Disappointments/Least-Liked/Worst Movies of 2018

It’s the end of the year boys and girls, you know what that means? It’s list time!

I’ll put up my list of “Best/Favorite” movies of the year later, but with all those good/great/awesome movies I have seen, I had to sit through some stinkers unfortunately. Some of these I knew weren’t going to be any good walking in, but I ended up taking the hit anyway. The list ranges all over the place, so don’t think I’m attacking certain movies because it’s easy. I walk into every movie with a clear mind and soaking up the movie for what it’s worth.

The list will have the movies in alphabetical order, just to be fair, and because I really don’t want to go through the trouble anymore of picking a number one because they weren’t good enough to make it on my other list.

Like all lists, this is my opinion! So if you don’t agree that’s perfectly fine and probably justified. Film is subjective, and that’s why I love it. Finally, there are other movies that could have gone on the list, but these are the ones that truly stuck out.

But first, let’s talk about the movies I didn’t know where to put, or as I like to call it – The Undecided

 

The Undecided Movies of the Year

Assassination Nation

Hotel Artemis

Mandy

Solo: A Star Wars Story

Suspiria

The Strangers: Prey at Night

Tully

Unsane

Venom

 

 

Alright, now let’s get this over with.

Dishonorable Mentions

Breaking In

Hell Fest

The 15:17 to Paris

 

 

Disappointments/Least-Liked/Worst Movies of the Year

Death Wish

A remake of the cult classic series that starred Charles Bronson, the remake was directed by Eli Roth and starred Bruce Willis as Paul Kersey, a doctor who becomes a vigilante after his wife gets murdered, and daughter gets attacked, during a home invasion. The problem with Death Wish, well one of them, is it felt a little tone deaf in terms of the message it’s trying to get across at times. Especially considering the movie’s overall message being controversial itself, but it doesn’t help that the movie sometimes has major tonal issues when it comes to cops in the movie, more specifically Dean Norris’ character.

 

Proud Mary

Proud Mary had some potential to be a nice throwback to the blaxploitation movies of the past. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case, and instead we got a lackluster action movie that tried to be more than it should have been, and failed on all accounts. Taraji P. Henson played hitwoman, Mary, who works for an organized crime family in Boston, and after a hit that changed her life, she wants out and wants to help a young boy that was also affected by that hit. Henson does the most she can with the character, and even Danny Glover appears as the leader of the crime family. However, I just couldn’t get interested in the movie at all. Even the action-packed finale felt too tame for its own good.

 

Slender Man

Oh Slender Man, what happened?! Well, I kind of know what happened. The movie is, obviously years too late, and the producers of the movie had some creative differences with the studio about how to handle and market the movie. This lead to the studio – Sony – not only moving the movie around the release schedule on several occasions, but apparently cutting several key scenes leaving the movie a noticeably mess. Slender Man had potential, but with the studio getting involved, a weak script and uninteresting characters, Slender Man lacked any real substance to make it worthwhile.

 

The Happytime Murders

What the hell was this? No, seriously, what the hell was this? I’ll admit, I didn’t mind the concept that puppets can walk around in the human world, and suddenly someone is killing puppets from a popular TV show, and it’s up to a puppet and his former cop partner (Melissa McCarthy) to solve the case. The movie wasn’t well received by critics or by fans, and you can’t blame them. I didn’t really expect much from The Happytime Murders, but I didn’t think it would be an unfunny, cringe-worthy at times movie.

 

Truth or Dare

Blumhouse has a pretty good track record with their horror/thriller movies, and even managed to surprise some of us with Happy Death Day, which let’s be honest, we all thought was going to suck (yes, I am looking forward to Happy Death Day 2U). So with that said, Truth or Dare had some potential and a good lead in, but it sadly craps the bed. The characters aren’t great, it loses a lot of stream most of the time after it builds something up, and the effect of the demon is really dumb. There is only one character that stands out, and that’s Hayden Szeto’s Brad, who has a storyline that doesn’t really belong in the movie, but it’s actually a good storyline that gets wasted. Plus the ending for me was really dumb, and has been done before.

 

All right, so there are my worst, disappointments, least-liked films of the year. What were some of yours?

‘Hotel Artemis’ Review

Director: Drew Pearce

Writer: Drew Pearce

Cast: Jodie Foster, Sterling K. Brown, Sofia Boutella, Dave Bautista, Charlie Day, Brian Tyree Henry, Jenny Slate, Zachary Quinto and Jeff Goldblum

Synopsis: Set in riot-turn, near-future Los Angeles, ‘Hotel Artemis’ follows the Nurse, who runs a secret, members-only emergency room for criminals.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Hotel Artemis, the directorial debut of Iron Man 3 co-writer Drew Pearce, has been on my radar since it was announced. Sure the movie drew comparisons to John Wick right off the bat, so the question was what was the movie going to do to stand out? Well, Hotel Artemis does do enough to make it stand on its own, but unlike its spiritual counterpart – for the lack of a better phrase – Hotel Artemis would rather build up the tension for a grand finale.

Set in Los Angeles in 2028, the city is rioting over the lack of water, but during all of that, two brothers (Sterling K. Brown and Brian Tyree Henry) pull off a bank heist that doesn’t go as planned. After Henry’s character gets injured, Brown’s character takes him to the Hotel Artemis, a secret, members-only emergency room for criminals to go to get patched up and lay low. There, they met The Nurse (Jodie Foster), who runs the establishment with her head of security, Everest (Dave Bautista). The Nurse gives everyone there nicknames according to their rooms; Brown gets Waikiki, while Henry gets Honolulu.

As Waikiki’s brother gets patched up, we meet other occupants of Hotel Artemis in a loud and foul-mouthed businessman Acapulco (Charlie Day), the French assassin Nice (Sofia Boutella), and a cop played by Jenny Slate. Things look to be going smoothly until The Wolf King (Jeff Goldblum) enters the picture, and things go to hell pretty fast from there.

While the trailers and TV spots focus on the action in Hotel Artemis, you’ll be surprised – maybe disappointed if you were absolutely looking for that – that Pearce shows a lot of restraint and keeps the action to a minimal until the very end. What Pearce does instead is build up these characters and world before unleashing the action scenes, which is actually kind of refreshing.

Also, the fact that Pearce was able to get a cast like this on his first feature is quite the coup. Everyone nails their roles to a tee. Jodie Foster, despite being behind-the-camera for years now, reminds us why she was such a great actress. The Nurse is the most fleshed out character out of everyone, reaching every emotion available, and while he’s not as colorful as other characters like Day’s Acapulco, her character doesn’t lend to that anyway.

Sterling K. Brown’s Waikiki is a man with a plan for everything, and more level-head than anyone involved including his mess-up for a brother. Sofia Boutella’s Nice is arguably the most dangerous of them all, and has a history with Waikiki that sadly doesn’t play out the way Pearce probably intended it when he wrote the script. Dave Bautista’s Everest is what you’d expect from a Dave Bautista role by now, and that’s okay in my book. Charlie Day looks to be having some fun with his role, but it doesn’t quite click for me. Finally, Jeff Goldblum’s The Wolf King, the man that runs L.A., is really nothing more, sadly, than a glorified cameo. And while his short time on screen is great, it does lead to some important events for the rest of the movie.

Another thing that sets Hotel Artemis apart from other similar movies – yes it does have some sequel bait/world building – is the impressive production design by Ramsey Avery. We are told by The Nurse, that she has worked for the Artemis for twenty-two years. The halls and rooms look old, but some way they look like a room you’d find in nice hotel. Combine that with the cinematography by Chung-hoon Chung, who did It, and you got yourself a great looking movie.

All in all, Hotel Artemis is a solid action thriller that’s worth your time. What Drew Pearce was able to do with his familiar concept, and what he was able to get from his impressive cast for his first feature is impressive. Despite promotion making you think the movie is a shoot ‘em up action thriller, Hotel Artemis takes you down another road that is actually worth it. With a slow build for a big finale, great character development and fleshed out characters, and great production design and cinematography, Hotel Artemis is something to check it out, and something I wouldn’t mind seeing a sequel to.

Hotel Artemis

3.5 out of 5

New Podcast – Deadpool 2 & Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Trailers, Steven Spielberg Eyes DC Movie & More

The Movie Pit Podcast is up!

It’s a little later than usual. Okay, a lot later than usual, but these last few days have been pretty tough, so I apologize that that. BUT, there was a lot great movie news items this week.

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New Podcast: Hellboy Reboot, New Mutants Gets First Cast Members & More

The Movie Pit Podcast is up!

It’s been a bit since I’ve posted the podcast on here – at least regularly. Going to be fixing that.