My Favorite/Standout Performances of 2018

The end of the year doesn’t just mean putting out your best/favorite movies of year. It can be a time to also reflect the individuals like directors, actors, actress, supporting roles, villains and everything in between. So, that said, I’m here to do just that. We all have our favorites, and these are mine. This is of course my opinion. I tried to shorten the list as much as I could, but like every year, it was a bit too hard so I left the lists as such.

 

Also, villains are probably considered Supporting Actors/Actress in other lists, but again, to not only make the lists shorter, I want the villains to have their own category, because everyone loves a good villain, right?

 

Finally, everything and everyone will be in alphabetical order. Also, if someone is missing, it could be because I didn’t see them (aka missed the movie), or they just missed the list/had to be cut out. This is also part one of two different lists. Enjoy.

 

 

Directors

Ryan Coogler – Black Panther

John Krasinski – A Quiet Place

Anthony and Joe Russo – Avengers: Infinity War

Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey & Rodney Rothman – Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Alfonso Cuaron – Roma

Barry Jenkins – If Beale Street Could Talk

 

Honorable Mentions

Christopher McQuarrie – Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Spike Lee – BlacKkKlansman

Aneesh Chaganty – Searching

Boots Riley – Sorry to Bother You

Bradley Cooper – A Star Is Born

Drew Goddard – Bad Times at the El Royale

 

Just Missed the List

Leigh Whannell – Upgrade

David Gordon Green – Halloween

Debra Granik – Leave No Trace

Timo Tjahjanto – The Night Comes for Us

Julius Avery – Overlord

 

  

Actors

Ben Foster as Will – Leave No Trace

Lakeith Stanfield as Cassius Green – Sorry to Bother You

Ethan Hawke as Toller – First Reformed

John Cho as David Kim – Searching

 

Honorable Mentions

Richard E. Grant as Jack Hock – Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Richie Merritt as Rick Wershe Jr. – White Boy Rick

John David Washington as Ron Stallworth – BlacKkKlansman

 

Just Missed the List

Nick Offerman as Frank Fisher – Hearts Beat Loud

Henry Golding as Nick Young – Crazy Rich Asians

Robert Redford as Forrest Tucker – The Old Man & the Gun

Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong – First Man

Chris Hemsworth as Thor – Avengers: Infinity War

 

 

Actress

Toni Collette as Annie – Hereditary

Constance Wu as Rachel Chu – Crazy Rich Asians

Lady Gaga as Ally – A Star Is Born

Rachel Weisz as Lady Sarah – The Favourite

Yalitza Aparicio as Cleo – Roma

Amy Adams as Lynne Cheney – Vice

 

Honorable Mentions

Kelly Macdonald as Agnes – Puzzle

Melissa McCarthy as Lee Israel – Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Cynthia Erivo – Bad Times at the El Royale

Elsie Fisher as Kayla – Eighth Grade

Thomasin McKenize as Tom – Leave No Trace

 

Just Missed the List

Saoirse Ronan as Mary Stuart – Mary Queen of Scots

Vicky Krieps as Alma – Phantom Thread

Zoe Saldana as Gamora – Avengers: Infinity War

Charlize Theron as Marlo – Tully

Hailee Steinfeld as Charlie – Bumblebee

 

 

Supporting Actor

Adam Driver as Flip Zimmerman – BlacKkKlansman

Matthew McConaughey as Ricard Wershe Sr. – White Boy Rick

Billy Magnussen as Ryan – Game Night

Brian Tyree Henry as Daniel Carty – If Beale Street Could Talk

Winston Duke as M’Baku – Black Panther

 

Honorable Mentions

Jesse Plemons as Gary – Game Night

Sam Elliot as Bobby – A Star Is Born

Julian Dennison as Russell & Rob Delaney as Peter – Deadpool 2

 

Just Missed the List

Martin Freeman as Mike Priddle – Ghost Stories

Lewis Pullman as Miles Miller – Bad Times at the El Royale

Steve Carell as Donald Rumsfeld – Vice

 

 

Supporting Actress

Mackenzie Davis as Tully – Tully

Michelle Yeoh as Eleanor Young – Crazy Rich Asians

Milly Shapiro as Charlie – Hereditary

Millicent Simmonds as Regan Abbott – A Quiet Place

Regina King as Sharon Rivers – If Beale Street Could Talk

Emma Stone as Abigail – The Favourite

 

Honorable Mentions

Hari Nef as Bex – Assassination Nation

Danai Gurira as Okoye, Lupita Nyong’o as Nakia & Letitia Wright as Shuri – Black Panther

Lesley Manville as Cyril – Phantom Thread

Elizabeth Debicki as Alice – Widows

 

Just Missed the List

Shuya Sophia Cai as Meiying – The Meg

Abby Ryder Fortson as Cassie Lang & Hannah John-Kamen as Ava/Ghost – Ant-Man and the Wasp

Awkwafina as Peik Lin Goh – Crazy Rich Asians

Phoebe Waller-Bridge as L3-37 – Solo: A Star Wars Story

 

 

Villain

Michael B. Jordan as Erik Killmonger – Black Panther

Josh Brolin as Thanos – Avengers: Infinity War

James Jude Courtney as The Shape – Halloween

Linus Roache as Jeremiah Sand – Mandy

 

Honorable Mentions

Andy Serkis as Ulysses Klaue – Black Panther

Tom Vaughan-Lawlor as Ebony Maw – Avengers: Infinity War

Dian Sastrowardoyo as Alma – The Night Comes for Us

 

Just Missed the List

The Creatures – A Quiet Place

 

Be on the lookout for Part II coming.

Advertisements

New Podcast – Deadpool 2 & Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Trailers, Steven Spielberg Eyes DC Movie & More

The Movie Pit Podcast is up!

It’s a little later than usual. Okay, a lot later than usual, but these last few days have been pretty tough, so I apologize that that. BUT, there was a lot great movie news items this week.

Soundcloud Link – https://soundcloud.com/the-movie-pit

iTunes Link  – https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-movie-pit-podcast/id1249582608?mt=2

Youtube

‘Bridge of Spies’ Review

bridge_of_spies

Director: Steven Spielberg

Writers: Matt Charman, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen

Cast: Tom Hanks, Mark Rylance, Alan Alda, Austin Stowell, Jesse Plemons, Jon Rue, Scott Shepherd, Dakin Matthews, Mikhail Gorevoy, Sebastian Koch, Will Rogers and Amy Ryan

Synopsis: An American lawyer is recruited by the CIA during the Cold War to help rescue a pilot detained in the Soviet Union.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

The Cold War was an important time in American, and Soviet Union, history. Both sides were at odds with each other and more importantly, both sides wanted information on the other. Steven Spielberg manages to bring some of the mindset to the big screen with his latest film Bridge of Spies, and who better to help him than someone that has proven to give him great work in the past in Tom Hanks. However, Bridges of Spies, which is based on true events, is actually composed as two films in one. One being a courtroom drama and the other being a spy thriller. The two blend together rather well, while also faltering a bit as it tries to handle a bit too much.

While the whole film is set during the height of the Civil War, the first half of Bridges of Spies follows James Donovan, a successful insurance lawyer who is suddenly picked by the government to “defend” a supposed Soviet spy in Rudolf Abel (Rylance). The idea is for Donovan to put on a show for the public and make it looks like Abel is getting a fair trial, even though he will be found guilty. However, Donovan isn’t all that thrilled with the idea since he will become a hated man and not only put himself in danger, but his family’s safety as well. But, to Donovan, there is something about Abel that intrigues him and sees that Abel isn’t really getting a fair shot, so he actually does his best to try and actually do his job much to the chagrin of his co-workers.

MV5BMTcwNDc0NjY1MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMjQyNDI5NjE@._V1__SX1216_SY581_

The second half of Bridges of Spies follows the heavily promoted material of Hanks’ Donovan going to Berlin, thanks to the help of the CIA, to discuss and work out a trade for pilot Gary Powers (Stowell), who was shot down, for Abel. Of course, not everything goes as planned and Donovan has to worry about not only making this deal happen, but also getting back home alive.

There is no mistaking that Bridge of Spies belongs to Tom Hanks. Hanks brings his likeability and nice-guy demeanor to Donovan that not only makes his performance work well, and makes us easily root for him, but also enhances the film. Donovan may be a by-the-book kind of guy, but he cares and there are moments where he’s conflicted about doing what’s right and what people are telling him is right. Near the end of the film, he makes a decision based on a new predicament that occurs that is extremely dangerous, and could have had extreme consequences. However, at this point of the film we already know how he will react. It’s great to see, but looking back, you can easily see how dangerous that would have been.

1401x788-Screen-Shot-2015-06-05-at-1.27.03-PM

One of the things that also works extremely well is the relationship and chemistry between Hanks and Mark Rylance. It’s arguably the best working component of the film, and it disappears as Hanks and Rylance don’t share any screen time after the first act of the film. Thankfully, Hanks carries the film, but there is something about the relationship between Hanks and Rylance that makes the film tick and so engaging.

635803733909731613-SJP-JB-D25-04091

Rylance is also a standout on his own. The beginning of the film actually follows Rylance’s Abel in a cold – no pun intended – opening as we follow him, and as agents follow him too, doing what seems like a morning routine until he gets a call to pick up something that we, as the audience, know is incriminating. But Rylance doesn’t need to say anything – in fact, he doesn’t say much in terms of dialogue – because he has such an amazing screen presences that it helps not only his character, but the tension going in for the rest of the film.

129

However, despite amazing performances by Rylance and Hanks, the rest of the cast get only a few moments to shine, however not all of them work. Austin Stowell’s Gary Powers isn’t as intriguing as Abel, and after his introduction and getting shot down, he disappears with the exception of an integration scene. It’s kind of shame he’s not in the film more since he does play an important part for Hanks’ Donovan. Jesse Plemons also shows up as Powers’ friend and fellow pilot, but there isn’t really much for him to do. Amy Ryan pops in as Mary Donovan, who plays the part of concerned wife, but also somewhat understands why her husband does what he does.

MV5BMjEwNzI3NzQ3OF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMTQ4OTQ5NjE@._V1__SX1216_SY537_

Dakin Matthews plays Judge Byers during the first half of the film and does a pretty good job and reminds us that during this time of history, even people that are supposed to up hold the law took a side. Scott Shepherd plays CIA agent Hoffman which goes to Berlin with Donovan, and tries to keep Donovan on track that the deal is to make them the trade. Sebastian Koch plays Vogel, a man that Donovan thinks could help him with everything in Berlin, but something to Donovan feels off.

Bridge of Spies does stumble a bit near the middle of the film. A new plot point is introduced that doesn’t really do too much for the film other than give Donovan another obstacle to overcome. There are also a few plot points that a bought up, but never mentioned or even hinted at again as the film progresses. Yes, the film is all about Donovan and his task, but it would have been nice for the film to give some sort of resolution or a mention.

The film, again, really tries to put you in the mindset of the people living in the time. There is even a point in the film where Donovan makes a funny remark about his treatment in a certain place. Speaking of funny, Bridge of Spies has some surprisingly great humor injected into the film that breaks some of the tension and seriousness of the situations.

All in all, Bridge of Spies has a lot going on, and while most of it works, the missteps make it from being an even greater film. Tom Hanks and Mark Rylance’s chemistry makes the film pop and is the arguably the better part of the film, but make no mistake in saying that this film belongs to Hanks.

Bridge of Spies

4 out of 5

‘Black Mass’ Review

black_mass_ver3

Director: Scott Cooper

Writer(s): Mark Mallouk and Jez Butterworth

Cast: Johnny Depp, Joel Edgerton, Benedict Cumberbatch, Dakota Johnson, Jesse Plemons, Rory Cochrane, David Harbour, Julianne Nicholson, Kevin Bacon, Adam Scott, Peter Sarsgaard, and Corey Stoll

Synopsis: The true story of Whitey Bulger, the brother of a state senator and the most infamous violent criminal in the history of South Boston, who became an FBI informant to take down a Mafia family invading his turf.

 

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

*Reviewer Note 2: I fell behind on my movie watching, so some anticipate some more reviews this week*

 

Black Mass is based on the book “Black Mass: The True Story of an Unholy Alliance Between the FBI and the Irish Mob” written by Dick Lehr and Gerard O’Neill, and based on the true life of arguably one of the most notorious gangsters ever, James “Whitey” Bulger. Whether or not all the events in the film happen or not – two of the real life people that rolled with Bulger say some stuff was not true – the film is a brooding, dark, gritty and tremendously acted film.

 

The film stars in 1975 as we get an idea of who James, or Jimmy, “Whitey” Bulger (Depp) is to the people surrounded by him. The film is introduced by Kevin Weeks (Plemons) as he’s being integrated and says that Bulger was a small time guy and suddenly he became one of the biggest names in South Boston or Southie as they called it. From there we’re introduced to John Connolly (Edgerton), who has returned to Boston and has joined the FBI. His first ambitious move, reunite with his childhood friend Bulger and convince him to join forces to take down the Mafia running North Boston. Bulger seeing this as an opportunity to take down the competition agrees and here is what beings his reign as the kingpin of Boston.

 

MV5BMTgwMzcxMjkzNV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNTE4ODI3NjE@._V1__SX1214_SY537_

 

The film isn’t just about Bulger, the film is also about John Connolly. The two get the same amount of screen time and Connolly gets his hands a bit dirty in his own way as much as Bulger. Connolly thinks Bulger is the FBI’s saving grace against the Mafia in Boston and it clouds his judgment from time to time, and it makes him – arguably – as corrupt as Bulger. All of it, done well by the great and always reliable Joel Edgerton.

 

Here is where I run into a problem with Black Mass. The film itself is just okay, but it is elevated thanks to the performances of the impressive and huge cast. Depp and Edgerton at the forefront and the supporting cast play their parts well. Depp is back to true form here. This is the kind of films I like Depp in, where he show his true potential and great acting prowess. Forget the wacky roles that he’s been playing for years now, it is when he plays a serious and real character that you remember how great he is, and playing Bulger is one of those roles. He’s terrifying and intimidating when he has to be, that includes scenes with Dakota Johnson’s Lindsey Cyr and Julianne Nicholson’s Marianne Connolly, the wife of John Connolly. As good as he is as Bulger, he can also be rather charming when he has to be, which is rather odd to see after all the scenes that involve him being a terrible person.

 

Edgerton, on the other hand, has his fair share of great moments with and without Depp, but his character at times is so blinded by the myth that is Bulger that he becomes a bit distracted of his real duties as an FBI agent. He also becomes a bit cocky that he managed to get one of the most wanted criminals the bureau ever wanted to work for them instead of taking him down.

 

MV5BNjUwNjQ1MTIyN15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDA4ODI3NjE@._V1__SX1214_SY537_

 

The supporting cast all plays their parts on point and all have their moments to shine, considering how big the film is. Jesse Plemons’ Kevin Weeks and Rory Cochrane’s Steve Flemmi provide framing devices for the most part, but also Bulger’s most loyal allies that will follow him to the end, as does W. Earl Brown as John Martorano. David Harbour’s John Morris plays the more conflicted FBI agent when it comes to working with Bulger and has one of the best and most tension filled scenes that involves a recipe. Kevin Bacon pops in as head of the FBI section in Boston as Charles McGuire as does the surprise cast member of Adam Scott as Robert Fitzpatrick.

 

Unfortunately, some cast members don’t fare that well as others. Dakota Johnson, Julianne Nicholson and Juno Temple are the only real female characters in the film, but it feels like they don’t much as characters. Johnson and Nicholson have more substance to their roles but Johnson disappears after the first half hour of the film and her scenes with Depp are the best at getting some dimension from Depp’s Bulger, and you miss it afterwards. Corey Stoll appears at the end as new District Attorney Fred Wyshak and Peter Sarsgaard’s Brian Halloran is a bit all over the place and although his character calls for it, I could have seen anyone else playing that role. Finally, Benedict Cumberbatch, who plays U.S Senator Billy Bulger has literally about ten minutes – if that – of screen time and has only one real good scene with Edgerton near the beginning of the film. His brotherly connection to Jimmy Bulger isn’t even touched on too much, and they only have a couple scenes together. It’s kind of a shame really.

 

MV5BMTkzODk0MTUyNF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwOTg3ODI3NjE@._V1__SX1214_SY537_

 

So despite the great cast and performances, Black Mass doesn’t really do much in getting us more in the head of Bulger. It does early on with the scenes with Johnson’s Cyr but that’s about it. We don’t get more into his head at all and it probably tries to make up for it by giving those conflicted moral scenes to Edgerton’s Connolly, but great acting only takes you so far.

 

All in all, Black Mass is filled with by great performances led by Johnny Depp and Joel Edgerton. The film is a bit grim and hard to watch in some scenes, but the slow burn to the film may turn off some viewers anyway. Black Mass isn’t the perfect film or tale of Bulger’s legacy, but it worth the watch.

 

Black Mass

4 out of 5

MV5BMjQyNjY5NzgzNl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNTUzMzY0NTE@._V1__SX1216_SY581_