‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Review

Director: Stefano Sollima

Writer: Taylor Sheridan

Cast: Josh Brolin, Benicio Del Toro, Isabela Moner, Jeffrey Donovan, Elijah Rodriguez, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo, Catherine Keener and Matthew Modine

Synopsis: The drug war on the US-Mexico border has escalated as the cartels have begun trafficking terrorists across the US border. To fight the war, federal agent Matt Graver re-teams with the mercurial Alejandro.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

I was fortunate enough to get to watch Sicario: Day of the Soldado – it was still called Sicario 2: Soldado at the time – all the way back in February of this year, but had to sit on my thoughts because of an NDA (Non-Disclosure Agreement). Now, the movie’s out and I can finally release this review. The review will be a combination of my first thoughts watching the movie, and my re-watch from this weekend. So, that said, let’s get to it.

Day of the Soldado opens by letting us know that the cartels make big business by trafficking people, and have now moved to terrorists. After a horrifying scene at a department store, the government has put the drug cartels on their list of dangerous threats. They call on someone with some experience in the field in Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) to run an operation on taking them down. In turn he recruits his old partner Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro) to help him, especially since Alejandro still has anger toward them for killing his family.

The mission is to make it look like the cartels are attacking each other, and one of those attempts is kidnapping the daughter of a kingpin, Isabela Reyes (Isabela Moner). Of course, not everything goes as planned. Now, Matt and Alejandro have to figure out how they will survive with all sides closing in on them.

The first Sicario, which came out in 2015, was a surprisingly dark thriller that wasn’t afraid to go there and pushed our expectations on what a movie with this kind of material should be. So when a sequel was announced, many like myself, were eager to see what they would do, and how they would put us back into this world they created in the first film. Now, before we move on, obviously with the real-world issues going on at the border, it will probably be a little hard to watch this, without trying to bring it into the conversation. However, at this point, the conversation feels dated because the real-life issues are more horrifying. But, let’s just move on from that.

Unfortunately, Day of the Soldado doesn’t quite live up to the sequel expectations that the film should have had. The film at times feels rather empty, and instead of going for more character development or deeper story points like the first film did, it goes for the easy bloodshed and violence. That’s fine for the world the movie has created, but after watching Sicario, I wanted more of that great character development. Violence is expected in these movies, but I wanted more from the story itself.

On top of that, the sequel does feel like a proper sequel. By that I mean, even though the sequel has different people behind the scenes, they tried very hard – and sometimes actually pulled it off – to make you think the sequel was directed by Denis Villeneuve, and the cinematography was done by Roger Deakins. Of course, that’s not the case with the movie being directed by Stefano Sollima and the cinematography was done by Dairusz Wolski (Prometheus, Alien: Covenant, All the Money in the World). The score, which is great, was done by Hildur Guonadottir, who actually worked on the first film’s score and on films like The Revenant and Arrival. He builds off the amazing score that was done by the late Johann Johannsson, who sadly passed away between the films.

Thankfully, the cast is solid to make the missteps worth it. Brolin gets a bigger role in the sequel, and gets to play around with the character a lot more. Benicio Del Toro as Alejandro is once again great to watch, and how he engages with Isabela Moner’s Isabela and others – which aren’t many by the way – is good, but none of them are really like the Emily Blunt character from Sicario. Moner is fine as Isabela who knows what her father does, and uses it sometimes, but is still a young girl caught up in a bad situation. Everyone else like the returning Jeffrey Donovan as Graver’s other right-hand man, Steve Forsing, is a welcome sight, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo has a small but effective role, and Matthew Modine and Catherine Keener basically have cameo roles, especially Modine.

The only blemish on the cast, for me, is Elijah Rodriguez as Miguel. It’s nothing against Rodriguez and his acting, but rather the character direction or the lack thereof. The movie almost treats Miguel as someone we saw in the first movie, and that’s a problem especially considering where his character ends up at the end of the film. I wouldn’t consider this a spoiler, because it’s known – at least online – that after the success of Sicario, the plan was to make the series a trilogy. That’s made very clear with Miguel’s character, but for me, the character and the arc doesn’t feel deserved or developed enough for me to care.

All in all, Sicario: Day of the Soldado, for me, wasn’t as good as the first film. While it ups the violence you would expect from this world, it leaves behind the story and characters just a bit. That’s not to say the sequel is a bad movie, because it’s not. There are some standout scenes, and even some shocking scenes that I couldn’t believe they approved. The cast is still great, and while I wasn’t a huge fan of how they left the movie at the end, I would gladly step back into this world when/if a third movie comes out.

Sicario: Day of the Soldado

3.5 out of 5

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’47 Meters Down’ Review

Director: Johannes Roberts

Writers: Johannes Roberts and Ernest Riera

Cast: Mandy Moore, Claire Holt, Chris Johnson, Yani Gellman, Santiago Segura and Matthew Modine

Synopsis: Two sisters vacationing in Mexico are trapped in a shark cage at the bottom of the ocean. With less than an hour of oxygen left and great white sharks circling nearby, they must fight to survive.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Shark movies can be both serious and straight-laced or they can be cheesy and dumb fun – or straight up campy – but there is no doubting you are probably bound to have some fun watching them.  While shark movies – not you Sharknado – have kind of come and gone, there is one that eventually comes out and could surprise us. So is 47 Meters Down worth the deep dive? Let’s find out.

The film follows sisters Lisa (Mandy Moore) and Kate (Claire Holt) as they are vacationing in Mexico. Lisa is recently getting over a break-up, and just wants to stay in the hotel, while Kate is the more adventurous sister, who is happy her older sister dragged her out on vacation. After partying with two locals in Louis (Yani Gellman) and Benjamin (Santiago Segura), they tell him they should trying cage diving with sharks. After some convincing from Kate and the guys, Lisa agrees. The next day they meet the guys and Captain Taylor (Matthew Modine), who put them in the cage and lowers them.

Everything goes well at first, but eventually the winch on the boat snaps and sends the cage with Lisa and Kate in it down to the ocean floor. With their oxygen running low, and sharks within the area ready to attack, the sisters have to find a way to survive and make it back up to the surface.

47 Meters Down is a bit frustrating. Not because it’s a overtly terrible movie, it’s actually pretty descent, but the movie is extremely underdeveloped. None of the characters are really fleshed out enough, which makes it a little hard to really root for them as we should. Sure we are hoping they’ll be okay when the sharks show up, but even when they scream and panic, it’s still a little hard. We know the bare amount of Lisa and Kate – Lisa is overly-cautious and doesn’t get out of her comfort zone enough, while Kate is the more adventurous and despite being the younger sister, she has to calm and convince Lisa into everything. The supporting characters are almost non-existent with Louis and Benjamin disappearing as soon as they appear, and Matthew Modine’s Captain Taylor is heard through a walkie-talkie the sisters have and even comes off as shady when he’s introduced.

The movie does work better on the technical side of things. Cinematographer Mark Silk sets up some effective low-light shots that makes the shark attacks unpredictable and adds some much needed tension to the film. Also, it helps that there is not music building up to a potential attack either, essentially putting us in the Lisa and Kate’s shoes for most of the film. Even on that end, director Johannes Roberts makes some of the action hard to follow and lingers on other shots for far too long, which doesn’t make sense since the film clocks in at right under an hour-and-a-half.

All in all, 47 Meters Down is only a descent movie that never reaches its potential full potential. Even with some okay scares with its great cinematography, the characters are never fully developed which hurts the film at the end. There is also a little something thrown in at the end that I’m eager to see how people react too. Personally, the film doesn’t really earn it.

47 Meters Down

2.5 out of 5