Monthly Rewind for March

Hello, everybody!

The third edition of Monthly Rewind is here, and we’re doing March! (aka my birth month)

I mentioned in the last post that I’m going to change how I did these going forward, and that’s going to happen here. I originally did all the movies I watched that month and gave my reactions to all those movies, good or bad. The new change is that I’ll still be doing that, but this time with only the movies that really left an impression or stood out. I’m not saying I won’t mention the bad movies, but for the most part, it’s going to be the ones that stood out.

If you know something came out during that month, or year, and it’s not on here. It’s a good chance that I haven’t seen it – yes, even after all these years – or I just completely missed it while putting the list together. It’s a lot of movies after all.

Alright, let’s get started with 2010!

 

2010

Mother

The Runaways

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Thoughts: Looking back, it’s hard to believe only three movies stood out to me this month. The first is the Bong Joon Ho-directed crime drama Mother, which followed a mother who desperately searches to clear her son’s name after he’s accused of murdering a girl. It was Joon Ho’s first movie after The Host, and is led wonderfully by Hye-ja Kim as the character of Mother. If you want your Bong Joon Ho fix, search out Mother.

Next up is The Runaways, the biopic about the teenage all-girl rock band The Runaways, led by Cherie Currie (Dakota Fanning) and Joan Jett (Kristen Stewart), and what they went through as the band grew. It was the first thing I knew Stewart in after Twilight blew up, and see her and Fanning together was fun to watch. Granted, I didn’t know too much about that actual Runaways themselves, it was nice to see it play out on screen.

Finally, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. The original Swedish version that blew up overseas and then here in the States, and it also made Noomi Rapace a household name among film nerds. The film, based on the bestselling novel by Stieg Larsson, introduce us to the popular character of Lisbeth Salander and her anti-hero ways of taking down men who take advantage of the system. It was one of the rare movies that shook me and had me buzzing to anyone that would hear me after I watched it.

 

2011

I Saw the Devil

Battle Los Angeles

Sucker Punch

Thoughts: Oh, 2011, what was going on? Let’s start with the Zack Snyder-directed action movie Sucker Punch, which is probably the definition of cool, badass trailer that doesn’t translate into a good movie. It’s also the prime example that Snyder is more of a visual director than a plot/story-driven director since the action scenes were great to watch, but everything else was rather, blah.

Next is Battle Los Angeles, the sci-fi action movie that follows a squad of marines as they fight to an alien invasion in Los Angeles. I’m going to admit that I’m actually a fan of the movie. There’s enough familiar faces in there like Aaron Eckhart, Michelle Rodriguez, Michael Pena and Bridget Moynahan to get to connect, and some somewhat familiar faces to keep you fully invested in the action. The action is also pretty fun, and it gives off a more toned down Black Hawk Dawn with aliens.

Finally, another Korean film, I Saw the Devil directed by Jee-woon Kim (A Tale of Two Sisters, The Good the Bad the Weird, The Last Stand). The movie sees a deadly cat-and-mouse game with a twist. A special agent, played by Byung-hun Lee, tracks down his fiancé’s murderer, a dangerous psychopath played by excellently by the great Choi Min-sik, and deploys his own level of torture. This movie is FUCKED UP. I don’t want to say anymore, but this, go watch this with the information I just gave you, and that’s it!

 

2012

John Carter

Silent House

Casa de mi Padre

The Hunger Games

The Raid: Redemption

Thoughts: Okay, let’s start off with the big one here in John Carter. Disney really dropped the ball on this one. What should have started a franchise for Disney – again – was instead a heavy mix-bag of descent to good CGI and borderline mediocre. It’s a shame since the books were a heavy inspiration of sci-fi and fantasy movies that we all know and love. John Carter is, arguably, one of the biggest “what happened?” movies in Hollywood.

Next is the Elizabeth Olsen-led Silent House. A remake of the film La Casa Muda (The Silent House), the movie is shot like a one-take and follows Olson’s Sarah, who is trapped inside her family’s lakeside retreat by a supernatural force. The movie is okay, mainly held together by Olson, who’s in every scene in the movie, and was only her second film (Martha Marcy May Marlene had gotten a limited release and a film festival run at this point). The movie’s ending also loses every bit of the film’s overall story, which is why people probably, in the end, didn’t enjoy it.

Case de mi Padre was a Spanish comedy starring Will Ferrell (yes, speaking Spanish) where he was trying to save his father’s ranch, with his brother (played by Diego Luna), who ends up going head-to-head with Mexico’s most feared drug lord. The movie is utterly ridiculous, including a “sex scene” that you’d expect out of a Ferrell, but you know what, I remember liking the movie when I saw it.

Next up is The Hunger Games, based off the popular book series by Suzanne Collins (who also co-wrote the script), the movie starred Jennifer Lawrence and basically launched her into super stardom. The movie itself was fine, but it was one of the rare instincts where I doubled-down on the phrase “the book is FAR superior than the movie.”

Finally, The Raid. Directed by Gareth Evans and starring Iko Uwais, the movie took audiences by storm. Everyone called it the best action film is years, and you know what? They were right! The story might be unoriginal – elite SWAT team gets trapped in a building by the bad guy they are trying to take down – difference is, these guys beat the hell out of each other instead of shooting each other up for two hours.

 

2013

Stoker

Spring Breakers

The Croods

Olympus Has Fallen

G.I. Joe: Retaliation

Thoughts: Okay, let’s start off with Spring Breakers, which I will whole heartedly admit, I did NOT like this movie. It didn’t matter how enthralling James Franco was as Alien, this movie felt like it was two-and-half-hours even though it was actually an hour-and-a-half. That should tell you what my experience was like watching.

Let’s move on to Stoker, written by actor Wentworth Miller and directed by Chan-wook Park (Oldboy, Thirst) which followed India (Mia Wasikowska), who finds out she had an uncle (Matthew Goode) she never knew about that comes to live with her and her unstable mother (Nicole Kidman). What follows is a mystery thriller of India trying to figure what her uncle really wants. It was a nice little solid thriller, but the problem was that not many people saw it. It also had an Asian cinema feel to it, which may have set people off too.

Now let’s talk about, a movie that I think gets a little too much hate, G.I. Joe: Retaliation. Yes, Rise of Cobra was pretty much hot garbage, but Retaliation got the Dwayne Johnson push, along with it being a soft reboot. The movie also gave Snake Eyes and Storm Shadow way more to do, including that pretty cool mountain sequence. If you haven’t seen it in a while, give it another shot.

Next is Olympus Has Fallen, one of the two White House invasion movies that came out this year, but I much prefer Olympus Has Fallen mainly due to it going more action-centric and somewhat more serious. It also had Gerard Butler going back to the action genre after doing his romantic comedies stint.

Finally, The Croods. Coming from DreamWorks Animation, and having a voice cast of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Clark Duke, Catherine Keener and Cloris Leachman as the titular family of cave people who must find a new home after theirs is destroyed, and finding help from Guy (Ryan Reynolds). The movie was a lot of fun. I didn’t, admittedly, think the movie was going to be anything impressive, but the humor keeps the movie going from beginning to end.

 

2014

300: Rise of an Empire

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Need for Speed

Jodorowsky’s Dune

Noah

Sabotage

Thoughts: Let’s start off with the documentary Jodorowsky’s Dune, which tells the story of cult film director Alejandro Jodorowsky’s ambitious but ultimately doomed adaptation of Dune. It’s an amazing documentary about how all this work went into that adaptation of Dune, and what carried over to the version we all know.

Let’s now talk about Sabotage. Directed by David Ayer (Fury, Suicide Squad), it followed members of an elite DEA task force who are getting murdered one-by-one after they end up robbing a drug cartel safe house. It was lead by Arnold Schwarzenegger, with a supporting cast of Sam Worthington, Joe Manganiello, Mireille Enos, Max Martini, Terrence Howard, Josh Holloway and Olivia Williams. This is honestly my least-favorite David Ayer film, and probably his worst. The movie is filled with unlikable characters and writing that is all over the place that makes the movie feel like it was a first draft.

Next is the somewhat controversial Darren Aronofsky’s directed Noah. The story of Noah, played by Russell Crowe, as he builds his ark before God’s flood. This story adds an army of people, seemingly lead by Ray Winstone’s Tubal-cain, who want to invade the ark and also save themselves, a group of fallen angels called Watchers who are rock creatures – the leader being voiced by Nick Nolte – and a less benevolent Noah that we’ve come to know. The film itself is okay, but it wasn’t something I’d recommend to everyone.

Moving on to 300: Rise of an Empire, a fourteen-year sequel to 300, takes the other perspective of the Battle of Thermopylae, the naval battle between the Greeks and the Persian army. The movie took the same graphic novel look and applied it to the sea battles which looked pretty cool. It also had a great villain in Artemisia, played by Eva Green.

Next is Need for Speed, based on the video game series, Aaron Paul plays a street racer who was framed for the murder of his friend by his wealthy associate, Dino (Dominic Cooper). When he gets released he joins a secretive and high-stakes race called The DeLeon, knowing Dino will be on the race, he takes part as a way to get revenge and redemption. Honestly, I was pretty surprised by Need for Speed, since I didn’t really expect much from it, but I needed up really doing the hell out of it.

Finally, The Grand Budapest Hotel, directed by Wes Anderson. Maybe not my favorite Anderson film, but a good one nonetheless.

 

 

2015

Chappie

Run All Night

It Follows

Thoughts: Let’s begin with Chappie, the third outing of Neill Blomkamp (District 9, Elysium), which follows a police droid (motion-captured and voiced by Sharlto Copley) that gets stolen and reprogrammed to become the first robot with the ability to think and feel for himself. The movie was held together by Copley’s portray as Chappie, Hugh Jackman’s villain character Vincent, and surprisingly the supporting performance by singers Yo-Landi Visser and Ninja. The movie itself, so-so.

Next is Run All Night, the Liam Neeson-led action crime movie where he plays a mobster hitman, Jimmy Conlon, who needs to keep his son safe for the night when he becomes the target of a hit, placed by his boss and longtime friend Shawn (Ed Harris), after the death of his son. This was Neeson and director Jaume Collet-Sera’s third team up of their four movies together (Unknown, Non-Stop and The Commuter). The movie itself was okay, it wasn’t their best, but maybe their second best with Neeson playing up his age in this one and the on-screen chemistry he has with Harris.

Finally, the much-talked about and analyzed horror hit, It Follows. Written and directed by David Robert Mitchell, the film follows Jay (Maika Monroe, in her breakout role), who is followed by an unknown supernatural force after a sexual encounter, who only she can see. It Follows was one of the breakout horror films, if not just film in general, in 2015 for its themes and overall quality. In that time, a bunch of articles came out trying to break down everything, which from what I can remember, hadn’t happened in a while.

 

 

2016

Zootopia

10 Cloverfield Lane

Midnight Special

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

Everybody Wants Some!!

Thoughts: First up, Midnight Special, the indie sci-fi drama about a father and son on the run from the government and a cult who want to use the child’s powers for their own good. The film had a great cast with Michael Shannon, Joel Edgerton, Adam Driver, Jaeden Martell, Bill Camp, Kirsten Dunst and Sam Shepard, which keeps you invested from beginning to end.

Next is the Richard Linklater’s coming-of-age college film Everybody Wants Some!! Following a group of collage baseball players in the summer before their semester starts. It’s like other Linklater films – expect Boyhood – with a mix of unknown and up-and-comers.

Next is Disney’s Zootopia, which took critics and fans for quite a ride when it came out. Setting it in a city of anthropomorphic animals, a rookie cop bunny teams up with a con artist fox to solve a conspiracy. If anything, it gave us plenty of meme, gif content.

10 Cloverfield Lane, which is arguably the best movie of the month, is set within the Cloverfield universe, at least for the last ten to fifteen minutes. The movie follows Mary Elizabeth Winstead’s Michelle, who wakes up in an underground bunker after a car accident. She finds out the bunker belongs to John Goodman’s Howard, who has also taken in John Gallagher Jr.’s Emmett, and won’t let them leave because of a supposed chemical attack that has turned the air toxic. The movie got an interesting article after it came out relating the movie to domestic abuse, which was an interesting way to look at it. Plus, it has Winstead battling aliens, so yeah.

Okay, finally, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice aka “Why did you say that name?” I’m going off the theatrical version and look, I wanted to like this movie, I really did. I was probably one of the few people that was onboard the Batfleck bandwagon, and the giving Gal Gadot a chance as Wonder Woman. But, oh man what a massive disappointment this was. Like, how do you mess this up? Seriously! The Trinity of DC Comics and you drop the ball heavily. Big no-no.

 

2017

Logan

Kong: Skull Island

The Belko Experiment

Power Rangers

Ghost in the Shell

Thoughts: Oh, Ghost in the Shell, what happened? Let’s move pass the “white washing” controversy (the character is a robot, not to take away the seriousness of the situation, but still), and talk about the movie itself. It was rather bland.

Next is The Belko Experiment, written by James Gunn, the movie takes a twisted social experiment with eighty Americans locked in their high-rise corporate office in Colombia. They are ordered by a mysterious and unknown voice from the intercom system that they must participate in a deadly game of kill or be killed. It’s a pretty descent movie, that can be a little mean sometimes, but given the material, I guess it makes sense.

Let’s talk about Power Rangers, Krispy Kreme aside, this movie would have blown little me’s mind away. Filled with, at the time, a relative unknown cast this reboot wasn’t really that bad. The characters are written well enough, although not all of them had proper time to shine. This movie towed the line at times from cheesy to serious, and it was truly something to hear the theme playing on the big screen again.

Next is Kong: Skull Island, the reboot/remake/reimaging of King Kong, saw a team of scientists along with a group of soldiers, a photojournalist and a personal tracker who venture to an uncharted island, where they encounter massive unknown creatures and Kong himself. I really enjoyed the movie and really liked what they did with Kong, and not trying to copy the original too much. The movie also had a cast of who’s who, and some disgusting imagery that you’d expect. It also opened the door for the new Kong vs. Godzilla movie happening.

Finally, let’s talk about Logan! The R-rated comic book, and the final run of Hugh Jackman’s Logan aka Wolverine. Set in the future, Logan, now a broken down version of his former self is found by Laura (Dafne Keen), a mutant child on the run from scientists and a group of enhanced mercenaries that will stop at nothing to get her back. There’s not a lot to hate or dislike about the movie, and it was one of those movies that took me a minute to process. And that last shot, oh man.

 

 

2018

The Strangers: Prey at Night

Pacific Rim: Uprising

Unsane

Ready Player One

Thoughts: Our last year we’ll start with Pacific Rim: Uprising, the sequel Guillermo del Toro’s great – at least in my opinion – first movie about giants robots, called Jaegers, against giant monsters, Kaiju. The sequel sees the son of Idris Elba’s character from the first movie played by John Boyega. Boyega’s Jake, a former Jaeger pilot gets recruited to the new Jaeger program to fight off a new threat. Del Toro did not return to direct or write, so it did lose the del Toro touch, and while the sequel had some cool moments, it just didn’t feel right. Plus, the ending kind of just happens.

Next let’s talk about the Steven Soderbergh-directed Unsane, which he reportedly shot on an iPhone, which is impressive in itself. The movie followed Claire Foy’s Sawyer who is involuntarily committed to a mental institution, where she is, maybe, confronted by her stalker. The movie plays up the mystery of whether or not it’s real or not, but the real thing here is how Soderbergh was able to pull it off. The movie itself is fine.

The next movie is The Strangers: Prey at Night, the sequel to the first movie from 2008. This time instead of a couple, the sequel follows a family staying at a secluded mobile home park where they are hunted by our three masked psychopaths. The movie is very different from the first movie, mainly since the movie isn’t just isolated to a home, it gives everyone more space to play around. It’s also got a 80s vibe to it, which really made the movie work. I would highly recommend this if you haven’t watched it yet, and you don’t really have to watch the first movie to watch the sequel.

Finally, the ambitious adaptation of Ernest Cline’s novel, Ready Player One, directed by Steven Spielberg. The movie took us into the future and the world of OASIS, a virtual reality where people can be whoever they want to be, and when the creator of the OASIS dies, he leaves behind Easter Eggs. Anyone who finds them, through his series of puzzles, gets completely control of the OASIS, and the creator’s fortune. The movie itself was quite the experience watching on the big screen, mainly because of how chalk-full of references and video game characters are in the book, and how many of them are on the screen at the same time.

It’s rather impressive that Spielberg was able to get all of this together, and more importantly, get it to really work for the majority of the film. Especially considering how much they changed from the book to the movie, mainly the sequence paying homage to The Shining.

 

And that’s it everyone. Admittedly, this was still a lot movies, but I can’t help that enjoy a lot of movies more than others. But more importantly, I want to know what you guys think about this. Let me know what your favorite movies in February were?

Frustrating, Undecided and Disappointments/Least-Liked Movies of 2019

It’s the end of the year boys and girls, you know what that means? It’s list time!

I’ll put up my list of “Favorite Movies of the Year” later, but with all those good/great/awesome movies I have seen, I had to sit through some stinkers unfortunately. Some of these I knew weren’t going to be any good walking in, but I ended up taking the hit anyway. The list ranges all over the place, so don’t think I’m attacking certain movies because it’s easy. I walk into every movie with a clear mind and soaking up the movie for what it’s worth.

The list will have the movies in alphabetical order, just to be fair, and because I really don’t want to go through the trouble anymore of picking a number one because they weren’t good enough to make it on my other list.

Like all lists, this is my opinion! So if you don’t agree that’s perfectly fine and probably justified. Film is subjective, and that’s why I love it. Finally, there are other movies that could have gone on the list, but these are the ones that truly stuck out.

But first, let’s talk about the movies I didn’t know where to put, or as I like to call it – The Undecided

 

The Undecided Movies of the Year

Ad Astra

One of the challenges Ad Astra faced was marketing. The trailers and TV spots – even a TV spot I saw recently – are treating the film as a sci-fi space action thriller. The thing is director James Gray (Lost City of Z) isn’t that kind of director, and the film was much more of a personal film about Brad Pitt’s character trying to find his father (played by Tommy Lee Jones), but his character is so mission focused that he find it hard to connect with everyone. It’s a quiet film, but effective with Pitt’s performance.

 

Joker

Joker is, arguably, the most talked about movie of the year, for the good, bad and all the articles it sparked. Regardless of that, Joaquin Phoenix did deliver a rather haunting performance as Arthur Fleck, but there is just something about this film’s theme and message that gets lost in its delivery.

 

Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood

Quentin Tarantino’s ninth film, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood made A LOT of waves when it came out. Moving most of that aside for right now, what made the movie worth every penny was watching Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt playing off each other, or even stealing the show on their own as aging cowboy actor Rick Dalton and his stuntman, Cliff Booth. At the end of the day though, I can’t see myself putting it in my favorites or honorable mentions. I didn’t dislike or thought the film was bad, I’m kind of indifferent to it.

 

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Based on the popular book series, I was fully looking forward to Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, and not just because of the books, but the crew behind the camera. Guillermo del Toro produced the movie – he was originally attached to direct for a while – while Andre Ovredal (The Autopsy of Jane Doe) directed the movie. The movie was fine, but there was a certain punch missing from it.

 

The Lighthouse

If you saw the movie, you know why it’s here. Seriously, I still don’t know whether I enjoyed the movie, or have this need to enjoy the movie. Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe are great in it – I prefer Dafoe here – but man, The Lighthouse was something.

 

The Irishman

Martin Scorsese’s latest film made, no surprise, waves amongst film fans and critics. The “long” film about Mob hitman Frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro), and the role he may have had in the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino). I honestly can say I enjoyed watching the movie, and watching the performances of De Niro, Pacino and the returning Joe Pesci, but then there are very minor things that a director like Scorsese should have known better about – I’m looking at you Anna Paquin.

 

 

Frustrating Movies of the Year

Brightburn

What would happen if Superman came to Earth and was actually evil? But, he’s not actually Superman because of comic rights? That’s what Brightburn basically was, and while concept wise it worked, execution wise, well, that’s another story. While the performances of the main trio – Jackson A. Dunn, David Denman and Elizabeth Banks – made the movie worthwhile, Brightburn suffered from not really going all-out like it did. Granted, there are places the movie DID go that was surprising.

 

Escape Room

Escape Room followed a group of strangers, who take a mysterious invitation to be a part of an immersive escape room, where the winner gets a cash prize – although the trailer dubs in a larger amount than in the movie. Of course, things are much more than they appear to be.

I’ll be honest, I wasn’t really looking forward to Escape Room, but considering it came out at the beginning of the year, and the amount of new movies coming out is very slim, I went and boy was I impressed!

The movie and cast were very solid, and right as I was about to eat my words, the ending happened.

Escape Room lost every bit of steam it had built up with its terrible ending that really served no purpose other than set up a sequel, which is happening and set to come out this year. Now before you say, some other movies set up sequels, it couldn’t have been that bad? Yes, yes it was.

Sometimes the less you show, and the mystery, is much better than the explanation you give. I’d still highly recommend Escape Room, just turn it off five minutes before the credits roll.

 

Glass

After years of wanting a sequel to Unbreakable, we finally got one in the form of Spilt and after feeling the high that was the return of M. Night Shyamalan, we got Glass. It’s not the say that Glass was a bad movie, because it some respect it wasn’t. Glass followed our three already introduced trio in James McAvoy’s Kevin Wendell Crumb and his multiple personalities, Bruce Willis’ David Dunn and Samuel L. Jackson’s Elijah aka Mr. Glass. All three have been captured and locked away to “treat them” of their illness, which is they believe they’re real-life superheroes by the mysterious Dr. Ellie Staple played by Sarah Paulson.

For its credit, Glass does try to get the message across that these three created their own reality that their superheroes, and Paulson gives an unflinching performance to boot. The problem with Glass is it falls into the pitfalls that put Shyamalan out of favor with fans in the first place – the twists. Now, sure, most fans at the beginning loved the Shyamalan twist, but eventually they became the butt of many jokes.

The problem with the Glass is that has one too many twists in it, and one in particular that comes from out of nowhere and feels like it was a last minute thing that Shyamalan put in there to have fans talking about that rather than what he did to his characters that we’ve come to love.

Glass could arguably be the most frustrating movie of the year, I know it is for me, since just about everyone – okay, maybe not everyone – was hyped to see Shyamalan come back to form.

 

The Kitchen

Based on the comic book series of the same name, The Kitchen followed the wives of New York gangsters in Hell’s Kitchen in the 70s, played by Melissa McCarthy, Elisabeth Moss and Tiffany Haddish, who continue to operate their husbands’ rackets after they’re locked up in prison, and making themselves highly successful in the process. With a set up like that, and three always reliable leads, how the hell did this become such a mess!?

McCarthy, Haddish and Moss do the best with what they’re given, and this is their show, but why bother getting some big names for s supporting cast just to waste them. Domhnall Gleeson, James Badge Dale, Bill Camp, Common and Margo Martindale are in the movie, but not really. It’s a tonal whiplash at times, the editing is off, it’s a bit anti-climatic at one point and its ending is undeserved because it just comes out of left field with no real development.

 

Alright, now let’s get this over with.

Dishonorable Mentions

Anna

Child’s Play

Miss Bala

Polaroid

The Dead Don’t Die

Men in Black: International

 

Disappointments & Least-Liked Movies of the Year

Black Christmas

The second remake of the classic horror film, now with a modern twist, Black Christmas follows a group of sorority sisters who are being hunted by down a mysterious group at their college campus. While I appreciated that the movie tried to make the remake its own thing, nothing really happens until the last act of the movie, and even then – with a twist as well, mind you – it was a little too fumbled to really appreciate it.

 

Close

Close seemed to be Netflix’s potential answer to the Bourne franchise, but unfortunately for Noomi Rapace – who probably does deserve another franchise – she wasn’t given enough to put this movie over the top. The movie follows Rapace’s Sam, a bodyguard for hire, and when she’s hired to protect Sarah (Olivia Jewson) the daughter of a business tycoon who just died, she’s put into the crosshairs of corporate espionage. The action thriller has little action and the majority of it feels uninspired, and on top of that the movie trudges along to its finale that just comes out of nowhere with no real, or at the minimal lazy, build-up.

 

Dark Phoenix

The last X-Men movie in the Fox run, Dark Phoenix unfortunately whiffed it on their way out. The Dark Phoenix story arc is, arguably, one of the best X-Men comic arcs in history, so it was always bound for a big-screen adaptation. Of course, the first time we got the big-screen story was X-Men: The Last Stand – there are some cool moments in the movie, let’s not shit on the movie entirely okay. Then the franchise got rebooted, and after the tease of X-Men: Apocalypse – which Dark Phoenix seemed to completely ignore – we knew we were in for another take of the story.

Unfortunately, Dark Phoenix suffers from just more than some bad writing. The movie did have some problems behind-the-scenes, and then had some last-minute third act reshoots that changed a lot. It was also well known that Jennifer Lawrence wanted out of the franchise, and only came back because James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender came back…and you can clearly see she DID NOT want to be there – seriously, I’ve never seen someone so uninterested in being at work.

The biggest complaint I have about Dark Phoenix is that it’s just kind of bland. The action is a tad uninspired, and while the final train sequence was actually kind of cool, since it has the X-Men, Magneto and two other mutants who we met thirty seconds ago teaming up, the rest of it just happens.

 

Replicas  

Replicas follows Keanu Reeves’ Will Foster who is at the brink of a scientific breakthrough, however, when his family dies in a tragic car accident she decides to tweak his breakthrough and bring his family back through cloning. Of course, things don’t go as smoothly as he thinks.

Replicas had a ton of potential, the problem is the movie was not only pushed back on multiple occasions, it barely got any real promotion and overall it failed to really grasp its own concept and ruin everything it had built up. The movie also feels just a tad bit cheap, which doesn’t help the cause, and the third act is a little too wonky for its good.

Then there’s the ending…again.

 

All right, so there are my disappointments, least-liked films of the year. What were some of yours?

My Best/Favorite Action Sequences, Scores/Soundtracks, Trailers & More

This is a continuation of my Favorite/Standouts of the Year, this time focusing more on the genre side of things with my favorite fights/action sequences, cinematography, score/soundtrack, and trailers.

 

Fight/Action Sequence

Avengers: Infinity War – Iron Man, Spider-Man, Doctor Strange, Star-Lord, Drax & Mantis vs. Thanos & Wakanda Battle

Incredibles 2 – Elastigirl Chases the Train & Jack-Jack vs. Raccoon

Mission: Impossible – Fallout – Ethan and Walker vs. Lark Decoy, Paris Escapes & Helicopter Chase

The Night Comes for Us – Bobby and Fatih vs. Arian’s Men, The Operator vs. Elena & Ito vs. Arian

 

Honorable Mention

Avengers: Infinity War – Hulk vs. Thanos

Overlord – Opening

Avengers: Infinity War – Iron Man vs. Thanos

Black Panther – South Korea Chase

Ready Player One – Race to the First Key & Final Battle

The Strangers: Prey at Night – Luke vs. Man in the Mask

Jailbreak – Jean-Paul, Tharoth, Dara, Sucheat and Vuthy (guard) vs. Gecko inmates

 

Just Missed the List

Mile 22 – Li Noor vs. Hospital Assassins

Upgrade – Grey vs. Fisk

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse – Finale & Miles Runs from The Prowler

Aquaman – Arthur vs. Manta (Italy) & Mera Runs

Tomb Raider – Fox Run

Sicario: Day of the Soldado – Convey Ambush

 

 

MISC.

Mark Tildeley – Phantom Thread (Production Design)

Pawel Pogorzelski (Cinematography) & Grace Yun – Hereditary (Production Design)

Linus Sandgren – First Man (Cinematography)

Animation Department – Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Alfonso Cuaron – Roma (Cinematography)

 

Honorable Mentions

Robbie Ryan – The Favourite (Cinematography)

Rob Hardy – Mission: Impossible – Fallout (Cinematography)

Seamus McGarvey – Bad Times at the El Royale (Cinematography)

Nicholas D. Johnson and Will Merrick – Searching (Film Editing)

Hannah Beachler – Black Panther (Production Design)

 

Just Missed the List

Ready Player One (Visual Effects)

Ryan Samul – The Strangers: Prey at Night (Cinematography)

Sayombhu Mukdeeprom – Suspiria (Cinematography)

Nelson Coates – Crazy Rich Asians (Production Design)

Sound Department – Overlord

 

 

Score/Soundtrack

Ludwig Goransson – Black Panther

Hildur Guonadottir – Sicario 2: Soldado

Keegan DeWitt – Hearts Beat Loud

John Carpenter, Cody Carpenter and Daniel A. Davies – Halloween

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Soundtrack

 

Honorable Mentions

A Star Is Born Soundtrack

Alexandre Desplat – Isle of Dogs

Johann Johannsson – Mandy

Nicholas Britell – If Beale Street Could Talk

Crazy Rich Asians Soundtrack

Roddy Hart and Tommy Reilly – Anna and the Apocalypse

 

Just Missed the List

Daniel Pemberton – Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (Score)

Jonny Greenwood – Phantom Thread

Michael Giacchino – Incredibles 2

Lorne Balfe – Mission: Impossible – Fallout

 

 

Trailers

Mission: Impossible – Fallout – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wb49-oV0F78

Avengers: Infinity War – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwievZ1Tx-8

Mission: Impossible – Fallout #2 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiHiW4N7-bo

Avengers: Endgame Trailer – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA6hldpSTF8

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4Hbz2jLxvQ

Ant-Man and the Wasp #2 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUkn-enk2RU

Us – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNCmb-4oXJA

 

Honorable Mentions

Halloween – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ek1ePFp-nBI

Godzilla: King of the Monsters – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVDtmouV9kM

Blindspotting – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9-HBqVbtTo&t=6s

Bumblee #2 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcwmDAYt22k

Detective Pikachu – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1roy4o4tqQM

Hellboy – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dt5g5_1cKVk

Godzilla: King of the Monsters – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDnKuFtdc7A

Upgrade (Red Band) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hTLGlgZ4Z8

Bad Times at the El Royale – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQmOaJciI7Q

 

Just Missed the List

Pacific Rim Uprising #2 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BAhwgjMvnM

BrightBurn – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6eB0JT1DI4&t=6s

Bohemian Rhapsody – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S9c5nnDd_s

Sorry to Bother You – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enH3xA4mYcY

Hereditary  – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6wWKNij_1M