‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Review

Director: Jon Watts

Writers: Jon Watts, Jonathan Goldstein, John Francis Daley, Christopher Ford, Chris McKenna, and Erik Sommers

Cast: Tom Holland, Robert Downey Jr., Michael Keaton, Jacob Batalon, Laura Harrier, Jon Favreau, Zendaya, Tony Revolori, Bokeem Woodbine, Donald Glover and Marisa Tomei

Synopsis: Several months after the events of Captain America: Civil War, Peter Parker, with the help of his mentor Tony Stark, tries to balance his life as an ordinary high school student in Queens, New York City while fighting as his superhero alter ego Spider-Man as a new threat, the Vulture, emerges.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

*Reviewer Note 2: There are two post-credit scenes.*

 

The second reboot of Spider-Man in the last 15 years is here, and dare I say, it might be the best one yet. Jon Watts has bought the real teenage aspect of Peter Parker which not only makes him a desperate young hero trying to prove himself, but also trying make it through the difficulties of high school. There other nice thing, there’s no origin story. Although the film does act as a pseudo-origin story given that Peter is finally becoming the Spider-Man we all know and love from the comics.

The film begins with, surprisingly, Michael Keaton’s Adrian Toomes with his clean-up crew after what looks like the Battle of New York from The Avengers, and suddenly getting kicked out, but not before taking some alien technology with them. We then jump forward to Peter Parker (Tom Holland) in a home movie-like video recapping the events of Captain America: Civil War, including some shots from the airport battle. After getting to keep the suit, we cut forward yet again a few months with Peter feeling left out and antsy to get back into the real action. That comes to fruition when he discovers a gang selling alien tech weapons lead by Adrian aka The Vulture. Peter then tries to take down Adrian and his crew, while also dealing with his best friend Ned (Jacob Batalon) who knows his secret, dealing with his crush from afar in Liz (Laura Harrier) and keeping his identity from his Aunt May (Marisa Tomei).

While on paper, Spider-Man: Homecoming sounds like it has a lot going on, but what Jon Watts and the writers were able to do here is nothing short of great. The film is actually over two hours along, but it never feels long. Homecoming moves at a brisk pace, all while being enjoyable and fun, but more importantly, it’s funny. The humor is top notch and while the film never goes full comedy, the humor is one of the many things that makes the film great.

The other nice thing about Homecoming is that it’s small stakes movie. There’s no end of the world or portal opening in the middle of the sky scenario. It’s Peter trying to stop a gang from selling alien tech weapons. Sure he fights a guy in an alien tech suit, with his super-suit and superpowers but it’s not like he’s a demigod or Iron Man. We see Peter as Spider-Man swinging around the city doing some things like stopping a guy from stealing a bike or even when he’s just being Peter, we see him go to a bodega to get a bite to eat. He really is, as cheesy as it sounds, a friendly neighborhood Spider-Man.

The reason why this works is simply because of Tom Holland. Holland is great as Peter and Spider-Man. He has the sensibility and humor a Peter Parker/Spider-Man needs and makes the role his own. Nothing against Toby Maguire and Andrew Garfield, but Holland is of the right age for the character and has a personality that we can easily follow and root for. He’s also still learning everything as he goes, and we see him fail, which is what we’ve been really missing from the previous installments. Sure he has the heart of a hero and is always trying to do the right thing, but he still doesn’t know when to step in and when to step away.

The rest of the cast is pretty great too. Let’s start off with the obvious – Robert Downey Jr. once again playing Tony Stark/Iron Man. While he’s in almost every promotion spot we’ve seen, he’s actually not in the movie that much, so if you had the fear that Iron Man/Stark would take over the film, he doesn’t. Michael Keaton as Adrian Toomes, since they never actually call him the Vulture, is okay as the villain. His reasoning does leave something to be desired, but you can see where he’s coming from, but I think it helps that he’s damn terrifying when he needs to be.

Jacob Batalon as Ned, Peter’s best friend and the only friend that knows he’s Spider-Man, is great here and his chemistry with Holland is fantastic. Zendaya as the deadpan schoolmate Michelle has her moments that are welcomed humorous moments. Laura Harrier as Peter’s love interest, Liz, doesn’t have much to do other than be something Peter can’t really have because of his alter-ego Jon Favreau once again plays Happy Hogan, who acts like a watch dog to Peter, although he struggles him off every chance he gets. Tony Revolori plays Flash Thompson, a high school rival/bully to Peter, and Bokeem Woodbine plays Shocker, the secondary villain that Peter/Spider-Man has to deal with.

Donald Glover appears as Aaron Davis, someone Spider-Man comes across for help. Unfortunately, Marisa Tomei as Aunt May is a little underwritten for me. Yes, the fact that she’s younger does play a funny little role in the film, but she doesn’t really give Peter a wise speech about being a kid or anything like that, she does have one moment like that, but I kind of wish they played her up more. Instead she is played as an over-protective aunt who tells Peter to run the other way when danger is put in front of him. However, this new attitude does get a nice payoff, but I still would have loved to see more of her.

Of course, there are many Easter Eggs for fans to fine, some are right in your face, while others fans may need to keep an eye out for it. Thankfully, Sony doesn’t overstuff the movie with them or try to force the Marvel Cinematic Universe in the film itself keeping everything Spider-Man related and watching him grow as the character that we all love and know.

All in all, Spider-Man: Homecoming is a hell of a lot of fun. From start to finish you are bound to love this movie. Tom Holland has solidified himself as Peter Parker/Spider-Man and I for one can’t wait to see where he takes the character next. The Easter Eggs to the history of the character do make the film all the more great consider where the potential can go, and I’m sure one particular one will get fans talking. However, I would highly recommend everyone to go watch Homecoming. It’s not a reboot for reboot stake or for Sony to make more money, it’s a Spider-Man movie that we’ve been waiting for.

Spider-Man: Homecoming

4.5 out of 5

 

‘The Founder’ Review

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Director: John Lee Hancock

Writer: Robert D. Siegel

Cast: Michael Keaton, Nick Offerman, John Carroll Lynch, Linda Cardellini, B.J. Novak, Laura Dern, Justin Randell Brooke, Kate Kneeland and Patrick Wilson

Synopsis: The story of Ray Kroc, a salesman who turned two brothers’ innovative fast food eatery, McDonald’s, into one of the biggest restaurant business in the world with a combination of ambition, persistence and ruthlessness.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

We all know it, you’ve all eaten there, and its easily recognizable anywhere we go: McDonalds. Now the question is, do you know what the story behind the mega food chain is? Do you care? That’s what The Founder wants you to know and feel while watching. It’s a interesting, frustrating and engaging story that I’m surprised I’ve never heard before, and maybe you haven’t either.

The Founder tells the true story of Ray Kroc, a down on this luck traveling salesman, who at the beginning of the film is selling milkshake machines. When he hears about a surprisingly large order, he decides to check it out and travels to San Bernardino, California and finds McDonalds. Surprised by the quickness of getting orders out, he meets the owners in brothers Mac (John Carroll Lynch) and Dick (Nick Offerman) McDonald and convinces them they should franchise the restaurant. Mac and Dick reluctantly agree and give Ray the run down and have him go do just that. What follows is the story of how a small family business became a world phenomenon, the lives it affected.

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The film is built around Michael Keaton, who hits it out of the park as Ray Kroc. Seeing him go from barely selling machines to owning a business is a performance that needs to be seen. Going from a somewhat modest seller to becoming a bit snarky back-stabbing business man is something where it’s hard to imagine this was the same person. You can make the argument that maybe Ray is in the right, and maybe he was to some extent, but the way he treats the McDonald’s and takes the credit does make him an easy villain, for the lack of a better word. Also, seeing a man being slowly corrupted by the idea that he sees could be a massive success is worth the price of the ticket alone, and makes a great character study.

When it comes to the McDonald’s, John Carroll Lynch and Nick Offerman are equally fantastic in their own right. Their portray as the brothers does make Ray’s betrayal harder because the two really are extremely likable, and you know from the very beginning they aren’t in it for the money, but for the pure joy of being the best burger and “fast-food” place around.

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The rest of the cast does great in their small roles, although some are overshadowed by Keaton. Laura Dern plays Ray’s first wife Ethel Kroc, who is a stay-at-home wife and handles a lot of the drama-side of the things, Linda Cardellini and Patrick Wilson pop in as Joan and Rollie Smith, who invests in Ray and leads to subplot that is a bit ham-fisted for me personally, but Cardellini gets the bigger role there. B.J. Novak plays Ray’s lawyer, Harry J. Sonneborn, near the end of the film, and Kate Kneeland plays June Martino who is Ray’s secretary.

All in all, The Founder will definitely strike a cord with people. Whether you see Ray as taking an opportunity and running with it, or seeing him as the villain for stealing a great idea from people who worked hard to get it. The film really lets you decide for yourself, and makes that debate even harder with the standout performances by John Carroll Lynch, Nick Offerman, and more importantly, Michael Keaton.

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The Founder

4 out of 5

January Movie Releases

Happy New Year!!

That’s right, ladies and gentlemen, we have a new year in front of us which means one thing: new movies! Now, January is usually referred to as Hollywood’s “Dump” Month. Meaning they will release movies that they don’t think will perform well or are not confident in. Sometimes that is the case, but sometimes a movie will shine through. January is also filled with expanded releases of movies that came out in December so there is also that to look forward to.

You’ll notice that I will put the companies attached and responsible for releasing the film as well. Just trying something new to expand the page a bit and instead of posters, now you’ll be seeing trailers. I’ll try to update whenever new trailers come out.

 

 

6th

 

Wide Release: Hidden Figures

Based on the book my Margot Lee Shetterly, a team of African-American women provide NASA with important mathematical data needed to launch the program’s first successful space missions. I had the opportunity to watch the film on its limited release late last year, and I have to say it is a fantastic film. Do yourself a favor and go watch this. The film stars Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kevin Costner, Jim Parsons, Kirsten Dunst, Mahershala Ali, Aldis Hodge and Glen Powell.

 

Wide Release: A Monster Calls (Fantasy Drama – Focus Features/Participant Media/River Road Entertainment/Apaches Entertainment/La Trini)

Based on a script and book by Patrick Ness, A Monster Calls follows a boy as he seeks the help of a tree monster to cope with his single mom terminal illness. The film stars Liam Neeson as The Monster, Felicity Jones as the Mother, Sigourney Weaver as the Grandmother, Toby Kebbell as Dad, and Lewis MacDougall as the boy and Lily-Rose Aslandogdu as Lily.

 

Underworld: Blood Wars (Action – Screen Gems/Lakeshore Entertainment/Sketch Films)

Selene (Kate Beckinsale) returns to once again try and end the war between the Lycan clan and the Vampire fraction that betrayed her. Blood Wars does look like a step-up from the last film, but I don’t know how the film will actually turn out. The film also stars Theo James, Tobias Menzies, Lara Pulver, and Charles Dance.

 

 

13th

Wide/Expansion Release: Patriots Day

 

Limited Release: The Comedian

A look at the life of an aging insult comic played by Robert De Niro. The film also stars Leslie Mann, Danny DeVito, Cloris Leachman, Harvey Keitel, Eddie Falco and Billy Crystal.

 

Wide Release: Live By Night

Based off the novel of the same name by Dennis Lehane, Ben Affleck writes, directs and stars in this great looking film that is set during the Prohibition and follows Joe Coughlin, the son of a prominent Boston police captain, as he rises through the ranks of the criminal underworld and the trouble he falls into along the way. Besides the film looking great, it has a great cast in Zoe Saldana, Elle Fanning, Sienna Miller, Brendan Gleeson, Chris Sullivan, Anthony Michael Hall, Titus Welliver, Max Casella, Chris Messina, and Chris Cooper.

 

Wide Release: Silence 

Based on the book by Shusaku Endo, Martin Scorsese directs this historic drama set in the seventh century when two Jesuit priests (Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver) face violence and persecution when they travel to Japan to locate their mentor (Liam Neeson) and propagate Catholicism. Based off the trailer the film looks very powerful, and the early word from its limited release has made that statement true. Now tith its wide release, hopefully we’ll get a chance to experience that. Silence also stars Tadanobu Asano, and Ciaran Hinds.

 

The Bye Bye Man (Horror Thriller – STX Entertainment/Intrepid Pictures/Los Angles Media Fund)

An adaptation of the short story “The Bridge to Body Island,” by Robert Damon Schneck, the story centers on three Wisconsin college students in the 1990s, who move into an old house off campus. They unwittingly unleash a supernatural entity known as The Bye Bye Man, who comes to pretty upon them once they discover his name. The friends must try to save each other, all the while keeping The Bye Bye Man’s existence a secret to save others from the same deadly fate. The film looks okay, and a bit cheesy based on the first trailer – at least for me. This is actually the third move for the film as it was set for an October release, then a June release, then a early December release, and now this date.

 

Monster Trucks (Sci-Fi Adventure – Paramount Pictures/Paramount Animation/Nickeldeon Movies)

Another film that was moved three times now, although this one was done to complete post-production, Monster Trucks takes the idea of the popular derby and flips it on its head by making it literal. There are alien monsters that take over trucks and are on the run. Of course humans help them and what follows is some insane looking over-the-top action. Stars Lucas Till, Jane Levy, Rob Lowe, Amy Ryan, Barry Pepper, Samara Weaving, Holt McCallany, Frank Whaley, Thomas Lennon, and Danny Glover.

 

Sleepless (Action Thriller – Open Road Films/FilmNation Entertainment/Vertigo Entertainment/Riverstone Pictures)

A remake of French film Nuit Blanche (which I highly recommend you watch), a cop with a connection to the criminal underworld scours a nightclub in search of his kidnapped son. The film look okay, I was a huge fan of the original film, and this one does look like they’re upping the action, which is fine if the movie turns out good. The film stars Jamie Foxx, Gabrielle Union, Michelle Monaghan, David Harbour, T.I., and Scoot McNairy.

 

20th

Limited Release: The Red Turtle

Produced by the famous Studio Ghibli, the dialogue-less film follows the major life stages of a castaway on a deserted tropical island populated by turtles, crabs and birds.

 

Wide Release: 20th Century Women

 

The Resurrection of Gavin Stone (Family Romance Comedy – High Top Releasing/WWE Studios)

Gavin Stone (Brett Dalton), a washed up former child star, is forced to do community service at a local megachurch and pretends to be Christian so he can land the part of Jesus in their annual Passion Play, only to discover that the most important role of life is far from Hollywood. The film also stars Neil Flynn, Anjelah Johnson-Reyes, Liam Matthews, D.B. Sweeney, and WWE Legend Shawn Michaels.

 

The Founder (Biography Drama – The Weinstein Company/FilmNation Entertainment/The Combine)

Michael Keaton stars in this film that tells the story of McDonald’s founder, Ray Kroc. I don’t think I’ve ever actually thought about the story of McDonald’s and since I’ve seen the trailer, it’s peaked my interest and I’m sure to many others as well. Also, the studio has high hopes as they moved the film from its release date last year in August to prime Oscar contention time. The rest of the cast includes Laura Dern, Patrick Wilson, Linda Cardellini, Nick Offerman, B.J. Novak, and John Carroll Lynch.

 

 

Split (Thriller – Universal Pictures/Blumhouse Productions/Blinding Edge Pictures)

M. Night Shyamalan is back at it. The film stars James McAvoy as Kevin, a man with at least 23 different personalities, is compelled to abduct three teenage girls. As they are held captive, a final personality – “The Beast” – begins to materialize. The film also stars Anya Taylor-Joy, Haley Lu Richardson, Sterling K. Brown and Betty Buckley. Honestly, this doesn’t look that bad. McAvoy looks like he’d nailing the role and it actually looks like a cool and effective thriller.

 

xXx: The Return of Xander Cage (Action Thriller – Paramount Pictures)

Directed by D.J. Caruso (Disturbia, Eagle Eye, I Am Number Four), Xander Cage (Vin Diesel), thought to be dead, is bought back by his handler Augustus Gibbons (Samuel L. Jackson) to lead a team to stop a massive attack. The film also stars Nina Dobrev, Donnie Yen, Ruby Rose, Tony Jaa, Toni Collette, Rory McCann, and Deepika Padukone.

 

27th

A Dog’s Purpose (Dramedy – Universal Pictures/Amblin Entertainment/Walden Media/DreamWorks SKG)

Based on the novel by W. Bruce Cameron and directed by Lasse Hallstrom (What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, Dear John, The Hundred-Foot Journey), the film follows a dog (voiced by Bradley Cooper), who looks to discover his purpose in life over the course of several lifetimes and owners. The film also stars Britt Robertson, Peggy Lipton, John Ortiz, and Dennis Quaid.

 

Bastards (Comedy – Warner Bros./Alcon Entertainment/The Montecito Picture Company/DMG Entertainment)

Upon learning that their mother has been lying to them for years about their allegedly deceased father, two fraternal twin brothers hit the road in order to find him. The film stars Owen Wilson, Ed Helms, Glenn Close, Ving Rhames, Terry Bradshaw, and J.K. Simmons.

 

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (Screen Gems/Constantin Film International/Capcom Entertainment)

The last installment of the Milla Jovovich and Paul W.S. Anderson Resident Evil series, which could be a good or bad thing, depending on how you feel about the series. The Final Chapter picks ups immediately after the events from the last film and follows Alice (Jovovich) returning to Raccoon City where the Umbrella Corporation is gathering forces for a final strike against the only remaining survivors. The film will bring back Ali Larter as Claire Redfield, Iain Glen as Dr. Alexander Isaacs and Shawn Roberts as Albert Wesker with new cast members Ruby Rose, William Levy, Eoin Macken, and international star Rola.

 

Gold (Drama Thriller – TWC-Dimension/Black Bear Pictures/Living Films/Hwy61)

An unlikely pair venture to the Indonesian jungle in search of gold. The film is giving off a semi-American Hustle vibe and seeing Matthew McConaughey lose himself in the character should be interesting to watch. The film also stars Bryce Dallas Howard, Edgar Ramirez, Toby Kebbell, Rachael Taylor, Corey Stoll, Bruce Greenwood, Bill Camp, and Stacy Keach

 

What are you looking forward to?

New Podcast – Thor: Ragnarok, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Paul Feig Talks Ghostbusters & More

Who’s ready for another podcast?

This week I tackle Michael B. Jordan’s casting in Black Panther, Transformers 5, Sherlock Holmes 3, Andy Serkis’ darker toned Jungle Book film, Dwayne Johnson joining a cinematic universe, DC Films making some major changes and a movie with Harley Quinn in the works, and Paul Feig’s reaction to Ghostbusters internet reactions, Thor: Ragnarok’s big cast, and Spider-Man: Homecoming’s Villain and Michael Keaton possibly coming back.

 

Also, I’ll have a written reviews of Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising, The Nice Guys, and maybe The Angry Birds Movie this weekend. So stay tuned.

 

Like the Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/MoviePit

New Podcast: Ghost in the Shell “Whitewashing,” Spider-Man: Homecoming, & Much More

A new episode of the podcast is up!

Not only do I talk about the above mentioned news items, I also talk about Baywatch, Emilia Clark leaving Terminator, the recent movie trailer releases, and a hell of a lot more.

 

 

Also, be sure to like the Facebook page to stay up to date on the recent movie news and have a sneak peak at what we’ll talk about on the podcast that week.

https://www.facebook.com/MoviePit

‘Need for Speed’ Review

Dir: Scott Waugh

Cast: Aaron Paul, Dominic Cooper, Imogen Poots, Scott Mescudi, Rami Malek, Ramon Rodriguez, Harrison Gilbertson, Dakota Johnson, and Michael Keaton

Synopsis: Fresh from prison, a street racer who was framed by a wealthy business associate joins a cross country race with revenge in mind. His ex-partner, learning of the plan, places a massive bounty on his head as the race begins.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Need for Speed, based on the popular EA racing games, follows Tobey Marshall (Paul) is a former racing star who’s now struggling to make the payments on the auto shop he inherited from his dad.  When his rival Dino Brewster (Cooper) offers Tobey and his crew 25% of the profits on a restored Mustang and they, of course, take the job.  After the car sells in a way Dino doesn’t like, he wagers with Tobey and Tobey’s friend Pete (Gilbertson) an all-or-nothing race.  Tobey takes the wager and is about to win when a desperate Dino nudges Pete off the road, and kills him.  Tobey gets blamed for the crash and is sent to jail for two years. Once he gets out, he chooses to get revenge on Dino by beating him in the prestigious De Leon race held by Monarch (Keaton), an ex-racer-turned-Internet phenomenon.  The Mustang buyer’s assistant, Julia (Poots), provides the restored car and the two head across country while dodging cops and a bounty put by Dino.

While some will probably say the movie is trying to copy or be like The Fast and The Furious franchise, Need for Speed is kind of its own thing.  The movie does have its comedic moments, one scene in particular with one of Toby’s crew members Finn (Malek), but aside from that the movie is very much grounded. The movie has prided itself on using actual stunts instead with few CGI as possible, does make the car chases a bit more thrilling to watch and gives the movie a bit more creditability at the end. Of course, reviewers look at this as a mistake and some even say that the seriousness of the movie ruins the whole movie entirely. While there are some scenes that do prove that it doesn’t change the experience, well at least for me.

On the acting side, Aaron Paul, of Breaking Bad fame, does what he can with his role as a man looking for revenge but other than that he doesn’t really do anything else.  He does have good chemistry with Poots’ character Julia, who is more than just a pretty face. Toby’s crew include; a pilot, Benny, who keeps an eye of them, and mechanics Joe and Finn. All three of them are the comic relief of the movie and while some of the jokes do feel forced there are some real genuine moments that make you feel like they have been friends for a while.

Dominic Cooper’s villain Dino is nothing more than a cocky former pro-racer who wants things done his way and will do anything he can to get it.  Michael Keaton chews up a bit of the scenes he’s in as Monarch, but I think people will be happy to see him on the big screen again.

But let’s face it, the reason people will watch this movie is for the car sequences.  Like I said before, Need for Speed prided itself on using actual stunts with a touch of CGI, which does make the car chases a bit more thrilling to watch and enjoy. Thankfully, Scott Waugh (Act of Valor) went that direction otherwise the movie could have gone in another direction for the worse. Waugh even brings some descent POV shots and puts you in the car sometimes. Like the game, the races all build up to the last race which is Monarch’s pride-and-joy, the De Leon, where the winner gets millions of dollars and the fancy cars.

All in all, Need for Speed isn’t a great movie but it isn’t as bad as the reviewers want to make you think.  Paul, Poots and Keaton are the better parts of the movie but in reality the car chase sequences are the best part of Need for Speed.

 

Need for Speed

3.5 out of 5

‘Robocop’ Review

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Dir: Jose Padilha

Cast: Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman, Michael Keaton, Abbie Cornish, Jackie Earle Haley, Michael K. Williams, and Samuel L. Jackson

Synopsis:. In 2028 Detroit, when Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) – a loving husband, father and good cop – is critically injured in the line of duty, the multinational conglomerate OmniCorp sees their chance for a part-man, part-robot police officer

 

*Reviewer Note:  This is a spoiler free review, as always.*

 

The original Robocop wowed moviegoers back in 1987 with its heavy blend of hardcore violence, state-of-the-art special effects, and social satire, all wrapped in the hugely entertaining film of a police officer who is fatally wounded in the line-of-duty and reborn “part-man, part machine, all cop.”

Well let’s fast forward, yes forget the sequels and I’m looking more at you Robocop 3.  We have a loose remake that pays the original homage here and there, but does the best it to make the movie stand on its own. It doesn’t take the full satire route that Verhoeven did but instead tries to make its own point about what it means to be a man and or a machine.

Alex Murphy (Kinnaman) is a detective who ends up in critical condition after the arms dealer he’s investigating tries to blow him up. The timing works out for the robotics company Omnicorp, which is run by Raymond Sellars (Keaton), who has been trying to figure out a way to get the American people on board with the idea of robotic law enforcement. Omnicorp has robots policing the entire world, but can’t deploy in America as Americans don’t trust robots to make life or death decisions. They want a human element, or as Sellars puts it “a man inside a machine.” Enter Alex Murphy

The actual man responsible for putting Alex in the suit is Dr. Norton (Oldman).  Norton is convinced by Sellars but unlike Sellars’ lawyer Liz Kline (Jennifer Ehle) and marketing man Tom Pope (Jay Baruchel), Norton knows that this isn’t completely going to work. Norton knows that the human part will always beat the mechanical at the end of the day but all Sellars wants is his cash-cow.  Nevertheless, Norton goes against his better judgment and gives Alex his “life back.”

But where the original movie merely touched on the moral issues of turning a man into a machine before murder and mayhem took center stage, the remake make the issues the prime idea. In fact, unlike the original RoboCop, Kinnaman plays a much larger role. He brings the character of Alex Murphy out more with family, which is another thing the original only touched on briefly. The family situation digs only a little deeper but gets pushed to the side once again for the action sequences and its moral question.

Since I’m talking about Kinnaman, he does a pretty descent job in the lead role. It’s almost hard for me to judge since he does most of his acting with his face. But, there are certain scenes where that’s all he needs and he really makes you feel sorry for him. His best scenes are those shared with the always dependable Gary Oldman, with Dr. Norton the film’s most interesting character, as he wrestles with the consequences of his actions. Michael Keaton’s bad guy is okay, he’s not over the top but not very menacing either. I’d say the best villain is Jackie Earle Haley, whose Maddox – a former soldier now working for OmniCorp – entertains whenever he appears. He really deserved more screen time.

The only real satirical elements to the movie is the news show called The Novak Element, in which Samuel L. Jackson character delivers agenda-heavy monologues that are pro-robot and anti-freedom.  Other more nods to the original are hugely effective, from the music to the taser gun emerging from Robocop’s leg and of course some line from the original.

The action sequences are scattered throughout the movie in order to give the drama center stage. But, when the action sequences kick in they’re highly entertaining to watch. One of my favorites comes at the half way point of the movie when Alex gets a lead on the people that wanted him dead.

Besides its missteps, Robocop suffers from being named Robocop and trying to follow in the footsteps of the original. I know people won’t look over that fact and people will probably be disappointed that it isn’t satirical enough but truth of the matter is, director Jose Padilha isn’t trying to do that. Padilha is trying to make another statement. Verhoeven’s movie worked back then, and for the most part still holds up today, but this version isn’t trying to be that.

All in all, this new version of Robocop works on some levels and fails on others. While some might see it as trying to compete to the original, it is truly trying to make its own point in today’s society. It’s not a great movie but certainly not a bad one.

 

Robocop

3 out of 5