New Podcast – Ben Affleck Leaving the DCEU, Doctor Doom Movie, Movie Trailer & Ton More

The Movie Pit Podcast is live!

It was a big week, so the podcast is pretty long. Also, if Youtube is inconvenient, the podcast is on ITunes now too (link – https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-movie-pit-podcast/id1249582608?mt=2)

 

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Spider-Man: Homecoming Spoiler Review

The spoiler-filled review of Spider-Man: Homecoming is up!

Give it a listen, and if Youtube is too inconvenient for you, the podcast is up on ITunes now right here (id1249582608?mt=2)

‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Review

Director: Jon Watts

Writers: Jon Watts, Jonathan Goldstein, John Francis Daley, Christopher Ford, Chris McKenna, and Erik Sommers

Cast: Tom Holland, Robert Downey Jr., Michael Keaton, Jacob Batalon, Laura Harrier, Jon Favreau, Zendaya, Tony Revolori, Bokeem Woodbine, Donald Glover and Marisa Tomei

Synopsis: Several months after the events of Captain America: Civil War, Peter Parker, with the help of his mentor Tony Stark, tries to balance his life as an ordinary high school student in Queens, New York City while fighting as his superhero alter ego Spider-Man as a new threat, the Vulture, emerges.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

*Reviewer Note 2: There are two post-credit scenes.*

 

The second reboot of Spider-Man in the last 15 years is here, and dare I say, it might be the best one yet. Jon Watts has bought the real teenage aspect of Peter Parker which not only makes him a desperate young hero trying to prove himself, but also trying make it through the difficulties of high school. There other nice thing, there’s no origin story. Although the film does act as a pseudo-origin story given that Peter is finally becoming the Spider-Man we all know and love from the comics.

The film begins with, surprisingly, Michael Keaton’s Adrian Toomes with his clean-up crew after what looks like the Battle of New York from The Avengers, and suddenly getting kicked out, but not before taking some alien technology with them. We then jump forward to Peter Parker (Tom Holland) in a home movie-like video recapping the events of Captain America: Civil War, including some shots from the airport battle. After getting to keep the suit, we cut forward yet again a few months with Peter feeling left out and antsy to get back into the real action. That comes to fruition when he discovers a gang selling alien tech weapons lead by Adrian aka The Vulture. Peter then tries to take down Adrian and his crew, while also dealing with his best friend Ned (Jacob Batalon) who knows his secret, dealing with his crush from afar in Liz (Laura Harrier) and keeping his identity from his Aunt May (Marisa Tomei).

While on paper, Spider-Man: Homecoming sounds like it has a lot going on, but what Jon Watts and the writers were able to do here is nothing short of great. The film is actually over two hours along, but it never feels long. Homecoming moves at a brisk pace, all while being enjoyable and fun, but more importantly, it’s funny. The humor is top notch and while the film never goes full comedy, the humor is one of the many things that makes the film great.

The other nice thing about Homecoming is that it’s small stakes movie. There’s no end of the world or portal opening in the middle of the sky scenario. It’s Peter trying to stop a gang from selling alien tech weapons. Sure he fights a guy in an alien tech suit, with his super-suit and superpowers but it’s not like he’s a demigod or Iron Man. We see Peter as Spider-Man swinging around the city doing some things like stopping a guy from stealing a bike or even when he’s just being Peter, we see him go to a bodega to get a bite to eat. He really is, as cheesy as it sounds, a friendly neighborhood Spider-Man.

The reason why this works is simply because of Tom Holland. Holland is great as Peter and Spider-Man. He has the sensibility and humor a Peter Parker/Spider-Man needs and makes the role his own. Nothing against Toby Maguire and Andrew Garfield, but Holland is of the right age for the character and has a personality that we can easily follow and root for. He’s also still learning everything as he goes, and we see him fail, which is what we’ve been really missing from the previous installments. Sure he has the heart of a hero and is always trying to do the right thing, but he still doesn’t know when to step in and when to step away.

The rest of the cast is pretty great too. Let’s start off with the obvious – Robert Downey Jr. once again playing Tony Stark/Iron Man. While he’s in almost every promotion spot we’ve seen, he’s actually not in the movie that much, so if you had the fear that Iron Man/Stark would take over the film, he doesn’t. Michael Keaton as Adrian Toomes, since they never actually call him the Vulture, is okay as the villain. His reasoning does leave something to be desired, but you can see where he’s coming from, but I think it helps that he’s damn terrifying when he needs to be.

Jacob Batalon as Ned, Peter’s best friend and the only friend that knows he’s Spider-Man, is great here and his chemistry with Holland is fantastic. Zendaya as the deadpan schoolmate Michelle has her moments that are welcomed humorous moments. Laura Harrier as Peter’s love interest, Liz, doesn’t have much to do other than be something Peter can’t really have because of his alter-ego Jon Favreau once again plays Happy Hogan, who acts like a watch dog to Peter, although he struggles him off every chance he gets. Tony Revolori plays Flash Thompson, a high school rival/bully to Peter, and Bokeem Woodbine plays Shocker, the secondary villain that Peter/Spider-Man has to deal with.

Donald Glover appears as Aaron Davis, someone Spider-Man comes across for help. Unfortunately, Marisa Tomei as Aunt May is a little underwritten for me. Yes, the fact that she’s younger does play a funny little role in the film, but she doesn’t really give Peter a wise speech about being a kid or anything like that, she does have one moment like that, but I kind of wish they played her up more. Instead she is played as an over-protective aunt who tells Peter to run the other way when danger is put in front of him. However, this new attitude does get a nice payoff, but I still would have loved to see more of her.

Of course, there are many Easter Eggs for fans to fine, some are right in your face, while others fans may need to keep an eye out for it. Thankfully, Sony doesn’t overstuff the movie with them or try to force the Marvel Cinematic Universe in the film itself keeping everything Spider-Man related and watching him grow as the character that we all love and know.

All in all, Spider-Man: Homecoming is a hell of a lot of fun. From start to finish you are bound to love this movie. Tom Holland has solidified himself as Peter Parker/Spider-Man and I for one can’t wait to see where he takes the character next. The Easter Eggs to the history of the character do make the film all the more great consider where the potential can go, and I’m sure one particular one will get fans talking. However, I would highly recommend everyone to go watch Homecoming. It’s not a reboot for reboot stake or for Sony to make more money, it’s a Spider-Man movie that we’ve been waiting for.

Spider-Man: Homecoming

4.5 out of 5

 

New Podcast: Black Panther Teaser Trailer, X-Men: Dark Phoenix Gets Director and Eyes Jessica Chastain & More

The newest episode of The Movie Pit Podcast is here!

I talk about that Black Panther trailer that came out last weekend, the newest news on X-Men: Dark Phoenix including the possible addition of Jessica Chastain and the rest of the movie news of the week.

 

‘Logan’ Review

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Director: James Mangold

Writers: James Mangold, Michael Green, and Scott Frank

Cast: Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Dafne Keen, Boyd Holbrook, Stephen Merchant, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Eriq La Salle, Elise Neal, Quincy Fouse, and Richard E. Grant

Synopsis: In the near future, a weary Logan cares for an ailing Professor X in a hide out on the Mexican border. But Logan’s attempts to hide from the world and his legacy are up-ended when a young mutant arrives, being pursued by dark forces.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

17 years ago – yes, 17 years! – we saw a virtually unknown Australian actor take the role of the fan-favorite X-Men Wolverine in Hugh Jackman. While people had their doubts at the time – some still do – Jackman proved himself to handle the character well, and has earn the respect of many fans over the years. So when it was announced that Logan would be Jackman’s last go as Logan aka Wolverine, it was fair to say it has been the end of an era. So, was Jackman’s last ride worth it and the perfect way to send off Jackman? Yes, yes it was.

Set in the year 2029, mutants are almost all but extinct and there hasn’t been a mutant birth in some time. We find Logan (Hugh Jackman), who is now going by his birth name, James Howlett, as a limo driver in Texas to raise money. After long night he goes across the border to an abandoned facility where he hides and cares for an old and ailing Professor Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) with the help of another mutant, Caliban (Stephen Merchant). Before Logan can gather enough money to buy a boat so he and Charles can live out in the ocean, they cross paths with Laura (Dafne Keen), a young girl who is very similar to Logan in almost every regard. Now all together, they must run from a military force called The Reavers, lead by Donald Pierce (Body Holbrook) and a scientist in Dr. Zander Rice (Richard E. Grant) that are after Laura and will do anything to get her back.

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While the character, of course, originated in the comics and has appeared in every X-Men film and now has three solo films in what are essentially comic book/superhero films, Logan is a whole – no pun intended – animal altogether. Not only is the film rated R, and boy does it embrace that rating – seriously, wow – the film doesn’t feel like a comic book/superhero film. It actually comes off more like a neo-western and it’s better because of it. Instead of focusing on some Earth-ending event, it focuses mainly on Logan, the man, and him protecting his girl he hardly knows in this bleak future, and finally coming to terms with his mortality. We’ve seen the mortality question come up before, but we see it more here. And it is that reason while I think so many love this movie. Director James Mangold could have easily put some Earth-ending even here, but he didn’t. He knew who the star in this film is, and what fans have been dying to see, and he finally delivers it.

Hugh Jackman has already played version of Logan/Wolverine we’re use to, but his performance in Logan is something different. We see him finally beaten down and a broken version of himself. He’s not healing like he use to, his drinking a lot and cuts himself off from the world. Not only that, he has to help Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart), who due to his old age, his powers have become a bit unstable, but the chemistry between Jackman and Stewart in the film is the best we’ve seen. Stewart is finally able to cut loose and not worry about coming off as a mentor or professor and instead tells everything how it is. Seeing the two together at this stage in their lives makes the film even better, especially knowing that Stewart is also bowing out after this makes his performance equally bittersweet.

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However, if you want to talk about casting, you have to talk about Dafne Keen as Laura aka X-23. Making your film debut is always tough, but making your film debut in Logan as a badass killing machine who is mute is probably tougher. Keen will definitely be a fan-favorite walking out of the film, and not just for being badass but the fact that she can express so much of her emotions into a simple stare. I don’t know where director James Mangold and the casting directors found Keen, but I can’t wait to see what she does after this. Believe me, we’ll be seeing a lot more of Keen in the future.

However, despite the great casting from the good guy side – which also includes Stephen Merchant’s Caliban – the bad guy side of the spectrum falls apart fairly quickly. Even though the film isn’t about the villains, and more about Logan, is doesn’t mean the villains should suffer. Boyd Holbrook does a descent job as the head of the Reavers, Donald Pierce, but his smooth-talking persona fades away and is just another henchmen. Finally there’s Richard E. Grant, a scientist who has a connection to Laura, but his character isn’t in the film enough to really justify him really being there. He does play a part that is pivotal for the ending, but that’s really it.

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All in all, Logan is one of the best X-Men and best solo Wolverine film there’s been. It’s a beautifully done character film that ends the era of Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine in the best way possible. A brutal one, but a respectful and proper way to send off Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart, while introducing Dafne Keen. Logan is one of the films that will have you talking afterwards and have you thinking back at how great it is.

Logan

4.5 out of 5

New Podcast: Oscar Nominations, The Flash Rewrite, Star Wars’ New Title, & More

A new podcast is up!

‘Doctor Strange’ Review

Director: Scott Derrickson

Writers: Scott Derrickson, Jon Spaihts, and C. Robert Cargill

Cast: Benedict Cumberbatch, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams, Benedict Wong, Mads Mikkelsen, Michael Stuhlbarg, Scott Adkins, Benjamin Bratt, and Tilda Swinton

Synopsis: A former neurosurgeon embarks on a journey of healing only to be drawn into the world of the mystic arts.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

*Reviewer Note 2: There are two post-credit scenes.*

*Reviewer Note 3: I do think the best experience of watching the film is in 3D. I know the extra ticket price and 3D in general might be a pain, but I think it’s worth it to gain the full experience.*

 

 

It feels like the last three years, Marvel has released films that everyone has either doubts about or feels like Marvel is taking too big of a risk. First it was Guardians of the Galaxy, then Ant-Man, and this year is Doctor Strange. And of course, every year those doubts are proven wrong. Not only is Doctor Strange another great addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, it truly is unlike anything Marvel has ever done onscreen.

The film follows Doctor Stephen Strange (Cumberbatch), highly popular but arrogant surgeon whose life gets turned upside when he’s in a sudden car accident that severely injuries his hands. When he runs out of options to gets his hands better, he heads to Nepal to search for someone that could potentially cure him. That person is The Ancient One (Swinton), who then reveals to Strange that her way is through the mystic arts. While Strange is learning things he never thought were possible, an old student of The Anicent One, Kaecilius (Mikkelsen) is trying to open a portal to The Dark Dimension and summon a dangerous entity in Dormammu.

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Like the previous films I’ve mentioned, Doctor Strange was a risk for Marvel since not many causal movie fans will know who Doctor Strange is, but more importantly, the film is adding something and putting front and center in the MCU: magic. The interdimensional aspect of the film only works because of director Scott Derrickson. He was able to bring some really great and awesome looking visual effects that I’ve rarely ever seen on film. It also helps that Derrickson has worked in horror, because you can see that in some of the shots, especially when the Dark Dimension comes into play. You will definitely walk away talking about the visuals of Doctor Strange. Also, for a film that delves into magic quite a bit, I was surprised how much hand-to-hand combat there was in the film. Not complaining, just an observation.

When it comes to the film itself, Doctor Strange does feel familiar in terms of what we’ve seen before from Marvel in the way of an origin story. We see the arrogant and egotistical character on the top of his game when suddenly something tragic happens and he’s having a self-made crisis until he has to rise to the occasion and prove himself. Of course, it’s always nice to see those stories play out, and Doctor Strange does enough to make that formula work for it, instead of against it.

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Benedict Cumberbatch is pretty much perfect as Doctor Stephen Strange. He finds the right balance of arrogance and likeability to keep us invested in his story until the very end. However, one of the big highlights – cast wise – is Tilda Swinton as The Ancient One. “White-washing” controversy aside, which never made sense to me because it’s Tilda Swinton, she almost steals the show every time she’s onscreen. She also has her own balance of being a mentor, but someone who must keep her distance from people because of the responsibly of being the Sorcerer Supreme.

Chiwetel Ejiofor’s Mordo has his own history before the film that is hinted at, but is a by-the-books kind of warrior that teaches Strange along the way. Benedict Wong’s Wong is another highlight of the film, although I wish we had a little more with him. When it comes to Mads Mikkelsen’s villain Kaecilius, I’m sure many will see him as another underdeveloped villain that doesn’t fix Marvel’s villain problem. I wouldn’t be doing a good job of a reviewer if I didn’t agree with that to some extent.

Kaecilius doesn’t see himself as a villain and that usually makes the best kind of villains. Everything he does he thinks is for a grander purpose and makes a sound enough reason for his actions when he goes face-to-face with Strange, something even he points out that sounds good in theory, but in action not so much. However, the thing that keeps us invest in Kaecilius’ story – even for a moment – is Mikkelsen, who is always great in everything he does, and the same can be said here. But, it would have been nice to spend more time with him, and even see just a bit on how he became the way he becomes onscreen instead of just being told.

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One of the biggest cast missteps is Rachel McAdams’ Christine Palmer. There’s no denying McAdams is a great actress, and anytime she’s in something you know she’s going to give one hundred percent. However, here, she entirely wasted. Palmer doesn’t add much to the story. She does have one key moment before the final act of the film, but that is about it. Although, many probably won’t know him too much, Michael Stuhlbarg pops in the film as Dr. Nicohemus West, a character from the comics, and somewhat rival to Strange, but it’s nothing more than a lesser supporting role.

All in all, Doctor Strange is truly unlike anything Marvel has ever done before in terms of visuals and the “out there-ness” of it all. While the film does have some familiar beat-for-beat origin story Marvel moments, and loses just a bit of steam in the final act, Benedict Cumberbatch and Tilda Swinton keeps us invest from start to finish.

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Doctor Strange

4 out of 5