvel movies to date (right there with Captain America: The Winter Soldier). With a great soundtrack, beautiful visuals and a top notch cast, Guardians is one of the best films of the summer.

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Snowpeircer: Let again another limited release but this one had been on my radar for a while as opposed to Begin Again or Chef. Directed by one of my favorite Korean directors Joon-ho Bong (who also did The Host) makes his American film debut, the movie had a real sense of dread and strokes of hope that kept me interested until the end.

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X-Men: Days of Future Past: Whether you liked it or not, Bryan Singer bought one of the most ambitious comic book storylines to the big screen, and combined his own cast and the new cast of the X-Men films.

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So, what are your favorite or best movies of the summer? Let me know in the comments.

‘Deliver Us from Evil’ Review

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Dir: Scott Derrickson

Cast: Eric Bana, Edgar Ramirez, Olivia Munn, Chris Coy, Sean Harris, Olivia Horton and Joel McHale

Synopsis: NY police officer Ralph Sarchie investigates a series of crimes. He joins forces with an unconventional priest, schooled in the rituals of exorcism, to combat the possessions that are terrorizing their city.

 

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

 

Based on retired NYPD detective Ralph Sarchie’s memoir “Beware the Night,“ (I have not read the book so I don’t know how faithful it is) Deliver Us From Evil follows Bronx cop Sarchie (Bana) as he investigates a series of grisly and eerie crimes that end up being connected by the supernatural. He eventually crosses paths with a Jesuit priest and exorcist Mendoza (Ramirez). Mendoza tells him that there is two types of evil, and the evil he’s dealing with is one that he should not underestimate. Sarchie however doesn’t believe Mendoza because, of course, everything can be explained. Sarchie also has a hard time believing in religion because he never got anything from it. This leads the two of them to down a dangerous path against a demon.

 

Scott Derrickson (The Exorcism of Emily Rose, Sinister), who has quickly become one of my favorite directors (and will direct Marvel’s Doctor Strange), gives the movie a nice mix of police procedural and supernatural thriller. The police material is great and for the first half of the movie, it’s all cop stuff with some supernatural aspects with the second half following more of the supernatural with some cop stuff. The good thing is that Derrickson does not give too much of the supernatural elements. He teases us throughout the movie but not enough to annoy but enough to keep us interested. That’s one of the things Derrickson does so well in his movies. It’s the slow builds that make the third acts in his movie worthwhile. Like his other films Derrickson manages to evoke gritty imagery and makes New York, more partially, the Bronx a character in itself.

 

The supernatural stuff is more or less of the same we’ve seen in other movies. It’s creepy, disturbing, eerie and sometimes gut-wrenching. But Derrickson already has a knack for directing the genre that it still creeps you out when it unfolds. The demon’s plot, might seem a little “meh” for people but once we find out what’s going on we are already invested in Sarchie’s character and everything else that it (at least to me) didn’t matter.

 

There are some things that might take some people out of it. Obviously for the sake of no spoilers I won’t write them, but considering this is a supernatural/demon/exorcism movie, it hopefully won’t throw people off that much.

 

As for the cast, mostly everyone does a pretty good job. One of the missteps is Olivia Munn’s wife character. It’s nothing against her and her acting but more dealing with her character being underwritten and really having nothing to do expect for two scenes. Surprisingly, and nothing against him because I do like him, Joel McHale gives a nice turn as a badass and Sarchie’s wise-cracking partner who has a thing for knifes.

 

Eric Bana is reliable as ever and plays Sarchie as the audience’s skeptical surrogate. And props to him, and the rest of the cast, for putting on strong New York accents but Bana gets the most props since he’s not even American. Next to Bana, the movie’s other highlight is Edgar Ramirez. Most exorcists in movies tend to be old men whose faith is either tested or being lost but Ramirez’s Mendoza is much more complicated than that. His past isn’t a bright one but it’s that past that makes him keep his life together. He drinks, smokes, checks out girls, and wears a leather jacket, but that doesn’t stop him from knowing what has to be done.

 

A special mention also has to be given to Sean Harris as the man possessed making Sarchie and Mendoza’s life hell (no pun intended). The character could have been laughable or just a character that stands in the shadows. It’s Harris’ intense performance alongside Bana and Ramirez’s that make the demon-battling scenes a little more give. The same is to be said about Olivia Horton’s Jane, which we’ve seen in the promotional material.

 

All in all, Deliver Us from Evil might be a little dull than the other exorcism movies but Derrickson manages to keep us invested with his powerful imagery. Add Bana, Ramirez, and Harris’ performances and it makes the movie a little stronger and much more than an exorcism movie.

 

 

Deliver Us from Evil

4.5 out of 5