‘Mission: Impossible – Fallout’ Review

Director: Christopher McQuarrie

Writer: Christopher McQuarrie

Cast: Tom Cruise, Henry Cavill, Simon Pegg, Ving Rhames, Rebecca Ferguson, Vanessa Kirby, Sean Harris, Michelle Monaghan, Alec Baldwin and Angela Bassett

Synopsis: Ethan Hunt and his IMF team, along with some familiar allies, race against time after a mission gone wrong.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Mission: Impossible is arguably one of the best action franchises still around. The franchise has come a long way since the first film back in 1996, and since J.J. Abrams brought back the franchise in 2006, they keep getting better and better with every sequel. However, director Christopher McQuarrie has definitely put his stamp on the franchise, especially since he’s the only director to back came to direct a sequel. So where does Fallout stand in the franchise? Pretty high up there, to be honest.

Mission: Impossible – Fallout follows Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise), and his team of Benji (Simon Pegg) and Luther (Ving Rhames), as they track down a dangerous new organization called The Apostles, a spinoff if you will, of the criminal organization The Syndicate from Rogue Nation. The group is run by mysterious and unknown John Lark, who is after plutonium cores to set off bombs around the globe. After a botched attempt to get them before Lark, the CIA’s Erica Sloan (Angela Bassett) forces Ethan and the IMF to have bring along August Walker (Henry Cavill) to insure they finally get the plutonium and Lark. Of course, all of that is easier said than done, especially when Ilsa (Rebecca Ferguson) and Solomon Lane (Sean Harris) reenter the picture.

I’m not going to lie, I really, really liked this movie. Fallout is thrilling from beginning to end, and doesn’t really ever let the reigns go for anything. The characters, which have all primarily been in the series before work well together. You believe that Ethan, Luther and Benji care for one another and would do anything to protect each other, while also trying to successfully complete their mission. Ferguson’s Ilsa, even though this is her second film – a rare feat for female characters in the series – also feels right at home when she shows up. These are characters we’ve seen and care about, so when certain things are set into motion, or even when they’re picking on one another, we get an emotion out of it.

I don’t want to take a jab at another long-running franchise – Fast & Furious – but Fallout knows who their characters are, and isn’t afraid to have them outshine one another every now and then. Even though Cruise’s Ethan is the lead, everybody has their moment, and it’s awesome to see them take the reins and roll with it.

When it comes to the new characters, more particularly, Henry Cavill’s Walker, he is the perfect opposite of Cruise’s Ethan. Ethan would rather take care of something as smoothly and hazard-free as possible, Walker will just straight-up walk up to the situation, get his hands dirty and deal with the consequences later. It’s also nice to see them play off with each other, and it’s even more apparent during one of the many standout sequences in the HALO jump.

Mission: Impossible is known now for their big set pieces, and Fallout is no different. While the HALO jump is cool to see – looks great in IMAX – there are two chase scenes in Paris that had me on the edge of my seat, and that’s all I’ll say that about. That said, the series has made itself proud of doing a lot of their stunts and action sequences with no to little CGI, which is maybe one reason why fans appreciate these films – as they should. That’s the case here, and while it looks like they used some CGI in little parts here and there, Fallout is probably the most daring for stunts, especially knowing that Tom Cruise broke his ankle during one of the stunts – which they actually ended up using in the film.

As much as I really liked the movie, there are some things that just kind of didn’t work for me. For one, and this is something I can’t believe I’m saying, Fallout is a just a tad bit too long. Fallout is the longest of the Mission: Impossible films and you can clearly feel it before the third act gets going. Cast wise, Angela Bassett’s Erica Sloan is kind of wasted here, even though her character doesn’t necessarily call for her to be in the film a lot, having someone like Bassett play the role, and having her disappear for most of the film was odd. Sean Harris’ Solomon Lane isn’t as compelling as he was in Rogue Nation, but he’s also now the only villain to appear in two Mission: Impossible films. Lastly, and this is something I didn’t mind, but others probably will, Fallout relies a little bit too much on small twists.

All in all, Mission: Impossible – Fallout is one of the best experiences you’ll have in theaters this summer. It’s got great action, the cast is spot on, the score is also damn great and it’s thrilling from beginning to end. I can’t say enough good things about Fallout. The fact that Mission: Impossible has had the staying power and continues to get better with every installment is amazing and hard to believe, but somehow they keep doing it, and I’m all for it.

Mission: Impossible – Fallout

5 out of 5

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July Movie Releases

Hello!

It’s July everybody! The Summer Movie Season is almost over, but it’s not going down without a fight. July has some great movies coming out, especially some anticipated movies for some. I’d also want to apologize for putting this up late. I started a new job and it’s completely messed up my schedule for everything (you may have notice there’s been no podcast for a few weeks now). So let’s get to it.

 

4th

The First Purge

Written by series creator James DeMonaco, the prequel will focus on the lead up and show the very first Purge event. The Purge movies started out as a small-scale house invasion thriller that had the potential for open-world sequels. Thankfully, that’s what we got and now after three movies, DeMonaco is finally giving us the prequel he’s talked since The Purge: Anarchy. The movies have also always had a political theme to them – at least in some way – and The First Purge looks to fully be embracing that which could be good. The First Purge stars Y’Ian Noel, Luna Lauren Velez, Lex Scott Davis, Melonie Diaz and Marisa Tomei.

 

6th

Sorry to Bother You

In an alternate present-day version of Oakland, telemarketer Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield) discovers a magical key to professional success, propelling him into a macabre universe. As soon as I saw this trailer I was immediately hooked. What’s better, is I don’t know how this movie will turn out in the end, and that’s what has me excited. Sorry to Bother You also stars Tessa Thompson, Armie Hammer, Jermaine Fowler, Omari Hardwick, David Cross, Patton Oswalt, Steven Yeun, Terry Crews and Danny Glover.

 

Ant-Man and the Wasp

As Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) balances being both a Super Hero and a father, Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly) and Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) present an urgent new mission that finds the Ant-Man fighting alongside The Wasp to uncover secrets from their past. After what happened in Avengers: Infinity War I think we need a good balance of a comedy with Ant-Man, and now we have the long awaited introduction of The Wasp on the big screen. What’s not to be excited about? The sequel co-stars Michael Pena, Laurence Fishburne, Hannah John-Kamen, Randall Park, David Dastmalchian, T.I., Judy Greer, Walton Goggins and Michelle Pfeiffer.

 

13th

Limited Release: Don’t Worry He Won’t Get Far on Foot

A biography about John Callahan. On the rocky path to sobriety after a life-changing accident, John Callahan discovers the healing power of art, willing his injured hands into drawing hilarious, often controversial cartoons, which bring him a new lease on life. The rest of the cast includes Jonah Hill, Rooney Mara, Jack Black, Carrie Brownstein and Udo Kier.

 

Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation

Mavis (Selena Gomez) surprises Dracula (Adam Sandler) with a family voyage on a luxury Monster Cruise Ship so he can take a vacation from providing everyone else’s vacation at the hotel. Once there, romance arises as Dracula meets the ship’s captain, Ericka (Kathryn Hahn). Little do they know, Ericka is a descendant of Dracula’s ancient nemesis, Abraham Van Helsing. The rest of the voice cast includes Kevin James, Steve Buscemi, David Spade, Fran Drescher, Keegan-Michael Key, Molly Shannon, Andy Samberg and Mel Brooks.

 

Skyscraper

FBI Hostage Rescue Team leader and U.S. war veteran Will Ford (Dwayne Johnson), who now assesses security for skyscrapers. On assignment in Hong Kong he finds the tallest, safest building in the world suddenly ablaze, and he’s been framed for it. A wanted man on the run, Will must find those responsible, clear his name and somehow rescue his family who is trapped inside the building. As much as I love Dwayne Johnson on the big screen being our modern day action hero, Skyscraper’s trailers have been rather mixed. I’m sure the movie will be entertaining as hell, but the trailers just aren’t selling it for me right away. The cast includes Neve Campbell, Pablo Schreiber, Roland Moller, Byron Mann and Chin Han.

 

 

20th

Limited Release: Blindspotting

A timely story about the intersection of race and class, set against the backdrop of a rapidly gentrifying Oakland. The film stars Daveed Diggs, Rafael Casal, Janina Gavankar, Jasmine Cephas Jones and Tisha Campbell-Martin.

 

Unfriended: Dark Web

A teen comes into possession of a new laptop and soon discovers that the previous owner is not only watching him, but will also do anything to get it back. I never saw the first movie, merely because it didn’t look that great, but the sequel  looks to be upping the ante a bit on the concept. The movie stars Getty Gabriel, Rebecca Rittenhouse, Chelsea Alden, Colin Woodell, Stephanie Nogueras, Andrew Lees and Douglas Tait.

 

Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again

The sequel follows Donna’s (played by Meryl Streep and Lily James) young life, experiencing the fun she had with the three possible Dad’s of Sophie (Amanda Seyfried). Sophie is now pregnant. Like Donna, she will be young when she has her baby. This is where she realizes she will need to take risks like her mother did. The cast includes Dominic Cooper, Christine Baranski, Julie Walters, Andy Garcia, Pierce Brosnan, Stellan Skarsgard, Colin Firth and Cher.

 

The Equalizer 2

Robert McCall (Denzel Washington) serves an unflinching justice for the exploited and oppressed, but how far will he go when that is someone he loves? The Equalizer was one of my surprises of 2014, and seeing Washington and director Antoine Fuqua reunite was great. Now, we have another reunion between the two, but also the first sequel for both men, and it looks like they’re upping the ante in both story – making it personal – and action, which going off the first film’s final act, it should be good. Cast also includes Pedro Pascal, Sakina Jaffrey, Bill Pullman and Melissa Leo.

 

27th

Limited Release: Hot Summer Nights

A boy comes of age during a summer he spends in Cape Cod. This was filmed before Chalamet became a household name after Call Me By Your Name, so I’m sure the studio is hoping that will sell the movie. The film stars Timothee Chalamet, Maika Monroe, Jack Kesy, Alex Roe, Emory Cohen, Maia Mitchell, William Fichtner and Thomas Jane.

 

Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

The Teen Titans are determined to get their own superhero movie, so Robin and the others try to get noticed by Hollywood’s hottest director. Certain they can pull it off, their dreams are sidetracked when a super villain tries to take over world. The voice cast includes Tara Strong, Khary Payton, Greg Cipes, Scott Menville, Hynden Walch, Kristen Bell, Lil Yachty, Halsey, James Corden, Will Arnett and Nicolas Cage.

 

Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Written and directed by Christopher McQuarrie, once again, Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his IMF team, along with some familiar allies, race against time after a mission gone wrong. I don’t know how the Mission: Impossible movies do it. They keep getting better with each installment AND they keep looking great in the trailers, so hell yes I am excited for this. Fallout co-stars Rebecca Ferguson, Simon Pegg, Henry Caavill, Alec Baldwin, Ving Rhames, Sean Harris, Vanessa Kirby, Michelle Monaghan and Angela Bassett.

 

What are you looking forward to?

The Movie Pit Spoiler Reviews – The Mummy & It Comes at Night

The third installment of The Movie Pit Spoiler Reviews is here!

This week it’s A24’s newest film, It Comes at Night and Universal Pictures’ first film in their new shared monsters universe – Dark Universe – in The Mummy.

 

‘The Mummy’ Review

Director: Alex Kurtzman

Writers: David Koepp, Dylan Kussman and Christopher McQuarrie

Cast: Tom Cruise, Annabelle Wallis, Sofia Boutella, Jake Johnson, Courtney B. Vance, Marwan Kenzari and Russell Crowe

Synopsis: An ancient princess is awakened from her crypt beneath the desert, bringing with her malevolence grown over millennia, and terrors that defy human comprehension.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Universal Pictures’ shared monsters universe, called Dark Universe, is finally here. The originators of shared universe are set to bring their monsters back to the big screen in a big way, and they started it all with The Mummy. I’ve been looking forward toward the Dark Universe since it was announced, because I’m a fan of the classic black-and-white horror films and the iconic characters – if you haven’t seen them, I highly recommend you do. So my hope for The Mummy is that it started off the shared universe strong. Unfortunately, that’s not entirely the case. The Mummy stumbles to create the universe off on a strong note, but is there a glimmer of hope? Let’s find out.

The film opens with showing us the history of Princess Ahmanet (Sofia Boutella) and how she got mummified for her terrible actions toward the Pharaoh. We cut to the present and find soldiers Nick Morton (Tom Cruise) and Chris Vail (Jake Johnson) in Iraq, who after failing to discover a treasure, accidentally discover an ancient and mysterious tomb. This introduces archaeologist Jenny Halsey (Annabelle Wallis), who has been searching for something like this for years. There they discover an ancient sarcophagus that belongs to Ahmanet, and that’s when things start to pick up.

After awakening from a plane crash that he should not have survived from, Nick starts to see visions of Ahmanet telling him he’s chosen for something. This leads Nick and Jenny going to London to meet Dr. Henry Jekyll (Russell Crowe), who runs a mysterious organization called Prodigium, which keeps tabs on the world’s greatest evils and monsters to see how much of a threat they really are. With Ahmanet’s power growing, and Nick’s visions getting worse, everyone is in a race against time to stop Ahmanet from unleashing her fury to the world.

I’ll give The Mummy credit in getting a great cast together. Tom Cruise is already well-versed in big films like this and can handle himself thoroughly. I’ll also give the film credit in trying to make Nick unlikeable to some degree, but of course once everything starts happening to him he changes more than one way. Sofia Boutella as Ahmanet/The Mummy has a great look to her, but is surprisingly underused. Despite being called The Mummy we don’t really see her breakout in her full terror glory like I think the film needed. Sure she does some pretty terrifying things, but never to the point where the build up for her is really worth it.

Annabelle Wallis’ Jenny is more of the straight character here, and isn’t too bad, but overall she doesn’t do too much other than fill us in on the history of everything. However, holding your own against someone like Tom Cruise is a feat on its own. Jake Johnson’s Chris Vail brings the comedy relief, and his chemistry with Cruise is fantastic that I hope these guys do another movie together. Finally, Russell Crowe as Dr. Henry Jekyll, and yes, his alter ego “Eddie” Hyde – that’s what he calls himself. Crowe and Prodigium will most likely be the connective tissue for the Dark Universe as their headquarters is filled with some noteworthy Easter Eggs. Crowe himself is fine, although it should be interesting to see how his character goes from here. Even with his split personality, his character can go from welcoming to serious, and I don’t know if they were just trying to rush this tease for the bigger scope of shared universe, or if it was written poorly.

The action is okay, although the highly promoted plane sequence is pretty much what we see in the trailers. Personally, my favorite action set-piece is when Mr. Hyde shows up, I won’t get too into it, but it’s pretty cool. However, when it comes to the horror moments they lack the certain tension that the film should have had. Especially considering that it’s already been announced the universe will a mix of horror and action-adventure. While The Mummy has that in full, the execution of it lacks the punch.

Another thing that doesn’t help is the film has a little too much going on. We have the introduction of Prodigium and what they do, Nick’s visions and Ahmanet’s reign of terror that has a subplot attached that doesn’t have enough time to breathe, which is kind of a shame because it could have been awesome to see fleshed out more.

All in all, The Mummy isn’t the best start to Universal Pictures’ Dark Universe but there are glimmers of what could be a good new shared universe. While the film is a bit too packed for its own good, and leaves certain things underdeveloped and underwhelming, The Mummy does have a good cast and some descent action set-pieces to keep you entertained.

The Mummy

3 out of 5

Mini-Reviews: Keeping Up with the Joneses, Jack Reacher: Never Go Back, Desierto, Ouija: Origin of Evil, & Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Hey everybody!

Welcome to the sixth edition of Mini-Reviews. This time, there are more movie reviews than usual. I’ve been a bit behind so this is me making up for lost time. So let’s get to it, shall we?

 

 

Keeping Up with the Joneses

Director: Greg Mottola

Writer: Michael LeSieur

Cast: Zach Galifianakis, Isla Fisher, Jon Hamm, Gal Gadot, Matt Walsh, Maribeth Monroe, Kevin Dunn and Patton Oswalt

Synopsis: A suburban couple becomes embroiled in an international espionage plot when they discover that their seemingly perfect new neighbors are government spies.

 

I didn’t think much about the film other than the fact it had a good cast. Ironically, I had that same feeling about Masterminds, which also had Zach Galifianakis, and while Keeping Up with the Joneses was a better movie than Masterminds, the film doesn’t do enough to warrant being a standout action comedy.

The film follows Jeff (Galifianakis) and Karen (Fisher) Gaffney, who quietly live in the suburbs. Karen is an interior designer while Jeff works Human Resources for a big company called MBI. However, the lives get turned upside when their new, and seemingly perfect, new neighbors Tim (Hamm) and Natalie (Gadot) Jones turn out to be spies. When the Joneses come clean, the Gaffney’s ended up being sucked into their mission to stop a deadly plot.

Keeping Up with the Joneses isn’t the best action comedy out, but it certainly isn’t the worst. The cast isn’t that bad and the mismatched casting of Galifianakis and Fisher with Hamm and Gadot actually works, although the bonding scenes and overall chemistry of Galifianakis and Hamm plays out better than Fisher and Gadot. There are some genuine laughs in the film, but overall the film does shoehorn in some jokes that fall completely flat. The film also does rely more on the comedy side of things rather than the action. Although the standout action sequence is a car chase that does feel a bit out of place within the movie, but one that actually works in terms of action.

All in all, the film does have a lot of issues, and while many will probably end up forgetting they watched Keeping Up with the Joneses in a few years, it isn’t completely a waste of time like some will have you believe it is.

Keeping Up with the Joneses

3 out of 5

keeping_up_with_the_joneses

 

Jack Reacher: Never Go Back

Director: Edward Zwick

Writers: Edward Zwick, Richard Wenk, and Marshall Herskovitz

Cast: Tom Cruise, Cobie Smulders, Danika Yarosh, Aldis Hodge, Patrick Heusinger, Holt McCallany, Madalyn Horcher, and Robert Knepper

Synopsis: Jack Reacher must uncover the truth behind a major government conspiracy in order to clear his name. On the run as a fugitive from the law, Reacher uncovers a potential secret from his past that could change his life forever.

 

The first Jack Reacher was a pleasant surprise when it came 2012, but when the sequel was announced without director Christopher McQuarrie, fans were, respectfully, disappointed. That being said, the sequel went forward to new director Edward Zwick (Glory, Blood Diamond), who worked with Tom Cruise on The Last Samurai. However, the result this time around was not that great.

Never Go Back finds Jack Reacher (Cruise) traveling to Washington D.C. to meet up with Major Susan Turner (Smulders), who he has been talking to recently, and someone who has taken over his old unit. However, when Reacher finally reaches D.C. he finds out that Turner has been arrested for espionage, but something doesn’t feel right to Reacher and he decides to get to the bottom of it. To make things worse, Reacher finds out that there is a paternity suit against him and that he has a 15-year-old daughter named Samantha (Yarosh).

Tom Cruise really wants another franchise, and Jack Reacher could have been it if Never Go Back wasn’t such a mess. Cruise nails the no nonsense, tough guy one-liners, but having Reacher become a potential father doesn’t really fit the character, and at times, slows the movie down trying to make awkward situations where Reacher has to act like a father to Sam – and in some cases have Turner act as a mother. Some of the scenes are funny, but feel out of place next to the Reacher breaking nameless thugs’ bones, and a hitman named The Hunter (Heusinger) killing people that stand in his way.

I’m all for shaking a character up, but we’ve only had one movie with Reacher, and the first one had him as this unstoppable hitting machine that gets the job done. He’s like that here too, but it seems like he’s more tamed down this time around. There is a little more action this time around, although there’s nothing that compares to the chase scene in the first film.

The new cast is a nice addition. Cobie Smulders does the best she can with what they give her, but I kind of wished she was more important to the overall plot. Danika Yarosh as Sam, Reacher’s possible daughter, holds her own with Cruise and Smulders, but she’s sometimes left with being the person that it told to stay back or having to be saved. Patrick Heusinger’s The Hunter is an okay villain, when he’s actually being a villain, and Robert Knepper is severely underused.

All in all, Jack Reacher: Never Go Back is an okay movie that happens to be a sequel. Not saying the potential franchise can’t come back, but Never Go Back was a step backwards for the character.

Jack Reacher: Never Go Back

3 out of 5

jack_reacher_never_go_back_ver3

 

Desierto

Director: Jonas Cuaron

Writer: Jonas Cuaron and Mateo Garcia

Cast: Gael Garcia Bernal, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Alondra Hidalgo, Diego Catano, Marco Perez, Oscar Flores and David Lorenzo

Synopsis: A group of people trying to cross the border from Mexico into the United States encounter a man who has taken border patrol duties into his own racist hands.

 

Directed by Jonas Cuaron, the son of Alfonso Cuaron (Children of Men, Gravity), Desierto is a timely film about the border of Mexico and the U.S., and while Cuaron does understand the material and issue, he rather follow the dangerous cat-and-mouse game between our leads. It’s not so much a bad thing, but Cuaron is still learning his footing in the directing game. It should also be noted that the names of the characters are never said in the film – only in the credits.

Desierto follows a Mexican man, named Moises in the credits, played by Gael Garcia Bernal, who along with a group of Mexican immigrants are coming to cross the border illegally. When the truck they’re in breaks down, they are left to walk the rest of the way in the desert. However, they aren’t alone as a man, named Sam in the credits, played by Jeffrey Dead Morgan finds them and kills most of the group. Moises, along with a few others, are left to survive in the desert against Sam and his dog Tracker.

The film is one of the ultimate cat-and-mouse game films. The majority of the film is Sam chasing down Moises through the desert, which of course, adds a lot of tension since there is not a lot of places to hide there. It’s a hell of a lot harder when you also have a tracking dog and a madman with a rifle chasing you down. The film works best when it’s a thriller of the characters on the run, but it’s once it slows down is when the film starts to show its faults.

It’s not hard to see the political themes, especially this late in the political season. Sam’s truck even has a small confederate flag and once he kills the first group of people he sarcastically says “welcome to the land of the free.” It’s not a bad thing, but Cuaron never fully develops that idea, and chooses to focus on the chase instead.

When it comes the cast, Gael Garcia Bernal and Jeffrey Dead Morgan fully invest in their characters. Jeffrey Dean Morgan doesn’t go over-the-top like he could have, but he also doesn’t see what he’s doing as wrong. In fact he barely flinches when killing the characters from far away. Gael Garcia Bernal, on the other hand, plays his character pretty straight. He’s trying to survive to make it to his kids, and does something in the film that I didn’t think the film would do. The only other character that gets some more depth is Alondra Hidalgo’s Adela.

The film does lose some steam near the end during the final confrontation between Moises and Sam because Cuaron wanted to keep the camera rolling. I’m not saying it wasn’t bad, but this is what separates him and his father in the director’s category. Although, not many directors are Alfonso Cuaron.

All in all, Desierto isn’t a bad film, but it works better when it’s a cat-and-mouse thriller rather than being a cat-and-mouse political undertone thriller. While Gael Garcia Bernal and Jeffrey Dean Morgan are on point with their roles, the overall film lacks a certain punch to put it over the top.

Desierto

3 out of 5

desierto

 

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Director: Tim Burton

Writers: Jane Goldman

Cast: Asa Butterfield, Eva Green, Ella Purnell, Samuel L. Jackson, Finlay MacMillan, Lauren McCrostie, Chris O’Dowd, Rupert Eveertt, Allison Janney, Judi Dench, and Terence Stamp

Synopsis: When Jake discovers clues to a mystery that stretches across time, he finds Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. But the danger deepens after he gets to know the residents and learns about their special powers.

 

Based on the novel written by Ransom Riggs – which I haven’t read yet – and directed by Tim Burton, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children was a movie I was actually looking forward to despite it being directed by Tim Burton. I haven’t been a fan of Burton’s for a while, but it looks like he was returning to form with his X-Men-esque fantasy tale. Also, having never read the book, I’m judging the movie for the movie itself, and not how loyal the film is to the book.

The film follows Jake (Butterfield), who is living in Florida, and wants to do something more in his life. That just happens when his grandfather, Abe (Stamp), passes away supernaturally. Remembering some stories as a child, Jake convinces his reluctant father (O’Dowd) to go to Wales so Jake can get closure on his grandfather’s passing, and maybe find out what really happening, all the while remembering the stories of his grandfather about a woman he once knew called Miss Peregrine (Green). Eventually Jake finds out the stories of his grandfather are not stories at all, and finds Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children that has children with powers of invisibly, floatation, pryokinesis, and other peculiarities. However, Jake finds out that all of them are stuck in September 3rd, 1943. Worse of all, dangerous monsters – known as Hallows – are after them lead by Mr. Barron (Jackson).

The film works best when the fanatical elements are in full swing. When Jake direst arrives at the home and meets everyone, the film is fun. We get to see everyone uses their abilities. Ella Purnell’s Emma is the one we get to know the most as she and Jake spend the most time together, her peculiarity is air and being able to float off the ground. We also meet Olive (McCrostie), who can turn into anything she touches into fire, Hugh (Parker) who is always invisible, Enoch (MacMillan) who has an interesting ability that leads to a surprising and cool sequence near the end of the film. There are twins, Claire (Raffiella Chapman) has a mouth on the back of her head, Horace (Hayden Keeler-Stone) can project his dreams, Fiona (Georgia Pemberton) can manipulate nature, and Bronwyn (Pixie Davies) is super strong.

It did seem like Miss Peregrine was tailor-made for Burton, and Burton does his usual thing and makes sure that the whimsy never fully gets put in the background. When the film does go off the fantasy element is when the film slows down a bit, but that rarely happens in the film. However, the film does get lost in itself for a bit, which is prone to happen when you have a lot going on. There’s even one plot point bought up that gets completely forgotten about once it’s introduced.

The cast does a great job with everything they were asked to do. Butterfield’s Jake does have a peculiarity that makes sense for the film, and one that makes the film rather suspenseful at one point. Eva Green as Miss Peregrine is great to watch. Green brings a levity and grand approach to the children’s guardian. Samuel L. Jackson’s Barron character is, well, Samuel L. Jackson playing a bad guy – minus the swearing. His character is a bit too cheesy at times and just a smidge over-the-top. Judi Dench, Rupert Everett, Chris O’Dowd, and Allison Janney pop in for small roles that don’t really do too much in the film. One casting I couldn’t get over is Kim Dickens, who appears in literally two very short scenes as Jake’s mother.

All in all, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is one of the better Tim Burton films in the recent years. While the film does have some things wrong with it, the cast and whimsy of it all will keep you invested until the end.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

3.5 out of 5

miss_peregrines_home_for_peculiar_children

 

Ouija: Origin of Evil

Director: Mike Flanagan

Writers: Mike Flanagan and Jeff Howard

Cast: Elizabeth Reaser, Annalise Basso, Lulu Wilson, Henry Thomas and Parker Mack

Synopsis: In 1965 Los Angeles, a widowed mother and her two daughters add a new stunt to bolster their séance scam business and unwittingly invite authentic evil into their home. When the youngest daughter is overtaken by a merciless spirit, the family confronts unthinkable fears to save her and send her possessor back to the other side.

 

A sequel/prequel to the 2014 film, Ouija – which I never saw by the way, and kind of have no intention on seeing to be honest – Origin of Evil, is just that, an origin of the evil Ouija board that causes mayhem to the people that used it.

Ouija: Origin of Evil, set in Los Angeles in 1965, it follows the Zander family in mother Alice (Reaser), eldest daughter Lina (Basso) and youngest daughter Doris (Wilson), who run séance scam, but Alice does think she’s doing good by helping people, even if it’s not really true. Desperate for money, the family adds an Ouija board to shake things up. However, when Doris starts using the board more, strange things start to happen around the family, and eventually the family finds out that Doris has made contact with actual spirits – and they aren’t happy.

Never seeing the first film (although I read what the connection was afterwards), I can only judge the film for what it was, and in part I really enjoyed the film. Origin of Evil keeps a great deal of the focus on the family, making us really care for these characters, and when everything goes to hell at the end, you do feel worried for them. It also helps that the actresses are great, but the highlight and real star of the film is Lulu Wilson, who plays Doris. One scene in particular stands out where the focus is on her and talks about a certain subject that really sticks with you, and despite the subject, I couldn’t help but laugh because it was so uneasy to hear her talk about it.

The film does have some missteps, like a subplot with Henry Thomas’ character Father Tom. The subplot doesn’t really lead anywhere, and while it gives Elizabeth Reaser’s Alice more screen time, it felt shoehorned in. The other thing is the Ouija board. The board, while a huge and really only reason the events of the film takes place, is just hanging out in the background. The film could have probably done without the Ouija board and found a way to introduce the spirits another way.

All in all, Ouija: Origin of Evil handles itself pretty well, as a horror film that also has a solid family story holding it together. While I may not have understood some of the little things that may connect it to the first film, I still really enjoyed it for what it was.

Ouija: Origin of Evil

3.5 out of 5

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‘Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation’ Review

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Dir: Christopher McQuarrie

Writer(s): Christopher McQuarrie

Cast: Tom Cruise, Jeremy Renner, Simon Pegg, Rebecca Ferguson, Ving Rhames, Sean Harris, Simon McBurney, Jens Hulten, Simon McBurney, and Alec Baldwin

Synopsis: Ethan and team take on their most impossible mission yet, eradicating the Syndicate – an International rogue organization as highly skilled as they are, committed to destroying the IMF.

 

*Reviewer Note:  This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

20 years ago the first Mission: Impossible movie was released. Yes, twenty years ago, and it is holding strong all these years later with only five films. The franchise knows what it is and Tom Cruise is without a doubt still the face, and will continue being the face of the franchise as long as he can still run and do those crazy action sequences. The Mission: Impossible films have always been a ton of fun and while taking some missteps *cough* Mission: Impossible 2 *cough* it still manages to find its way to our hearts. So with the fifth film now out, Rogue Nation shows the franchise still has life in it and won’t stop any time soon.

 

Director Christopher McQuarrie takes over script duties and the director’s chair, but has some big shoes to fill after the success and great entries of Mission: Impossible 3 and Ghost Protocol – which have a special place in my heart. McQuarrie doesn’t waste any time either; he gives us the tone and pacing right in the opening scene and doesn’t let up. His action sequences are done really well and you never lose yourself in the scene.

 

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As for the story, Rogue Nation continues off where Ghost Protocol left off, Ethan (Cruise) is on the hunt for The Syndicate, a shadow organization that has been committing a string of terrorist attacks across the world that is lead by Solomon Lane (Harris). Meanwhile, CIA Director Alan Hunley (Baldwin) wants to dissolve the IMF for good, seeing them and Ethan as having too much free reign during their missions, and even seeing Hunt as an “arsonist and fireman.” This puts Ethan in Hunley’s radar and makes him a wanted man in the eyes of the government. Of course, that doesn’t stop Ethan from hunting down The Syndicate, especially once he makes an unlikely ally in Ilsa Faust (Ferguson), a Syndicate agent whose allegiance to both sides is questionable. So he also brings in Benji (Pegg), Brandt (Renner) and Luther (Rhames) to finally take The Syndicate down.

 

The Mission: Impossible films always feel like soft reboots with small trends and plot points that carry over from the previous films. Rogue Nation is no different. Obviously the team is the same, with the exception of not having a woman team member – Ilsa doesn’t really count. If anything, that would be one of my only nitpicky complaints about the films, in that they don’t bring back any of their female agents. However, Rebecca Ferguson is a damn fine addition to the cast.

 

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Speaking of the cast, Cruise is as comfortable as always playing Ethan Hunt and is even hinted of being a bit of a mythic figure within the organization. Simon Pegg, thankfully, has more to do this time around since joining the series. He isn’t just the comic relief, but actually part of the team. The previously mentioned Rebecca Ferguson is easily one of, if not, the highlight of the cast as Ilsa. Ferguson is relativity new to the scene, with her only other big screen performance being the mostly forgettable Hercules from last year. However, Rogue Nation shows that Ferguson should be someone you should keep your eye on.

 

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The supporting cast is okay, but not great as they usually are. Again, Pegg and Ferguson are the standouts while Jeremy Renner, who was once rumored to take over the franchise, takes a limited role here and doesn’t get into the action as much as he did in Ghost Protocol. Ving Rhames has a tad more to do here, but still takes a back seat for the most part. Alec Baldwin’s CIA Director Hunley is a natural antagonist for Ethan and it feels like he’s going to stick around.

 

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The Syndicate is the real villains of the film. The group is filled with agents from different organizations that are presumed dead and as Ethan finds out and Benji says, they’re “an anti-IMF.” The group is pretty much filled with no-named thugs with the exception of Ilsa and Jens Hulten’s Janik “The Bone Crusher” Vinter, who is a right hand to the group’s leader and lead villain Solomon Lane, played by Sean Harris. Harris isn’t the strongest villain in the series, he is menacing for some of it, but he lacked a bit something for me, which is a shame since Harris is a great actor.

 

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But like the previous films, Rogue Nation has great action scenes. Of course, the heavily promoted hanging off an airplane scene is impressive to watch – especially in IMAX – and is even more impressive once we find out that Cruise actually shot the scene himself (with a safety harness of course). For me though the standout is the other heavily promoted scene that involves a car chase with some motorcycles. The other is gadgets, and the film does have some cool gadgets that do fit within the world of the Mission films, although some are very subtle.

 

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All in all, Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation is a ton of fun. The action is great and the standout of the cast isn’t just Tom Cruise, but Simon Pegg and Rebecca Ferguson, who I hope returns for future installments. I don’t know if Rogue Nation is as good as the last two films, but it is definitely up there.

 

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation

4 out of 5

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‘Edge of Tomorrow’ Review

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Dir: Doug Liman

Cast: Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt, Bill Paxton, Noah Taylor, Jonas Armstrong, Tony Way, Kick Gurry, Franz Drameh, Charlotte Riley, and Brendan Gleeson

Synopsis: An officer finds himself caught in a time loop in a war with an alien race. His skills increase as he faces the same brutal combat scenarios, and his union with a Special Forces warrior gets him closer and closer to defeating the enemy.

 

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

Live. Die. Repeat.

 

 

Based on Hiroshi Sakurazaka’s novel “All You Need is Kill” (with some changes obviously, although I don’t know how many because I haven’t read it), Edge of Tomorrow is a Groundhog Day-like movie with sci-fi elements, aliens, and the fate of the world. What more could you want?

 

Tom Cruise plays Major William Cage. More of a PR guy than a solider – even says he can’t stand the sight of blood – Cage goes to London to handle the media before a big attack, but ends up at odds with United Defense Force General Bingham (Gleeson) orders him to join the first wave so he can deliver a first-hand account of proceedings. That is if he can make it. Unsurprisingly, Cage sucks on the battlefield, even with the use of the weaponized suit. Once he finally gets a handle of the suit, he manages kill one of the aliens named Mimics and dies.

 

That’s right. Tom Cruise dies in the movie’s first ten minutes. And not some half-ass death either, no, it is a pretty gruesome death that I really did not see coming. But, of course we all know the twist is that Cruise doesn’t really die. It’s when he dies that he gets the power of a Mimic and he wakes up earlier in the day before the attack on the beach. Not knowing what’s going on at first, Cage relives the day over again and gets back on the beach but this time runs into war hero Rita Vrataski (Blunt). Rita soon realizes that Cage has gotten the ability that she herself once had before she lost it. She soon helps him to stop the all out extinction of the Mimics and destroy the source of their power.

 

One of the cool things about Edge of Tomorrow is the concept. Yes, we have seen it before but what the movie does it that it keeps a bit fresh. It is almost like a video game, Cage gets killed in a violent way every time but comes back and makes it a little farther every time. Every time he comes back, Cage is wiser and trains harder to become an actual soldier and stand side by side with Rita.

 

But with movies that involves some sort of time travel or repetition element to them, there is bound to be question raised on how everything works. Filmmakers can leave it up for the audience to figure out, or they have a character that describes it to them. Edge of Tomorrow has that character in the form of Dr. Carter (Taylor), who knows how the Mimics work and how the power that Cage has works. A lot of people usually see this as a sort of cop out because how does a guy know soo much about the enemy? This also leads to expositional block explaining how everything works and why it is important. Again, here Edge of Tomorrow begins to both distinguish itself from other films and is necessary, at least for this type of movie. But it does not mean it make mistakes along the way.

 

As you suspect, Cruise gets most of the screen time here, and does great. It’s nice though to see one of the biggest stars in Hollywood die over and over again, but also play a bit of a coward. We usually see Cruise play this hard, tough guy but here Cruise’s Cage will do anything to get out of fighting at the beginning. Emily Blunt is also good as always, and while I do not always agree with critics, Blunt should have gotten more screen time but thus is the position you play when starring alongside Tom Cruise.

 

The supporting cast has some real great moments, mostly over shadowed by Bill Paxton’s Master Sergeant Farrell. Paxton of course is no stranger to alien and genre fare movies so it is nice to see him here chewing up the scene. The actors that play J-Squad (Armstrong, Way, Gurry, Drameh, Riley) have their moments are, by the looks of them, the “loser” squad. Brendan Gleeson is nothing more than a glorified cameo, but is still nice to see him on screen, especially being a little antagonistic toward Cruise. Finally, the Mimics are interesting. Their designs look a lot like the Sentinels in The Matrix but are far quicker and deadlier looking.

 

Finally, despite all the action you see in the marketing – there is a lot – the movie is also really funny. The movie takes itself seriously, but never to the extent that it can not make fun of itself. Some of the funny moments come from Cage’s deaths, and some include Rita shooting Cage during to training. What’s also nice about the movie is you see the toll it takes on Cage to live day in and day out. Stuck in a loop you can’t escape from until you die, and then you have to restart. Yeah, that would suck.

 

All in all, I did not really expect to like Edge of Tomorrow as much as I did. The movie is fun and everything you want to enjoy in a summer movie. Everyone is either split of hates the ending of the movie. While I can see why people would have problems with it, I did not have a problem with it. If you want to have some fun, laugh, and see some pretty descent action Edge of Tomorrow will fill that need.

 

Edge of Tomorrow

4 out of 5