‘Glass’ Review

Director:  M. Night Shyamalan

Writer: M. Night Shyamalan

Cast: James McAvoy, Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson, Anya Taylor-Joy, Sarah Paulson, Spencer Treat Clark and Charlayne Woodard

Synopsis: Security guard David Dunn uses his supernatural abilities to track Kevin Wendell Crumb, a disturbed man who has twenty-four personalities.

 

*Reviewer Note: This will be a spoiler free review.*

 

The name M. Night Shyamalan for a while was a laughing stock. After breaking into the scene with The Sixth Sense, Unbreakable, and Signs, the director’s fanbase started to turn on him after films like The Village – which I didn’t personally mind – Lady in the Water, and, of course, the coup de grace to his career was the combination of The Happening and The Last Airbender. I’m not even going to mention After Earth – because do you remember After Earth? Does anyone?

Anyway, Shyamalan slowly came back with the still underrated The Visit, but then really returned to form with Split, which is true Shyamalan fashion, had the twist ending that no one saw coming – the whole movie was connected to Unbreakable. The long awaited sequel that everyone wanted was finally real, and when Split turned out to be a hit, Shyamalan went on to finish the trilogy he had wanted to create since Unbreakable’s release. Glass is a sequel nineteen years in the making, but was the wait worth it? Does Glass live up to the expectations Split left us with? Let’s dig in shall we?

Glass follows David Dunn (Bruce Willis), the only survivor of a deadly train crash fifteen years prior, which left him with super-strength and led him down the path of becoming the vigilante named The Overseer, all with the help of his son, Joseph (Spencer Treat Clark). After seeing the devastation left by Kevin Wendell Crumb aka The Horde (James McAvoy), David manages to track Kevin and faces off with The Beast until the two are taken in by the police and the mysterious Dr. Ellie Staple (Sarah Paulson). Dr. Staple sends them to a psychiatric facility with the goal being to convince them that their super-human abilities are all in their heads.

However, unbeknownst to David at first, Elijah Price aka Mr. Glass (Samuel L. Jackson) has been a patient of the facility since the end of Unbreakable, and when he learns of his new neighbors, a plan starts to go into motion.

Much like Unbreakable, Shyamalan keeps Glass as grounded as possible, well, as grounded as you can get with super-powered individuals. Buildings aren’t falling over, there are no over-the-top action scenes, although the brawls between David and The Beast look hard-hitting, and the characters feel real. In fact, Paulson’s Ellie Staple drives the point that David, Kevin and Elijah are just normal people and are “sick.” For the most part, it actually sounds somewhat believable, but it just falls a tad flat and too smart for its own good.

When it comes to the cast, James McAvoy steals the movie, continuing his amazing performances from Split. He actually gets to play around with the characters a little more this time around, and having Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson to play off of this time around adds a lot more to his performance. Willis thankfully doesn’t phone it in as the returning David Dunn, but it somehow feels like he’s underused. Then there’s Jackson’s Elijah. Despite the name of the movie being Glass, Jackson is heavily underused until the third act of the movie, and even then, it’s still mostly McAvoy’s show. It is a bit of shame to see that happen, especially considering how the movie ends.

The supporting cast have only a few moments to shine, with Spencer Treat Clark’s Joseph and Anya Taylor-Joy’s Casey getting the better of it. In fact, I’ll say that Taylor-Joy’s Casey has one of the better, if not the best scene in the movie, where she comes face-to-face with Kevin again. The two have great chemistry together, and it actually has a pay-off toward the end of the movie, which I really appreciated. It was also nice to see Charlayne Woodard return as Mrs. Price, but she doesn’t really have anything to do, other than a couple brief scenes with Jackson’s Elijah. Finally, Sarah Paulson’s Ellie Staple gets to shine along the main cast, and her presence does throw a wrench in everything.

Going back to the ending though, this is a spoiler-free review so I won’t spoil anything, but Shyamalan couldn’t help himself to put not just one twist in here. The problem with one of the twists is that, despite the concept of surprise twists, it literally comes from out of nowhere with no real context and no real lead-in. Shyamalan just throws it in to connect to his other twist, that has divided audiences already, and if you haven’t watched it, will divide you too.

It also doesn’t help that Glass is a bit sluggish throughout its runtime. The second act in particular is pretty slow paced, that when everything breaks down in the much promoted encounter between David and The Beast in front of the facility, we’re pumped to see what will happen. Unfortunately, for me, I honestly don’t know how to feel about the whole third act. It’s a bit too messy for me, and with all the hype and the exceeded expectations that Split led into Glass, it’s a shame that Shyamalan went down this road.

All in all, Glass had some great potential, and despite its saving grace performance by James McAvoy, Shyamalan’s surprise connected universe movie is a mess. Is Glass a bad movie? No, I don’t think so. Is it a frustrating movie? I would say yes, yes it is. Needless to say, the choice is ultimately yours on how you view the ending, and whether it fits into everything that was built up to it.

Glass

3 out of 5

January (2019) Movie Releases

Happy New Year!!

That’s right, ladies and gentlemen, we have a new year in front of us which means one thing: new movies! Now, January is usually referred to as Hollywood’s “Dump” Month. Meaning they will release movies that they don’t think will perform well or are not confident in. Sometimes that is the case, but sometimes a movie will shine through. January is also filled with expanded releases of movies that came out in late December, so there is also that to look forward to.

 

4th

Escape Room

Six strangers find themselves in circumstances beyond their control, and must use their wits to survive. The first time I saw the trailer for this, I honestly thought it was a remake of Cube, but with the modern twist of the highly popular Escape Rooms. The trailer itself is okay, but something tells me we probably saw most of the movie in the trailer already, which kind of sucks, but hey, what do you expect from the first new movie of the New Year? Those tend to not have the best track record anyway. Directed by Adam Robitel (The Taking of Deborah Logan, Insidious: The Last Key) – who also stars in the movie – Escape Room stars Taylor Russell, Deborah Ann Woll, Tyler Labine, Nik Dodani, Jessica Sutton, Jay Ellis and Logan Miller.

 

11th

A Dog’s Way Home

Based on the book by W. Bruce Cameron, a dog named Bella (voiced by Bryce Dallas Howard) travels 400 miles in search of her owner (Jonah Hauer-King), after she wandered away from home. I like dogs; I do, but dog movies, not so much. It also doesn’t help that the movie has that horrible CGI for the cougar (?). A Dog’s Way Home co-stars Ashley Judd, Alexandra Shipp, Edward James Olmos, Wes Studi and Ashley Judd.

 

Replicas

A scientist (Keanu Reeves) becomes obsessed with bringing back his family members who died in a traffic accident. This was originally set to come out last year, but the release date kept getting pushed back and back, and now it looks like it’s finally coming out. The premise seems interesting, and seeing Reeves out of the John Wick character is a nice sight. Replicas co-stars Alice Eve, Emjay Anthony, Thomas Middleditch and John Ortiz.

 

The Upside

A remake of the French film Les Intouchbales (which itself was based on a true story), a comedic look at the relationship between a wealthy man (Bryan Cranston) with quadriplegia and an unemployed man (Kevin Hart) with criminal record who’s hired to help him. It should be interesting to see how this movie does for a number of reasons. One, you got Kevin Hart and his drama with his old tweets coming into the limelight, also on the top of that, Hart is playing a little bit more of a serious character here. It’s also a remake, and well, you know how people feel about those (although, I’ll be interested in seeing how many people actually know it’s a remake). The Upside co-stars Nicole Kidman, Tate Donovan, Golshifteh Farahani and Julianna Margulies.

 

18th

Glass

M. Night Shyamalan returns to the world he created in Unbreakable and Split, security guard David Dunn (Bruce Willis) uses his supernatural abilities to track Kevin Wendell Crumb (James McAvoy), a disturbed man who has twenty-four personalities. This is arguably one of the most anticipated movies of the month, and maybe even the first quarter of the year. Not only did Split surprise almost everyone that watched it, but to then pull the last minute Shyamalan-twist and reveal that it was actually the long-awaited sequel to Unbreakable, oh boy. All that said, the cast is also fantastic, and I guarantee that scene with Willis, McAvoy, Samuel L. Jackson and Sarah Paulson in the same room is just going to be great. Glass co-stars Anya Taylor-Joy, Spencer Treat Clark, Luke Kirby and Charlayne Woodard.

 

25th

Serenity

Written and directed by Steven Knight (Peaky Blinders, Locke, The Girl in the Spider’s Web), the mysterious past of a fishing boat captain (Matthew McConaughey) comes back to haunt him, when his ex-wife (Anne Hathaway) tracks down with a desperate plea for help, ensnaring his life in a new reality that may not be all that it seems. I honestly don’t know what to think about this. On one hand, Knight is one of my favorite people working behind the camera, and then you have this mystery suspense story with Hathaway, essentially playing a Femme Fatale, as she tries to get McConaughey’s character to kill her current husband (played by Jason Clarke). My only thing is that they don’t try to play it too smart, and ruin their movie. Serenity co-stars Djimon Hounsou, Jeremy Strong and Diane Lane.

 

The Kid Who Would be King

Written and directed by Joe Cornish (Attack the Block), Alex (Louis Ashbourne Serkis) thinks he’s a nobody, until she stumbles upon the mythical sword, Excalibur. Now, he must unite his friends and enemies into a band of knights and work alongside the legendary wizard Merlin (Sir Patrick Stewart) to stop the evil enchantress Morgana (Rebecca Ferguson) from destroying the world. Besides the big roles of Merlin and Morgana, the movie is filled with unknown actors, which harkens back to Cornish’s Attack the Block – which you should watch if you haven’t yet – and it’s awesome to see Cornish back behind the camera. The movie itself looks like it could be good, and knowing what Cornish is capable of, we could be in for a fun ride.

 

What are you looking forward to?