My Worst, Disappointing, Least-Like Movies of the Year

It’s the end of the year boys and girls, you know what that means? It’s list time!

I’ll put up my list of “Best/Favorite” movies of the year later, but with all those best and favorite movies I have, I had to sit through some stinkers. Some of these I knew weren’t going to be any good walking in, but I ended up taking the hit anyway. The list ranges all over the place, so don’t think I’m attacking certain movies because it’s easy. I walk into every movie with a clear mind and soaking up the movie for what it’s worth. Good or bad.

The list will have the movies in alphabetical order, just to be fair, and because I really don’t want to go through the trouble anymore of picking a number one because they weren’t good enough to make it on my other list. Like all lists, this is my opinion! So if you don’t agree that’s perfectly fine, and probably justified. Finally, there are other movies that could have gone on the list, but these are the ones that truly stuck out. Alright, let’s get this over with.

 

Dishonorable Mentions

Blackhat (Universal Pictures/Legendary Pictures/Forward Pass)

Hitman: Agent 47 (20th Century Fox/TSG Entertainment/Infinite Frameworks Studios/Fox International Productions)

Hot Tube Time Machine 2 (Paramount Pictures/MGM)

Taken 3 (20th Century Fox/EuropaCorp/Canal+/TSG Entertainment/M6 Films/Cine+)

The Transporter Refueled (EuropaCorp/Fundamental Films/TF1 Films Productions/Belga Films/Canal+)

 

 

Disappointments/Least-Liked/Worst Movies of the Year

Aloha (Sony Pictures/Fox/Columbia Pictures/Vinyl Films)

Cameron Crowe’s latest film was hit with criticism with “white-washing” and keeping the film from critics to review just a couple days before release (not the only film on this list that did that). However, watching the film you can see why they kept it away from critics. Aloha had a great cast of Bradley Cooper, Emma Stone, Rachel McAdams, John Krasinski, and Bill Murray. Sadly, they couldn’t save this. The film tries to have high stakes, but only when it wants to, and it even felt ridiculous at times. Overall, the film was very uneven that at times made the film boring.

aloha

Fantastic Four (Fox/Marvel Entertainment/Marv Films/TSG Entertainment)

This one definitely goes into the disappointing and worst section. 20th Century Fox can’t nail down “Marvel’s First Family,” and it is strike three for them. Of course, it didn’t help that there was so much behind-the-scenes drama between the studio and director Josh Trank, and the troubling reshoots and scenes in the trailer that are nowhere in the film. Despite all that, like I said in my review: The fans lose in this, not Fox or Trank, us because we want to see a good Fantastic Four movie and what we got crap. Started out good, but crap nonetheless.

fantastic-four-poster

Jupiter Ascending (Warner Bros./Village Roadshow Pictures/Dune Entertainment)

I really wanted to like this movie more than I did. There are some great scenes in there, but the film felt way too big for its own good. The Wachowskis seemed like they were doing a lot of world building, but it all felt too condense and rushed with nothing having time to breathe. Dare I say, it probably would have worked better as a mini-series instead of a movie, but that’s just my opinion. The first sign was indeed the release date switch, when they pushed back the release date by a year.

jupiter_ascending_ver3

Maggie (Liongates/Roadside Attractions/Grindstone Entertainment Group/Gold Star Films/Lotus Entertainment/Silver Reel/Gold Star Films/Matt Baer Films)

I wasn’t expecting too much of Maggie, but I walked in open-minded (as always) to watch a different take of the zombie genre. Arnold Schwarzenegger as a father dealing with his daughter, played by Abigail Breslin, being infected with virus that is turning people into zombies was interesting to see. However, Maggie’s slow burn didn’t really do the film any favors as the film felt too slow at times and when something powerful happened it took me a while to actually register it because I had to catch up at times. One thing that made me put the film on the list was the ending. The ending looked like it was going to go down a very powerful route, but instead went out in a whimper, and didn’t take the risk that that film could have really made and where they were potentially hinting at. I will say that Arnold as a father figure was great to see.

maggie

Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension (Paramount Pictures/Blumhouse Productions)

I was a fan and defender of the Paranormal Activity films up until the third installment, and I enjoyed most of the spinoff The Marked Ones, but the series showed signs of losing it during the fourth installment. It seemed like the series just didn’t care anymore, and while it tried to add new things to the series, it just never kicked off the way they probably thought it would. As for The Ghost Dimension, the last of the series, it just didn’t do it for me. The supposed answers we were promised were rushed and lackluster, and the ending was just weak and not a good end to the series at all. The movie felt like just another installment that was setting up the real final installment. Another case of a good series losing it momentum by the end, and overstaying its welcome.

paranormal_activity_the_ghost_dimension

Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (Sony Pictures/Columbia Pictures/Happy Madison Productions)

I didn’t walk in really expecting much from this. I’ll admit, I enjoyed the first Paul Blart: Mall Cop. It had its funny and goofy moments, but it knew what it was and didn’t take itself too seriously. Unfortunately, the sequel did take itself a little bit too seriously for its own good. The jokes fell flat the majority of the time, and to be honest it just wasn’t that good. All the charm and goofiness the first film had was stripped away and replaced with unnecessary fat jokes and lame/awful jokes.

paul_blart_mall_cop_two

Point Break (Warner Bros./Alcon Entertainment/DMG Entertainment/Studio Babelsberg)

Despite my slight optimism for remakes in general, Point Break was a shallow and pointless remake that didn’t do much for me – and probably anyone – and while it had it’s very short and brief moments and a great performance with Edgar Ramirez, Point Break failed on all spectrum’s.

point_break

Seventh Son (Universal Pictures/Legendary Pictures)

Seventh Son felt a bit messy. The movie isn’t horrible, but the movie sometimes feels like you’re already familiar with some aspects of the world and it’s a little off-putting at times. One scene in particular threw me off only because they made the scene feel like it was really important, but emotionally it didn’t come out that way because there was no real investment in character involved.

seventh_son_ver10

Terminator Genisys (Paramount Pictures/Skydance Productions)

Terminator Genisys had some potential, Arnold Schwarzenegger came back, after some fans wanted him back, Alan Taylor was directing, and the film was going to add some new things to the timeline that we all know. Then that second trailer came out. You know, the one that gave away what could have been the biggest twist in the series and potentially a great moment to watch onscreen for the first time. Yeah, that one. Knowing that going in really hurt the movie, and despite their being another layer to the twist, it still wasn’t enough to forgive them for spoiling that big plot point in the trailers, TV spots, and posters.

terminator_genisys_ver6

The Gallows (Warner Bros./New Line Cinema/Blumhouse Productions/Management 360/Tremendum Pictures)

Another addition to the Found Footage horror subgenre was The Gallows, and like some of the films before it: it wasn’t good. Despite some cool and eerie shots in the movie, one of the characters – mainly holding the camera – was annoying to the point that it took me out of the movie. I can handle annoying characters, but holy hell did he reach a whole new level. Moreover, the motivation and reveal of why the events happen ended up making no sense whatsoever and seemed like a last minute thing. The Gallows may be the worst Found Footage movie I’ve seen.

gallows

The Green Inferno (BH Tilt/High Top Releasing/Worldview Entertainment/Dragonfly Entertainment/Sobras International Pictures)

I’m not the biggest Eli Roth fan, but I’ve slightly enjoyed some of his movies in the past, but The Green Inferno was rough to watch, and not in the way it was supposed to be rough to watch. None of the characters were really all that likeable, with the expectation of maybe two, and even the slow burn and waiting for everything to go to hell isn’t worth the wait. Some of the gore is good – that’s what the film is really about anyway – but overall this wasn’t good at all. This is definitely one of the worst films of the year.

green_inferno_ver2

The Lazarus Effect (Lionsgate/Blumhouse Productions/Relativity Studios)

This one had a ton of potential and even had the cast lead by Olivia Wilde and Mark Duplass to back it up. Unfortunately, the potential of the film disappeared once the film became a supernatural slasher-esque film in the last act. The Lazarus Effect had a great premise behind it, but the execution of it lacked power and left the film underwhelming to watch.

lazarus_effect

Tomorrowland (Walt Disney Pictures/A113)

This one hurt. I was actually conflicted to put Tomorrowland on this list and not put it as an “Honorable Mention” on my “Favorite/Best” movies of the year. However, that wouldn’t be extremely fair to the other movies. Tomorrowland had ton of potential, had a great team behind the camera and in front of the camera, but ultimately it was the lack of execution and beating over the head theme (which I loved, but sill) that made this probably one of the biggest disappointments, if not the biggest, of the year.

tomorrowland-poster-imax

So, what were your biggest disappointments, worst, or least-liked films of the year?

‘Fantastic Four’ Review

fantastic_four_ver9

Dir: Josh Trank

Writer(s): Josh Trank, Jeremy Slater, and Simon Kinberg

Cast: Miles Teller, Michael B. Jordan, Kate Mara, Jamie Bell, Toby Kebbell, Tim Blake Nelson and Reg E. Cathey.

Synopsis: Four young outsiders teleport to an alternate and dangerous universe which alters their physical form in shocking ways. The four must learn to harness their new abilities and work together to save Earth from a former friend turned enemy.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

The Fantastic Four aka “Marvel’s First Family” is very beloved by many fans. However, 20th Century Fox has never really been able to nail down the characters. Tim Story’s 2005 film, and its sequel in 2007 were not received well and came off as too goofy and campy. Enter the age of gritty and darker comic book movies and Josh Trank brings his take – sort of – to the Fantastic Four with a movie more connected to science instead of science-fiction, with elements of experiments gone wrong and familiar characters. However, it’s all the behind-the-scenes drama that most people will probably remember from his reboot.

 

I don’t want to focus on the behind-the-scenes drama because if you walk in to the movie with all that in your head, as much as you want to enjoy the movie for what it is – which you should always do that – it will get to you. However, Trank isn’t completely to blame, at least according to some well place and reliable people. That being said, this review will ONLY focus on the movie and not things that unfortunately happened. I will just say this, Trank and Fox may take the hits, but at the end of day, it’s the fans that lose.

 

The movie starts off by showing us a young Reed Richards (Owen Judge) building a machine that he believes at the time to only be a teleporter. With the help from a young Ben Grimm (Evan Hannermann), the two pull it off. Up ahead seven years, an older Reed (Teller) and Ben (Bell) try to show off their invention at a science fair only to be disqualified because they think it’s a magic trick. However, Reed and Ben meet Dr. Franklin Storm (Cathey) and his adopted daughter Sue (Mara), who sees Reed’s invention as the last piece of their own project they’ve been doing. Reed gets to go work at the Baxter Institute where he continues his work.

 

27C0F38E00000578-3046192-Here_comes_trouble_Michael_B_Jordan_s_Johnny_Storm_second_from_l-a-17_1429482086690

 

Franklin Storm eventually brings in a resentful former worker and co-founder of the project they bought Reed into do, Victor Von Doom (Kebbell) and Johnny (Jordan) to help finish transporting to another dimension. Seeing that the machine works, and it is possible to travel safely to the alternate dimension, the project takes a bump that they didn’t see coming. So Reed calls Ben so the two, along with Victor and Johnny, can go and see their work for themselves. However, disaster hits as the four try to return and as they try to head back the four – along with Sue by accident – becoming affected with abilities they don’t know and can’t explain.

 

For all intent-and-purposes, Fantastic Four is an origin story. The characters are new version from what you’ve seen before. In fact, the movie tries to play them as teenagers. Yes, teenagers: Miles Teller, who is 28, and Jamie Bell, who is 29, are treated as that and when we see the “adult” versions of them, they are in a science fair in school. Sue is apparently the same age or maybe older, and Johnny is able to drive – the first time we see him he’s street racing – and tells his father during an encounter later in the movie that he’s in adult. Victor is the most notable adult of the five. The age issue is probably a small thing, and not the worse part of this movie, but it is odd once you think about it.

 

The nice thing about the film is, for the most part, you know who these characters are. Reed wants his work to mean something and do good for everyone, he’s not doing it for the fame. Sue wants the same thing, but goes about it for own way. Johnny wants to be his own man and doesn’t want to really follow in his father’s footsteps although he could. Victor is driven by ambition and doesn’t want his work to be messed with by anyone, especially the government.

 

MV5BMTk0MTM0MzgxNV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNzIwMjUyNTE@._V1__SX1206_SY582_

 

The least developed character at the start is Ben Grimm. The only thing we get from his character is that he comes from a poor income family and gets beaten up by his older brother. Once he gets turned into The Thing he becomes angry, but, he uses his anger. It’s hard to talk about it because I don’t want to get into spoilers, but there is a single shot that connects to what he’s been up to since turning The Thing, that I thought would be a great place to go and have that be a new character trait or something that can change the character that we’ve known for ages. But, no, instead it gets tossed aside and it never mentioned again.

 

I’ll say this, the first two-thirds of the movie work, even with the middle of the movie being a bit sluggish and unbalanced. Fantastic Four is a filled with action. Instead it brings the focus to the characters and dealing with their newfound abilities. Instead of automatically embracing it, they are actually scarred, especially Ben, who of course gets the worse of it. The film jumps a year after they get their powers and sees them be able to use them. It did irk me that we couldn’t see the actual scenes of them learning how to use their powers because it would have given us an extra layer to attach to, but as is some of the rest of the movie, a missed opportunity.

 

Fantastic-Four-2015-Reboot-Early-Reviews

 

Now, that’s the first two-thirds, and again, it isn’t that bad as many are saying it is. It’s not perfect. However, the final act of the movie is what really hurts Fantastic Four, so much so that no matter how hard I tried to not think of the behind-the-scenes problems, I thought of them, and you can clearly see some of the problems. Moreover, the final act is way too rushed and kills any sort of potential and monument the movie had. It’s almost a shame to say, because you obviously you want a movie to end strong, but Fantastic Four’s ending feels like they were doing too much in little time.

 

The cast does okay with what they are given. Miles Teller is pretty reserved here and doesn’t step foot into the typical leadership role until the very end. Kate Mara’s Sue Storm has her very brief moments to shine, but gets a little stronger as the movie goes on. Jaime Bell, again, is one of the most underdeveloped characters as human Ben Grimm and even The Thing. There was some great potential for his character, but they don’t do anything with it. Also, the CGI-d Thing isn’t too bad. It’s probably the best effect the movie has, which is saying something because some of the CGI is a bit wonky in areas.

 

Human-Torch-in-Fantastic-Four-Trailer-2

 

Michael B. Jordan is okay as Johnny Storm aka The Human Torch. He a certain attitude to him that makes sense when you look at everything that he goes through. Of course, everyone was up in arms when he was cast as Johnny and the question of race came up – along with some disturbing and disgusting comments – but no one batted in eye when Reg E. Cathey was cast as Franklin Storm. Anyway, the stupid argument of race doesn’t even matter at the end since Sue is the one that’s actually adopted. The adoption is bought up about twice, never to full effect, but it almost doesn’t matter. Which brings me to my next point.

 

The four never really feel like a full fledge team. Instead when they face Doom at the end, it feels like they are just teaming up because Doom is trying to kill everyone on Earth. Even when the movie tries to make it seem like they’ve always been together as a group, it feels forced. Yes, the argument could be made that it is an origin story and this is how they become the team or they haven’t earned the team at this point, but considering Sue and Johnny are supposed to be siblings, and Ben and Reed are suppose to be best childhood friends – although they only have a few scenes together and some don’t even work – the group doesn’t blend well together.

 

the_fantastic_four-still_2

 

As for Toby Kebbell’s Victor Von Doom aka Dr. Doom, or just Doom, well, let’s just say that it isn’t all that great. Kebbell is a great actor and is finally getting some recognition for that, but wow, did Fox mess this up. I’m even going to say that Victor is a better character than Doom, and Doom has superpowers! Maybe it was because there isn’t enough Doom in the movie, and even his short screentime isn’t the best. I think if his look was different, than the scenes of him using his powers could have been more terrifying. I’m indifferent about the look, only because of the way they went about making the look. Unfortunately, even Kebbell couldn’t save the character.

 

Reg E. Cathey is highly misused here and no thanks to some weird editing – most likely by Fox when the kicked Trank out of the editing process – is robbed of what could have been a great scene with Jordan before the final act. Tim Blake Nelson plays a greedy government official that chews up any scene he’s in, but the role is wasted on Nelson, who is a great actor, because it really adds nothing, other than have a human antagonist opposite Doom.

 

All in all, Fantastic Four is not as bad as people and critics are saying. The movie isn’t fantastic (sorry, I had to), but it isn’t terrible either. The final act of the movie does hurt the film a lot because of how rushed it feels and the terrible structure of it. The behind-the-scenes drama coming out does hurt the film a bit, but only because it is extremely noticeable in a lot of places. Also, there are quite a few shots in the trailer that seemed really cool that aren’t even in the movie! So be ready for that. Yes, Fox and Josh Trank will take the hit, but it is us the fans that suffer from all the drama. So is Fantastic Four worth watching? In most cases it is, and then the ending comes around, and then it isn’t.

 

Fantastic Four

2.5 out of 5

Screen Shot 2015-06-30 at 9.13.26 PM

August Movie Releases

Can you believe it’s already August? Seriously, where has the all the time gone geez. Anyway, August is filled some films that could have potential. It’s also the last month of the Summer Movie Season, also known to some as studios’ “dump month”  or just dumping movies they don’t have complete faith in. Let’s hope that it is not the true case.

 

 

7th

Limited Releases: Dark Places & The Diary of a Teenager Girl

 

Ricki and the Flash

Everyone’s favorite Meryl Streep goes a little against type playing a rock-and-roll musician who left home and her family to follow her dreams, but returns home when her daughter’s, played by Mamie Gummer, husband leaves her. I like Meryl Streep as much as the next person, but I feel like I’ve watched the whole movie on the trailer. So maybe avoid the full trailer if you want to watch it. The film also stars Sebastian Stan, Rick Springfield, Audra McDonald, and Kevin Kline.

 

Shaun the Sheep Movie

A stop-motion movie based on TV show of the same name which follows titular character Shaun trying to get some of his friends back to the farm. The adventure leads to Shaun and some of his other sheep friends to the “Big City.” I’ve actually heard of the show in passing but never watched it for myself, but I like stop-motion work so I might give this a shot.

 

The Gift

Jason Bateman, Joel Edgerton and Rebecca Hall star in this mystery thriller as a married couple’s (Bateman and Hall) lives get thrown into a tailspin after an old acquaintance (Edgerton) from the husband’s past brings gifts and starts to act mysteriously around the couple. This one kind of popped out of nowhere for me. The cast is great and I’m interested to see what exactly the mystery is and hoping it’s not too cliché.

 

Fantastic Four

Fox is giving another go at the most popular family in comic book history. The movie is directed by Josh Trank (Chronicle) and is taking the grittier approach from the first look at the trailers. The movie is taking a lot of crap because of the tonal shift, the weird casting, changing Dr. Doom’s name and origin, and the race changing of Johnny Storm/The Human Torch being played by Michael B. Jordan (although I don’t remember anyone giving any flake to Reg E. Cathey for playing Franklin Storm, the father of Johnny and Sue Storm (Kate Mara)). Nonetheless, the movie could end up surprising us, so let’s see what they bring to the table. The film also stars Miler Teller, Jamie Bell, and Toby Kebbell.

shaun_the_sheep_ver7 ricki_and_the_flash gift fantastic-four-poster

 

 

14th

Underdogs

An animated film that is pretty self-explanatory. The film follows Amadeo, a local top Foosball player, as his town is about to be taken over by an old rival. Amadeo challenges his rival to a game of real soccer; the catch is that Amadeo has help from the players in his Foosball table that have come to life. The movie looks okay, I’m not really excited for it too much, but I’m sure it’ll find an audience.  Rupert Grint, Ariana Grande, Nicholas Hoult, Anthony Head, John Leguizamo, and Belle Throne voice the cast.

 

Straight Outta Compton

The biopic about one of the most popular and outspoken groups in music history: N.W.A. The film has been in the works for a few years now, but it wasn’t until recently that it started to pick up steam, and now, we’re finally getting it. The movie is being produced by members Dr. Dre and Ice Cube, so we can expect something close to and maybe some sort of inside look to the group life we didn’t know. The movie also feels a little more personal since Ice Cube’s son is being played by his actual son. The rest of the cast is filled out by only a few familiar faces like Paul Giamatti playing the group’s manager, Jerry Heller, but is filled with most newcomers to the scene like Corey Hawkins (Dr. Dre), Jason Mitchell (Eazy-E), Neil Brown Jr. (Dj Yella), Aldis Hodge (MC Ren), R. Marcos Taylor (Suge Knight) and Alexandra Shipp (Kim).

 

The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

Superman and The Lone Ranger partner up, well at least the actors. The film is based on the show of the same name that ran from the mid 60s about a CIA agent (Henry Cavill) and a KGB operative (Armie Hammer) have to work together to stop an organization from setting off a nuclear weapon. The film is directed by Guy Ritchie and the film does have his style all over it, so let’s hope that The Man from U.N.C.L.E. is good enough especially with the rest of the cast of Alicia Vikander, Elizabeth Debicki, Jared Harris and Hugh Grant.

metegol_ver23 man_from_uncle_ver4 straight_outta_compton_ver8

 

 

21st

American Ultra

Max Landis wrote this film that stars Jesse Eisenberg as a stoner store clerk that actually happens to be a sleeper government agent, but his programming is phased because of all the drugs. Trouble brews when he becomes a target and the government also captures his girlfriend (Kristen Stewart). I’m going to watch the movie, but I’m actually a little tired of seeing Eisenberg playing a stoner-like character. The rest of the cast fills out to Topher grace, Walton Goggins, Connie Britton, John Leguizamo, Tony Hale, and Bill Pullman.

 

Hitman: Agent 47

Fox has decided to reboot their video game adaptation of Hitman. This time the film is called Hitman: Agent 47 which sees the titled agent (played by Rupert Friend) teaming up with a woman to help her find her father, who may have had a hand on creating the program that made him an assassin. I had no problem with the last film – it had its moments – but I will say this reboot looks pretty action-heavy. Friend is from the Showtime show Homeland, which he’s pretty good in and I think he’s going to nail to nail this role. The rest of the cast is Hannah Ware, playing the woman mentioned earlier, Thomas Kretschmann, Emilio Rivera, Ciaran Hinds, and Zachary Quinto.

american_ultra_ver5 hitman_agent_forty_seven_ver2

 

 

28th

Limited Release: Z for Zachariah

The film opened at the Toronto Film Festival to rave reviews and with three strong leads – and possibly the only cast members – I can see why. The film follows three survivors (Margot Robbie, Chiwetel Ejifor and Chris Pine) who are bought together after a disaster wipes out civilization. The film isn’t going to be like most post-apocalyptic films, as the movie looks to be a straightforward drama with some thriller aspects thrown in.  Can’t wait to see it.

 

We Are Your Friends

Zac Efron plays an aspiring DJ who looks to make it in the electronic music (EMD) scene. The trailer doesn’t do too much for me to be honest. It’s not even that I’m not a huge fan of EMD, but the trailer doesn’t make the movie seem that appealing. The rest of the cast is filled out by Emily Ratajokwski, Jon Bernthal, Jonny Weston, Shiloh Fernandez, and Wes Bentley.

 

Sinister 2

The horror sequel will see the urban legend Bughuul return to haunt a new family of a single mother (Shannyn Sossamon) and her two sons. The movie is said to have Bughuul involved more – possibly even more about his history, along with the spirits of his past children victims. The only help they have will be from the returning character of Deputy So & So (James Ransone). I don’t know how I feel about the movie after watching the first trailer. Not because it didn’t look any good, but because it looks like it gave just a tad bit too much away. Although, the last film looked like it gave a tad bit much in the trailers, but it didn’t.

 

Regression

Emma Watson and Ethan Hawke star in this suspense thriller that finds a detective (Hawke) trying to solve a mysterious case that involves a girl (Watson), her family and a possible cult. I didn’t know too much about the movie, but once the trailer came out I was fully on board. The trailer is creepy and it looks like the film will keep us guessing until the very end.

we_are_your_friends_ver2 sinister_two_ver2 regression_ver2

 

So, what are you looking forward to?