‘Ghostbusters’ Review


Director: Paul Feig

Writers: Paul Feig and Katie Dippold

Cast: Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon, Leslie Jones, Chris Hemsworth, Neil Casey, Cecily Strong, Andy Garcia, Michael Kenneth Williams, Matt Walsh, Annie Potts, Dan Aykroyd, Ernie Hudson, Sigourney Weaver and Bill Murray

Synopsis: Following a ghost invasion of Manhattan, paranormal enthusiasts Erin Gilbert and Abby Yates, nuclear engineer Jillian Holtzmann, and subway worker Patty Tolan band together to stop the otherworldly threat.


*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

*Reviewer Note 2: Stay for the credit sequence and for the post credits.*


Ghostbusters for some reason, although justified for some, received a lot of hate when it was announced. It didn’t help, for those against it, that they decided to gender-swap the leads from male to females. Many thought, for some reason, this lessen the Ghostbusters franchise and automatically went out of their way to make sure they spread their negativity to anyone that would listen or read their comments. Thankfully, some remained optimistic or at least open-minded to the idea of the reboot – because that’s what it is, a reboot – and gave it a chance. With a pretty descent cast and a reliable director in Paul Feig, Ghostbusters to me looked to be in good hands. Then again, I’m not against remakes or reboots like most people, especially if it does something different to elevate itself, but let’s be honest too, some movies could use a reboot/remake. Was Ghostbusters one of them? Probably not, but it’s here and guess what? It’s not that bad.

This Ghostbusters follows physicist Erin Gilbert (Wiig), who finds out her former friend Abby Yates (McCarthy), has put their old paranormal activity book online and when she goes to try and convince her take it down, she is informed of a ghost-sighting. Erin then lets it slip to Abby, so Abby, Erin and Abby’s engineer Jillian Holtzmann (McKinnon) go to find the ghost and when they do their finding goes public. However, the event is only the start as they find out ghost appearances are happening more often, when MTA work Patty Tolan (Jones) goes to them and shows them her findings. She eventually joins the team and they form the Ghostbusters, along with the dim-witted assistant Kevin (Hemsworth), they learn someone is actually causing ghosts to appear, and they are more dangerous than they thought.


The team does a great job of making Ghostbusters their own, but they do make a healthy amount of nods to the original, including the cameos by the original cast – not including Rick Moranis, who retired from acting – and some plot points. But, for the most part this new version establishes itself as the new Ghostbusters. The movie doesn’t try to make the characters new versions of the old characters, they all have their own strengths and different personalities that makes their characters their own. It does have some tonal confusion as the film tries to balance comedy, action and horror. Some of the combinations in the scenes work, while others are a bit jarring, but overall the tones do fit for what the film is trying to accomplish.

Of course, some people won’t see that. All they will see is actresses playing the new Ghostbusters, which is sad and, I’m not really that sorry, pathetic. Having the leads be female does nothing to change what Ghostbusters is all about. Wiig, McCarthy, McKinnon and Jones have great chemistry together, and are one of the reasons – if not the only reason – this reboot works. McKinnon is definitely one of the highlights of the film as the weird, enthusiastic about her science, and bursting with energy in every scene she’s in Holtzmann. She also has probably one of the coolest scenes in the final act of the film that I, obviously, won’t spoil here, but it was pretty badass.


The other casting highlight is the much talked about Chris Hemsworth as Kevin. Hemsworth already showed he had comedic chops in Vacation, but here, he plays the dim-witted character so well, I won’t be surprised if we see Hemsworth casted in more comedies down the line. Wiig and McCarthy do their usual best, and this also “proves” that McCarthy doesn’t have to use her weight to be funny. Jones is as equally funny, and while many feared that she would be screaming her lines, it does happen, but it doesn’t take away from the fact that she’s funny as hell in the film too.

Neil Casey plays the “villain” in the film, Rowan North. I put villain in quotes because you can arguably saw the ghosts are the bigger threats throughout, until we realize what Rowan’s plan really is. Rowan’s arch in the film is underdeveloped and since we only get a few scenes with him in the film before he does he reveal-evil-plan-to-heroes thing, we get enough time with him. The rest of the supporting cast is played out by Andy Garcia playing the Mayor, Cecily Strong playing his assistant, and Michael Kenneth Williams and Matt Walsh playing government agents. Of course, the original stars make cameos in the film, but I’ll leave you to experience those first-handed.


One of the things I was really impressed with was the CGI. It was one of the things I noticed in the first trailer and had me at least hooked. Thankfully, the CG works and never looks wonky or unfinished in any way, and it does add to scenes. It also helps that whenever the ghosts appear, especially in the great final act Times Square face-off, the film pops with color. This is the other big thing that sets this version apart from the original. Feig makes his version standout when he gets the chance, and when he does, that’s when the film works the most.

All in all, many people won’t give the film a chance because the main characters are female and because it’s a reboot – I stress again, not a remake – of the original film. But screw those people; Ghostbusters is well worth the watch especially when Paul Feig goes out of his way to make this version his own. The cast is great and delivers their comedic lines to perfection. Some jokes do fall flat, but that’s the case with all comedies. I thoroughly enjoyed Ghostbusters, and yes, can’t wait to see what they do with this new potential franchise.



4 out of 5


New Podcast – Thor: Ragnarok, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Paul Feig Talks Ghostbusters & More

Who’s ready for another podcast?

This week I tackle Michael B. Jordan’s casting in Black Panther, Transformers 5, Sherlock Holmes 3, Andy Serkis’ darker toned Jungle Book film, Dwayne Johnson joining a cinematic universe, DC Films making some major changes and a movie with Harley Quinn in the works, and Paul Feig’s reaction to Ghostbusters internet reactions, Thor: Ragnarok’s big cast, and Spider-Man: Homecoming’s Villain and Michael Keaton possibly coming back.


Also, I’ll have a written reviews of Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising, The Nice Guys, and maybe The Angry Birds Movie this weekend. So stay tuned.


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‘Spy’ Review


Dir: Paul Feig

Writer(s): Paul Feig

Cast: Melissa McCarthy, Jude Law, Jason Statham, Rose Byrne, Miranda Hart, Bobby Cannavale, Peter Serafinowicz, Nargis Kakhri, Morena Baccarin and Allison Janney

Synopsis: A desk-bound CIA analyst volunteers to go undercover to infiltrate the world of a deadly arms dealer, and prevent diabolical global disaster.



*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*



Ever since Bridesmaids, Melissa McCarthy has been almost the go to woman for big comedy movies. While they weren’t meet with a lot of acclaim like Bridesmaids, McCarthy still tried to do the best she can. Here with Spy, like The Heat, she reunites with writer/director Paul Feig and brings McCarthy back to form and makes her a great, strong, and funny character as oppose to a character that sometimes relies on being dumb or fat jokes. Feig and McCarthy’s Spy is going back to their roots and it is a fun ride.




Spy follows Susan Cooper (McCarthy), a desk-bound CIA agent who assists one of the CIA’s top agents, Bradley Fine (Law). However, when a mission reveals that the top field agents’ identities have been compromised Deputy Director Elaine Crocker (Janney) has no choice but to send an agent that is completely unknown, Susan of course volunteers because she wants to prove herself. The objective is to get close to the daughter of an arms dealer, Rayna Boyanov (Byrne) to get a nuclear bomb off the market before someone buys it. Of course, not everyone thinks Cooper is capable, especially the other top super spy in the agency, Rick Ford (Statham), who thinks sending in Cooper is the worst idea possible and that she’s going to blow the mission.


Like I mentioned earlier, McCarthy isn’t playing a dumb character here, her character Susan Cooper is extremely capable of handling herself, yes the movie pokes fun a bit, especially in her covers, but it doesn’t take away from the fact that she is a good agent and is willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done. That being said, this is McCarthy’s movie. She carries the movie on her shoulders and never shows a sign of giving that up. She shoots out witty one-liners left and right and has no problem pulling punches either. I was surprised that McCarthy could carry herself in action sequences. Easily, one of the highlight action sequences is a kitchen brawl (more on that in minute).




Of course, a great lead always has a great supporting, and Spy is filled with them. Jason Statham easily stands out. Statham’s Rick Ford is the pretty cliché tough guy agent that thinks he’s the best, but is a bit too intense, but it’s fun to see Statham in the role because it’s a lot of fun to see him in it. Miranda Hart is equally great as Susan’s analyst’s friend and has a buddy-cop dynamic with McCarthy’s Cooper, but also carries a lot of heart, even though she’s rather goofy (in a good way). Rose Byrne looks like she is enjoying the entitled posh-like villain and the same goes for Jude Law, who is essentially playing a James Bond-like persona. Peter Serafinowicz’s Aldo is another to look out for too.


I give huge credit to Paul Feig, because holy crap did he handle the action sequences great. I don’t like to limit directors or actors to their genre, but finding out that Feig is a huge fan of the action films and spy movies, it completely makes sense when you watch the movie. Spy is filled with great homage’s to the spy genre, but also makes fun of it which is really great and funny to watch.




The action in the movie is pretty solid. I mentioned the kitchen brawl between Susan and Lia (Nargis Fakhri) is easily a highlight. The scene is funny, brutal and kinetic. I didn’t really suspect a fight scene like that being in a comedy movie. It’s a spoof either, it is a real deal fight scene and both ladies don’t hold back. Another highlight is a chase scene that involves Susan chasing down a car in a scooter which is pretty impressive. If Feig ever wanted to do another action comedy, let him do it because he can certainly put it together really well. (Note: Yes, I know he did The Heat which had some action, but nothing compared to Spy.)


All in all, Spy stumbles only slightly but for the most part is a hell of a lot of fun to watch. It’s equal part spy action movie and comedy, dare I say the better of the action comedies of late. Feig and McCarthy are a great team and the supporting cast makes the film even better. This is not your typical Melissa McCarthy movie, so go watch it and give it a chance.



4.5 out of 5


‘The Heat’ Review


Dir: Paul Feig (Bridesmaid)

Cast: Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy, Demian Bichir, Marlon Wayans, and Michael Rapaport

Synopsis: Uptight FBI special agent Sarah Ashburn is paired with testy Boston cop Shannon Mullins in order to take down a ruthless drug lord. The hitch: neither woman has ever had a partner — or a friend for that matter


*Review Note: This is a non-spoiler review as always.*


Some have been waiting to see what Paul Feig’s follow-up to his blockbuster Bridesmaids would be and the answer is The Heat staring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy as mismatched partners.

Straight-laced FBI agent Sarah Ashburn (Bullock) is an uptight agent who sees taking down a Boston crime ring as her chance at a big promotion. When she gets there her case collides with the foul-mouthed, rough and tumble Boston cop Shannon Mullins (McCarthy) who treats her boss (Thomas F. Wilson) as harshly as she does her suspects. After a series of clashes, Ashburn and Mullins realize they’ll have to work together if they’re going to close this case.

McCarthy and Bullock have great chemistry and are clearly having a blast together going back and forth. The cast features a number of familiar faces that have some moments, including Marlon Wayans as an FBI agent, Demian Bichir as Ashburn’s boss, SNL’s Taran Killam as a cop, and Jane Curtin, Michael Rappaport and Nathan Corddry as members of Mulluns’ family.

The comedy is kind of out there in where some miss their mark completely and others will most likely have you laughing out loud with a good audience. It is a buddy comedy so there will be some things that we’ve seen before in the genre that will probably bore you.

All in all, The Heat is pretty damn funny. McCarthy and Bullock great together and it’s no surprise that they are working in a sequel. The movie has it’s drama moments that might slow down the movie for some people but it does make some sense and raises the stakes a bit.


The Heat

4 out of 5