August Movie Releases

Can you believe it’s already August? Seriously, where has the all the time gone, geez. Anyway, August is filled some films that could have potential. It’s also the last month of the Summer Movie Season, also known to some as studios’ “dump month,” especially toward the latter half of the month because the kids are going back to school. Let’s hope that it is not the true case.

 

3rd

Limited Release: The Miseducation of Cameron Post

Based on the novel by Emily M. Danforth, in 1993 a teenage girl is forced into a gay conversion therapy center by her conservative guardians. The movie has been making some waves on the film festival circuit. The Miseducation of Cameron Post stars Chloe Grace Moretz, Sasha Lane, Forrest Goodluck, Marin Ireland, Quinn Shephard, John Gallagher Jr. and Jennifer Ehle.

 

The Darkest Minds

Based on the novel by Alexandra Bracken; imprisoned by an adult world that now fears everyone under 18, a group of teens form a resistance group to fight back and reclaim control of their future. The Darkest Minds stars Amandla Stenberg, Harris Dickinson, Skylan Brooks, Gwendoline Christie and Mandy Moore.

 

Disney’s Christopher Robin

A working-class family man, Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor), encounters his childhood friend Winnie-the-Pooh (voiced by Jim Cummings), who helps him to rediscover the joys of life. The voice casts includes Brad Garrett, Chris O’Dowd, Nick Mohammed, Sophie Okonedo, Toby Jones and Peter Capaldi. The live-action cast includes Mark Gatiss and Hayley Atwell.

 

The Spy Who Dumped Me

Audrey (Mila Kunis) and Morgan (Kate McKinnon) are best friends who unwittingly become entangled in an international conspiracy when Audrey discovers the boyfriend (Justin Theroux) who dumped her was actually a spy. The movie also stars Sam Heughan and Gillian Anderson.

 

 

8th

Dog Days

A group of interconnected people in Los Angeles who are brought together by their loveable canine counterparts. Dog Days stars Eva Longoria, Vanessa Hudgens, Nina Dobrev, Thomas Lennon, Finn Wolfhard, Laruen Lapkus, Adam Pally, Jon Bass and Rob Corddry.

 

10th

BlacKkKlansman

Directed and co-written by Spike Lee, and produced by Jordan Peele, the film based on a true story follows Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), an African-American police officer from Colorado, who successfully managed to infiltrate the local Ku Klux Klan and became the head of the local chapter. The film stars Adam Driver, Topher Grace, Corey Hawkins, Ryan Eggold and Laura Harrier.

 

The Meg

Based on a novel by Steve Alten, after escaping an attack by what he claims was by a 70-foot shark, Jonas Taylor (Jason Statham) must confront his fears to save those trapped in a sunken submersible. The Meg also stars Rainn Wilson, Ruby Rose, Cliff Curtis, Bingbing Li, Masi Oka, Jessica McNamee and Robert Taylor.

 

Slender Man

The story of a tall, thin, horrifying figure with unnaturally long arms and a featureless face, who is reputed to be responsible for the haunting and disappearance of countless children and teens. Slender Man stars Julia Goldani Telles, Joey King, Annalise Basso, Jaz Sinclair, Kallie Tabor, Kevin Chapman and Javier Botet.

 

15th

Crazy Rich Asians

Based on the novel by Kevin Kwan, the story follows Rachel Chu (Constance Wu), an American-born Chinese economics professor, who travels to her boyfriend Nick’s (Henry Golding) hometown of Singapore for his best friend’s wedding. Before long, his secret is out: Nick is from a family that is impossibly wealthy, he’s perhaps the most eligible bachelor in Asia, and every single woman in his ultra-rarefied social class is incredibly jealous of Rachel and wants to bring her down. Crazy Rich Asians also stars Harry Shum Jr., Gemma Chan, Awkwafina, Jimmy O. Yang, Ken Jeong and Michelle Yeoh.

 

 

17th

Alpha

Directed by Albert Hughes (From Hell, The Book of Eli), a story of survival set 20,000 years ago during the last Ice Age, which follows Keda (Kodi Smit-McPhee), who is presumed dead by his tribe after a hunting accident. He must survive the elements of the wild, along with a wolf he befriends, to find his tribe.

 

Mile 22

Directed by Peter Berg, an elite American intelligence officer, aided by a top-secret tactical command unit, tries to smuggle a mysterious police officer with sensitive information out of the country. Mile 22 stars Mark Wahlberg, Iko Uwais, Ronda Rousey, Lauren Cohan and John Malkovich.

 

 

24th

Limited Release: Papillon

A remake of the 1973, and based off the autobiographical book by Henri Charriere, a prisoner detained on a remote island plots his escape. The film stars Charlie Hunnam, Rami Malek, Eve Hewson, Roland Moller and Tommy Flanagan.

 

A.X.L

The life of a teenage boy is forever altered by a chance encounter with cutting edge military technology. The movie stars Alex Neustaedter, Chloe Bridges, Becky G and the voice of Lucy Hale.

 

The Happytime Murders

Directed by Brian Henson, when the puppet cast of an ‘80s children’s TV show begins to get murdered one by one, a disgraced LAPD detective-turned-private eye puppet takes on the case. The film stars Melissa McCarthy, Elizabeth Banks, Joel McHale, Leslie David Baker, Jimmy O. Yang and Maya Rudolph.

 

Searching

After his 16-year-old daughter goes missing, a desperate father breaks into her laptop to look for clues to find her. A thriller that unfolds entirely on computer screens. Searching stars John Cho, Michelle La, Joseph Lee and Debra Messing.

 

31st

Limited Release: The Little Stranger

Based on the novel by Sarah Waters, Dr. Faraday, the son of a housemaid, who has built a life of quiet respectability as a country doctor, is called to attend a patient at Hundreds Hall – where his mother once worked. While there he discovers the family who now owns the land is haunted by something more ominous than a dying way of life. The film stars Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson, Will Poulter, Kate Phillips and Charlotte Rampling.

 

Kin

Based on the short film “Bag Man,” and directed by the directors of that film Jonathan and Josh Baker, an ex-convict and his brother are forced on the run by a vengeful criminal. Kin stars James Franco, Jack Reynor, Zoe Kravitz, Carrie Coon and Dennis Quaid.

 

So, what are you looking forward to?

Advertisements

‘Mission: Impossible – Fallout’ Review

Director: Christopher McQuarrie

Writer: Christopher McQuarrie

Cast: Tom Cruise, Henry Cavill, Simon Pegg, Ving Rhames, Rebecca Ferguson, Vanessa Kirby, Sean Harris, Michelle Monaghan, Alec Baldwin and Angela Bassett

Synopsis: Ethan Hunt and his IMF team, along with some familiar allies, race against time after a mission gone wrong.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Mission: Impossible is arguably one of the best action franchises still around. The franchise has come a long way since the first film back in 1996, and since J.J. Abrams brought back the franchise in 2006, they keep getting better and better with every sequel. However, director Christopher McQuarrie has definitely put his stamp on the franchise, especially since he’s the only director to back came to direct a sequel. So where does Fallout stand in the franchise? Pretty high up there, to be honest.

Mission: Impossible – Fallout follows Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise), and his team of Benji (Simon Pegg) and Luther (Ving Rhames), as they track down a dangerous new organization called The Apostles, a spinoff if you will, of the criminal organization The Syndicate from Rogue Nation. The group is run by mysterious and unknown John Lark, who is after plutonium cores to set off bombs around the globe. After a botched attempt to get them before Lark, the CIA’s Erica Sloan (Angela Bassett) forces Ethan and the IMF to have bring along August Walker (Henry Cavill) to insure they finally get the plutonium and Lark. Of course, all of that is easier said than done, especially when Ilsa (Rebecca Ferguson) and Solomon Lane (Sean Harris) reenter the picture.

I’m not going to lie, I really, really liked this movie. Fallout is thrilling from beginning to end, and doesn’t really ever let the reigns go for anything. The characters, which have all primarily been in the series before work well together. You believe that Ethan, Luther and Benji care for one another and would do anything to protect each other, while also trying to successfully complete their mission. Ferguson’s Ilsa, even though this is her second film – a rare feat for female characters in the series – also feels right at home when she shows up. These are characters we’ve seen and care about, so when certain things are set into motion, or even when they’re picking on one another, we get an emotion out of it.

I don’t want to take a jab at another long-running franchise – Fast & Furious – but Fallout knows who their characters are, and isn’t afraid to have them outshine one another every now and then. Even though Cruise’s Ethan is the lead, everybody has their moment, and it’s awesome to see them take the reins and roll with it.

When it comes to the new characters, more particularly, Henry Cavill’s Walker, he is the perfect opposite of Cruise’s Ethan. Ethan would rather take care of something as smoothly and hazard-free as possible, Walker will just straight-up walk up to the situation, get his hands dirty and deal with the consequences later. It’s also nice to see them play off with each other, and it’s even more apparent during one of the many standout sequences in the HALO jump.

Mission: Impossible is known now for their big set pieces, and Fallout is no different. While the HALO jump is cool to see – looks great in IMAX – there are two chase scenes in Paris that had me on the edge of my seat, and that’s all I’ll say that about. That said, the series has made itself proud of doing a lot of their stunts and action sequences with no to little CGI, which is maybe one reason why fans appreciate these films – as they should. That’s the case here, and while it looks like they used some CGI in little parts here and there, Fallout is probably the most daring for stunts, especially knowing that Tom Cruise broke his ankle during one of the stunts – which they actually ended up using in the film.

As much as I really liked the movie, there are some things that just kind of didn’t work for me. For one, and this is something I can’t believe I’m saying, Fallout is a just a tad bit too long. Fallout is the longest of the Mission: Impossible films and you can clearly feel it before the third act gets going. Cast wise, Angela Bassett’s Erica Sloan is kind of wasted here, even though her character doesn’t necessarily call for her to be in the film a lot, having someone like Bassett play the role, and having her disappear for most of the film was odd. Sean Harris’ Solomon Lane isn’t as compelling as he was in Rogue Nation, but he’s also now the only villain to appear in two Mission: Impossible films. Lastly, and this is something I didn’t mind, but others probably will, Fallout relies a little bit too much on small twists.

All in all, Mission: Impossible – Fallout is one of the best experiences you’ll have in theaters this summer. It’s got great action, the cast is spot on, the score is also damn great and it’s thrilling from beginning to end. I can’t say enough good things about Fallout. The fact that Mission: Impossible has had the staying power and continues to get better with every installment is amazing and hard to believe, but somehow they keep doing it, and I’m all for it.

Mission: Impossible – Fallout

5 out of 5

‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ Review

Director: Peyton Reed

Writers: Chris McKenna, Erik Sommers, Andrew Barrer, Gabriel Ferrari and Paul Rudd

Cast: Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lilly, Michael Pena, Hannah John-Kamen, Walton Goggins, Randall Park, David Dastmalchian, Tip ‘T.I.’ Harris, Judy Greer, Bobby Cannavale, Abby Ryder Fortson, Laurence Fishburne, Michael Douglas and Michelle Pfeiffer

Synopsis: As Scott Lang balances being both a Super Hero and a father, Hope van Dyne and Dr. Hank Pym present an urgent new mission that finds the Ant-Man fighting alongside The Wasp to uncover secrets from their past.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review. There is also a mid-credit and post-credit scene.*

 

The twentieth movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Ant-Man and the Wasp, is a nice change of pace from the shattering conclusion of Avengers: Infinity War. The sequel not only doesn’t take itself too seriously, it’s a low stakes movie that is a hell of a lot of fun.

The movie follows Scott Lang/Ant-Man (Paul Rudd), who has been on house arrest for two years after the events of Captain America: Civil War. He’s also been cut off by Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly) and Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) after going off to fight without telling them. The daughter-father duo are also trying to find Hope’s mother Janet van Dyne (Michelle Pfeiffer) and bring her back from the Quantum Realm, which is realized more after an incident with Scott.

What follows is Hope and Hank getting Scott to help them get Janet out, but also dealing with the mysterious Ghost (Hannah John-Kamen), who tries to steal a vital piece of technology, and a black market businessman Sonny Burch (Walton Goggins) trying to profit off Pym’s technology.

Ant-Man and the Wasp is a bit all over the place. We have the main plot which is trying to rescue Janet from the Quantum Realm, which is connected to Ghost’s arc and Burch. We have Scott’s story of almost ending his house arrest, with pesky FBI agent Jimmy Woo (Randall Park), and trying to still prove he can be a good dad to his adorable daughter Cassie (Abby Ryder Fortson). Then you have random high jinks with some sight gags or Luis (Michael Pena) doing what made him so popular in the first movie.

Everyone is also on the top of their game here. Paul Rudd continues to bring his trademark charisma and excellent timing. Evangeline Lilly thankfully has a lot more to do here, and seeing her play The Wasp is a ton of fun to watch. Also, watching her and Michael Douglas’ Hank Pym trying to rescue Janet leads to one of the more emotional moments – there are quite a few – of the movie. Pena’s Luis is once again a scene-stealer, but he has some competition in Abby Ryder-Fortson’s Cassie.

We then have the new cast members starring with villain Sonny Burch, played by the always reliable Walton Goggins. The character could have easily been one-note, but Goggins just adds something to the character. Ghost played by Hannah John-Kamen does have a more rounded out story than you would think, and she’s played excellently by John-Kamen (who plays one of the leads in the SYFY channel show Killjoys, which I highly recommend). Randall Park has a small role as Agent Woo, but he plays it up with Rudd, and the two have great chemistry.

Finally, the two big additions to the MCU are Dr. Bill Foster, played by Laurence Fishburne, who hopefully we get to see more of, because he doesn’t get too much to do here, but it’s a nice addition for comic book fans. Then we have Michelle Pfeiffer has Janet Van Dyne aka the original Wasp, who sadly isn’t in the movie a lot, even though she plays an important part to the story. Regardless of that, her scenes are where most of the emotional core comes from, and the scenes she does have were great to watch.

All in all, Ant-Man and the Wasp is a hell of a lot of fun, and thoroughly enjoyable from beginning to end. It’s a more self-contained story, even though the events of Civil War are brought up, which helps the movie and the audience breathe a little bit. The action is beefed up, and cast is on top of their game. If you want to have a fun time at the theater, Ant-Man and the Wasp is your movie.

Ant-Man and the Wasp

4.5 out of 5

July Movie Releases

Hello!

It’s July everybody! The Summer Movie Season is almost over, but it’s not going down without a fight. July has some great movies coming out, especially some anticipated movies for some. I’d also want to apologize for putting this up late. I started a new job and it’s completely messed up my schedule for everything (you may have notice there’s been no podcast for a few weeks now). So let’s get to it.

 

4th

The First Purge

Written by series creator James DeMonaco, the prequel will focus on the lead up and show the very first Purge event. The Purge movies started out as a small-scale house invasion thriller that had the potential for open-world sequels. Thankfully, that’s what we got and now after three movies, DeMonaco is finally giving us the prequel he’s talked since The Purge: Anarchy. The movies have also always had a political theme to them – at least in some way – and The First Purge looks to fully be embracing that which could be good. The First Purge stars Y’Ian Noel, Luna Lauren Velez, Lex Scott Davis, Melonie Diaz and Marisa Tomei.

 

6th

Sorry to Bother You

In an alternate present-day version of Oakland, telemarketer Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield) discovers a magical key to professional success, propelling him into a macabre universe. As soon as I saw this trailer I was immediately hooked. What’s better, is I don’t know how this movie will turn out in the end, and that’s what has me excited. Sorry to Bother You also stars Tessa Thompson, Armie Hammer, Jermaine Fowler, Omari Hardwick, David Cross, Patton Oswalt, Steven Yeun, Terry Crews and Danny Glover.

 

Ant-Man and the Wasp

As Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) balances being both a Super Hero and a father, Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly) and Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) present an urgent new mission that finds the Ant-Man fighting alongside The Wasp to uncover secrets from their past. After what happened in Avengers: Infinity War I think we need a good balance of a comedy with Ant-Man, and now we have the long awaited introduction of The Wasp on the big screen. What’s not to be excited about? The sequel co-stars Michael Pena, Laurence Fishburne, Hannah John-Kamen, Randall Park, David Dastmalchian, T.I., Judy Greer, Walton Goggins and Michelle Pfeiffer.

 

13th

Limited Release: Don’t Worry He Won’t Get Far on Foot

A biography about John Callahan. On the rocky path to sobriety after a life-changing accident, John Callahan discovers the healing power of art, willing his injured hands into drawing hilarious, often controversial cartoons, which bring him a new lease on life. The rest of the cast includes Jonah Hill, Rooney Mara, Jack Black, Carrie Brownstein and Udo Kier.

 

Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation

Mavis (Selena Gomez) surprises Dracula (Adam Sandler) with a family voyage on a luxury Monster Cruise Ship so he can take a vacation from providing everyone else’s vacation at the hotel. Once there, romance arises as Dracula meets the ship’s captain, Ericka (Kathryn Hahn). Little do they know, Ericka is a descendant of Dracula’s ancient nemesis, Abraham Van Helsing. The rest of the voice cast includes Kevin James, Steve Buscemi, David Spade, Fran Drescher, Keegan-Michael Key, Molly Shannon, Andy Samberg and Mel Brooks.

 

Skyscraper

FBI Hostage Rescue Team leader and U.S. war veteran Will Ford (Dwayne Johnson), who now assesses security for skyscrapers. On assignment in Hong Kong he finds the tallest, safest building in the world suddenly ablaze, and he’s been framed for it. A wanted man on the run, Will must find those responsible, clear his name and somehow rescue his family who is trapped inside the building. As much as I love Dwayne Johnson on the big screen being our modern day action hero, Skyscraper’s trailers have been rather mixed. I’m sure the movie will be entertaining as hell, but the trailers just aren’t selling it for me right away. The cast includes Neve Campbell, Pablo Schreiber, Roland Moller, Byron Mann and Chin Han.

 

 

20th

Limited Release: Blindspotting

A timely story about the intersection of race and class, set against the backdrop of a rapidly gentrifying Oakland. The film stars Daveed Diggs, Rafael Casal, Janina Gavankar, Jasmine Cephas Jones and Tisha Campbell-Martin.

 

Unfriended: Dark Web

A teen comes into possession of a new laptop and soon discovers that the previous owner is not only watching him, but will also do anything to get it back. I never saw the first movie, merely because it didn’t look that great, but the sequel  looks to be upping the ante a bit on the concept. The movie stars Getty Gabriel, Rebecca Rittenhouse, Chelsea Alden, Colin Woodell, Stephanie Nogueras, Andrew Lees and Douglas Tait.

 

Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again

The sequel follows Donna’s (played by Meryl Streep and Lily James) young life, experiencing the fun she had with the three possible Dad’s of Sophie (Amanda Seyfried). Sophie is now pregnant. Like Donna, she will be young when she has her baby. This is where she realizes she will need to take risks like her mother did. The cast includes Dominic Cooper, Christine Baranski, Julie Walters, Andy Garcia, Pierce Brosnan, Stellan Skarsgard, Colin Firth and Cher.

 

The Equalizer 2

Robert McCall (Denzel Washington) serves an unflinching justice for the exploited and oppressed, but how far will he go when that is someone he loves? The Equalizer was one of my surprises of 2014, and seeing Washington and director Antoine Fuqua reunite was great. Now, we have another reunion between the two, but also the first sequel for both men, and it looks like they’re upping the ante in both story – making it personal – and action, which going off the first film’s final act, it should be good. Cast also includes Pedro Pascal, Sakina Jaffrey, Bill Pullman and Melissa Leo.

 

27th

Limited Release: Hot Summer Nights

A boy comes of age during a summer he spends in Cape Cod. This was filmed before Chalamet became a household name after Call Me By Your Name, so I’m sure the studio is hoping that will sell the movie. The film stars Timothee Chalamet, Maika Monroe, Jack Kesy, Alex Roe, Emory Cohen, Maia Mitchell, William Fichtner and Thomas Jane.

 

Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

The Teen Titans are determined to get their own superhero movie, so Robin and the others try to get noticed by Hollywood’s hottest director. Certain they can pull it off, their dreams are sidetracked when a super villain tries to take over world. The voice cast includes Tara Strong, Khary Payton, Greg Cipes, Scott Menville, Hynden Walch, Kristen Bell, Lil Yachty, Halsey, James Corden, Will Arnett and Nicolas Cage.

 

Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Written and directed by Christopher McQuarrie, once again, Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his IMF team, along with some familiar allies, race against time after a mission gone wrong. I don’t know how the Mission: Impossible movies do it. They keep getting better with each installment AND they keep looking great in the trailers, so hell yes I am excited for this. Fallout co-stars Rebecca Ferguson, Simon Pegg, Henry Caavill, Alec Baldwin, Ving Rhames, Sean Harris, Vanessa Kirby, Michelle Monaghan and Angela Bassett.

 

What are you looking forward to?

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Review

Director: Stefano Sollima

Writer: Taylor Sheridan

Cast: Josh Brolin, Benicio Del Toro, Isabela Moner, Jeffrey Donovan, Elijah Rodriguez, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo, Catherine Keener and Matthew Modine

Synopsis: The drug war on the US-Mexico border has escalated as the cartels have begun trafficking terrorists across the US border. To fight the war, federal agent Matt Graver re-teams with the mercurial Alejandro.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

I was fortunate enough to get to watch Sicario: Day of the Soldado – it was still called Sicario 2: Soldado at the time – all the way back in February of this year, but had to sit on my thoughts because of an NDA (Non-Disclosure Agreement). Now, the movie’s out and I can finally release this review. The review will be a combination of my first thoughts watching the movie, and my re-watch from this weekend. So, that said, let’s get to it.

Day of the Soldado opens by letting us know that the cartels make big business by trafficking people, and have now moved to terrorists. After a horrifying scene at a department store, the government has put the drug cartels on their list of dangerous threats. They call on someone with some experience in the field in Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) to run an operation on taking them down. In turn he recruits his old partner Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro) to help him, especially since Alejandro still has anger toward them for killing his family.

The mission is to make it look like the cartels are attacking each other, and one of those attempts is kidnapping the daughter of a kingpin, Isabela Reyes (Isabela Moner). Of course, not everything goes as planned. Now, Matt and Alejandro have to figure out how they will survive with all sides closing in on them.

The first Sicario, which came out in 2015, was a surprisingly dark thriller that wasn’t afraid to go there and pushed our expectations on what a movie with this kind of material should be. So when a sequel was announced, many like myself, were eager to see what they would do, and how they would put us back into this world they created in the first film. Now, before we move on, obviously with the real-world issues going on at the border, it will probably be a little hard to watch this, without trying to bring it into the conversation. However, at this point, the conversation feels dated because the real-life issues are more horrifying. But, let’s just move on from that.

Unfortunately, Day of the Soldado doesn’t quite live up to the sequel expectations that the film should have had. The film at times feels rather empty, and instead of going for more character development or deeper story points like the first film did, it goes for the easy bloodshed and violence. That’s fine for the world the movie has created, but after watching Sicario, I wanted more of that great character development. Violence is expected in these movies, but I wanted more from the story itself.

On top of that, the sequel does feel like a proper sequel. By that I mean, even though the sequel has different people behind the scenes, they tried very hard – and sometimes actually pulled it off – to make you think the sequel was directed by Denis Villeneuve, and the cinematography was done by Roger Deakins. Of course, that’s not the case with the movie being directed by Stefano Sollima and the cinematography was done by Dairusz Wolski (Prometheus, Alien: Covenant, All the Money in the World). The score, which is great, was done by Hildur Guonadottir, who actually worked on the first film’s score and on films like The Revenant and Arrival. He builds off the amazing score that was done by the late Johann Johannsson, who sadly passed away between the films.

Thankfully, the cast is solid to make the missteps worth it. Brolin gets a bigger role in the sequel, and gets to play around with the character a lot more. Benicio Del Toro as Alejandro is once again great to watch, and how he engages with Isabela Moner’s Isabela and others – which aren’t many by the way – is good, but none of them are really like the Emily Blunt character from Sicario. Moner is fine as Isabela who knows what her father does, and uses it sometimes, but is still a young girl caught up in a bad situation. Everyone else like the returning Jeffrey Donovan as Graver’s other right-hand man, Steve Forsing, is a welcome sight, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo has a small but effective role, and Matthew Modine and Catherine Keener basically have cameo roles, especially Modine.

The only blemish on the cast, for me, is Elijah Rodriguez as Miguel. It’s nothing against Rodriguez and his acting, but rather the character direction or the lack thereof. The movie almost treats Miguel as someone we saw in the first movie, and that’s a problem especially considering where his character ends up at the end of the film. I wouldn’t consider this a spoiler, because it’s known – at least online – that after the success of Sicario, the plan was to make the series a trilogy. That’s made very clear with Miguel’s character, but for me, the character and the arc doesn’t feel deserved or developed enough for me to care.

All in all, Sicario: Day of the Soldado, for me, wasn’t as good as the first film. While it ups the violence you would expect from this world, it leaves behind the story and characters just a bit. That’s not to say the sequel is a bad movie, because it’s not. There are some standout scenes, and even some shocking scenes that I couldn’t believe they approved. The cast is still great, and while I wasn’t a huge fan of how they left the movie at the end, I would gladly step back into this world when/if a third movie comes out.

Sicario: Day of the Soldado

3.5 out of 5

‘Incredibles 2’ Review

Director: Brad Bird

Writer: Brad Bird

Voice Cast: Craig T. Nelson, Holly Hunter, Sarah Vowell, Huck Milner, Bob Odenkirk, Catherine Keener, Brad Bird, Michael Bird, Sophia Bush, Samuel L. Jackson, Isabella Rossellini and Jonathan Banks.

Synopsis: Bob Parr (Mr. Incredible) is left to care for Jack-Jack while Helen (Elastigirl) is out saving the world.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

14 years, 14 years is how long we’ve waited for the sequel to The Incredibles, and arguably, one of Pixar’s more popular films. Now, as much as we love Pixar, and should never doubt them – expect Cars 2 – the long gap was something to be a tiny bit concerned about. So, was the wait worth it? For the most part, yes, yes it was.

Incredibles 2 picks up immediately where the first film left off, the Underminer attacks the city and we see the Parr family try to stop him before he wrecks the city. However, things don’t go as planned and the already ban on Supers doesn’t get any better. Enter charismatic billionaire Winston Deavor (Bob Odenkirk) and his sister Evelyn (Catherine Keener), who want to bring Supers back into the spotlight. Winston’s power move is to start with Elastigirl/Helen (Holly Hunter) – as Mr. Incredible/Bob (Craig T. Nelson) is seen as a more destructive – to get Supers legalized again.

This leaves Bob to be the stay-at-home dad and watch over their kids Dash (Huck Milner), Violet (Sarah Vowell) and baby Jack-Jack, whose powers are starting to kick in. Of course, let’s add in a new supervillain going by The Screenslaver entering the picture causing havoc throughout the city.

Incredibles 2 does a lot of things that work on a story and theme level. On a story level, giving the spotlight to Elastigirl, which I’m sure most will see as part of the changing tide in the industry, is awesome. We get to see her let loose, and she is given the most exciting and thrilling action sequence with her cool motorcycle. On that end, we see the roles reversed and have Bob/Mr. Incredible staying at home having to deal with their superpowered kids and a baby in what is both funny and relateable.

Not only that, Bob now has to deal with not being a superhero, even though that’s the thing he loves. So the Incredibles 2 not only deals with role-reversals, but also teaching the younger audience about pride and sacrifice. Of course, that will go over kids’ heads but it’s nice to see Pixar trying to deliver that message.

Let’s get to the other characters. Jack-Jack easily steals the whole movie by not just being adorable, and using his newly developed powers. Violet gets a subplot with a boy and Dash, arguably, comes off as a tad annoying, but that’s the character. Frozone, voiced again by Samuel L. Jackson, doesn’t do too much, and Brad Bird once again voices Edna Mode (E) in a nice little bit part. The new characters do okay with Sophia Bush voicing a Super named Voyd, who happens to be a fan of Elastigirl, Bob Odenkirk can play charismatic characters in his sleep by now and Catherine Keener as Evelyn was a nice surprise.

All in all, Incredibles 2 was, for me and many others from the looks of it, worth the wait. The animated sequel has some great action, a great story and a hell of a lot of fun and funny. The only complaint I think I would side with, to some extent, is it picks up right after the first movie, and doesn’t do a time jump. However, that said, after seeing the movie and having time to simmer with the movie, I’m okay with it not time-jumping.

Incredibles 2

4.5 out of 5

‘Ocean’s 8’ Review

Director: Gary Ross

Writers: Gary Ross and Olivia Milch

Cast: Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Sarah Paulson, Helena Bonham Carter, Mindy Kailing, Awkwafina, Rihanna, Richard Armitage, James Corden and Anne Hathaway

Synopsis: Debbie Ocean gathers an all-female crew to attempt an impossible heist at New York City’s yearly Met Gala.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

I’ll admit out front, I’m a huge fan of Steven Soderbergh’s Ocean’s Eleven. Ocean’s Twelve was forgettable and Ocean’s Thirteen was a nice return to form, so when the word broke that a spinoff was in the works within the same world, I was cautiously optimistic. Then it was announced that it would be female-centric, and the cast got together I was fully on-board. So, is Ocean’s 8 a worthy companion, or is it a misfire?

Ocean’s 8 starts off with Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock), the sister of George Clooney’s Danny Ocean, who is getting out of prison after serving a five year sentence. Even though she puts out the front that she wants to live the “simple life,” she immediately sets a plan in motion to steal a diamond necklace called The Toussaint at the Met Gala. She begins to enlist her team in her old partner-in-crime Lou (Cate Blanchett), jeweler Amita (Mindy Kailing), hacker Eight Ball (Rihanna), who ends up being called Nine Ball by Debbie and the team, pickpocket Constance (Awkwafina), a “fence” in Tammy (Sarah Paulson) and fashion designer Rose Weil (Helena Bonham Carter). Why a fashion designer? Because, Debbie’s plan is to put the Toussaint on actress Daphne Kluger (Anne Hathaway) while she attends the Met Gala in order to actually steal it.

Right off the bat, you know how Debbie Ocean works, and how good she really is at conning people. We also get right into it what the movie will be about. Director Gary Ross doesn’t waste too much time getting the team together and putting the plan into motion. That is both an advantage and disadvantage for the movie. On one hand, you have a fast-paced movie giving you exactly what you want to know before getting to the meaty bit. On the other, it gives you everything you need to know, and sometimes has to fill the void because you don’t want to move too fast.

That said, if you’re a fan of Ocean’s Eleven, some beats and even some of the shots, cinematography wise, will feel very familiar to you. Of course, this isn’t directed by Steven Soderbergh, but Gary Ross – although the two are close friends – but Ross is not Soderbergh. However, Ross does put his own stamp on the movie, and doesn’t try to give a movie beat-for-beat, but do his own thing. That’s to be applauded, and the fact that these are all women and not men, is brought up. It’s not preachy or trying to put forward a message, it’s a heist movie that happens to follow women who are good at conning people. That’s it.

Speaking of that, the cast is great here, and all of them have their chance to shine. Of course, Sandra Bullock gets the most screen time here, and she does a great job playing the leader here. Cate Blanchett seems to be enjoying her very loose and highly fashionable Lou and Sarah Paulson’s Tammy is a mom running cons on the side in a funny way. The standouts of the cast are Anne Hathaway, who basically plays a characterization of what real people probably think she acts like, and surprisingly, James Corden stands out as a character that comes in near the end, and brings some laughs. Unfortunately, even though the rest of the cast do get a chance to shine, not everyone is really fully developed or given a chance to shine more. Awkwafina gets lost in the shuffle, Mindy Kaling is fine but given her job, you’d think she’d have more to. Rihanna and Helena Bonham Carter are good too, but I would have personally like to see more of them – it’s also nice to see Helena Bonham Carter play a normal person for a change.

All in all, Ocean’s 8 is a fun and worthwhile companion movie to Ocean’s Eleven. While the movie does have some pacing issues, and the final heist leaves something to be desired, you’ll have fun watching the cast together.

Ocean’s 8

3.5 out of 5